100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 21, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SA'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SA

egacki Betters AAU
ndstrom Breaks Michigan Record
Pole Vault at Cleveland KC Games

Swim

Standard in

Butterfly

it

J

Smith Sets 'M' Record;
Juniors Win Team Meet

W-

Special to The Daily

VELAND - Eeles Landstrom
d over his own varsity1indoor
Slast night with a 14'9/4"
s he topped a list of several
[ichigan performances at the
and Knights of Columbus
meet.
"Flying Finn' bettered the
he established two years
the Michigan AAU meet by

ps Stage
e Finals

,werful Hamtramck and sur-
ing Lansing Sexton moved
r today's Class A state high
oo1 basketball championship
e by winning semifinal games
East Lansing's Jenison Field
se last night.
'e 'A' contest will start at 9
today at Jenison. It will be
eded by the 'Dl championship
1e between River" Rouge and
ly (7 :30 p.m.) ; the 'C' final
ween Muskegon Christian and
amazoo Christian (2 p.m.);
the 'D' contest between Bald-
and Maple City-Glen Lake.
cores of yesterday's semifinals:
LASS A-Hamtramck 53, Pontiac
Lansing Sexton 73, Grand Rapids
itral 44.
LASS B-River Rouge 6?, Plain-
11 34; Holly 60, Sault Ste. Marie 47.
LASS- C--Muskegon Christian 58,
sse Pte. St. Paul 46; Kalamazoo
ristian 48, Alecona 43.
LAS SD-MaplenCity-Glen Lake
Coldwater St. Charles 48; Baldwin
Fowler 54.

a half-in-inch. He failed, however,
to achieve what he claims is one
of his biggest goals: the desire to
become the first European to pole
vault 15' indoors.
The Wolverine senior left most
of the competition far below in
his winning height, including Don
Bragg-the world record holder.
' Bragg Fails
Bragg failed at 14'4", but was
hampered because he had just ar-
rived on a plane from Paris.
Michigan Captain Mamon Gib-
son jumped 14'3" to tie for third
place.
The other Michigan placer in
individual events was Dick Cephas,
who tied for second with Lt. Rob-
ert Gardner, U.S. Marines, at 6'6".
The jump matched Cephas' all-
time best and was just short of
Floyd Smith of the Chicago Track
Club, who had a 6'7%4'.
Wins Heat
Michigan won its heat of the
mile relay with a 3:22.7 clocking
but Morgan State stole the' show
with a Games' record of 3:18.0 in
a later heat.
Bryan Gibson, Don Chalf ant,
Marsh Dickerson and Tony Seth
comprised the Wolverine quartet.
Western Michigan was second and
Wisconsin third in this heat.
The Wolverines' two-mile four-
some finished third and was forced
a good distance behind dueling
Penn State and Manhattan. The
Pennsylvanians won the event
with a record 7:35.3.
Ton Robinsonwas edged out of
second place in the qualifying
round of a hotly-contested 50-yd.

dash. Ira Murchison, the winner
in the final, was first and Otis
Drayton, Villanova freshman, was
runner-up. It marked the first time
Robinson did not win the dash in
the present indoor season.
Pete Stanger failed to qualify in
the 50-yd. high hurdles, finishing'
fourth in a heat led by Lee Cal-
houn, who won the final.
Ergas Leps, a Michigan fresh-
man competing unattached, was
fifth and one place out of the
awards in the 1,000-yd. run.
Irishman Ron Delany, the meet's
big drawing card, won his 33rd
straight mile with a disappointing
4:06.6 and Hungarian Lazslo Ta-
bori won the two-mile with a
sparkling 8:47.8 in other key vic-
tories.

By BUZ STEINBERG
Frank Legacki swam the 100-
yd. butterfly in :53.2 to set a new
national AAU record to highlight
a Michigan intersquad meet as the
Wolverines prepared for next
week's NCAA championships at
Cornell.
Legacki, whose name will now
be filed in the record books, bet-
tered the old mark of :54.3. Two
others, Tony Tashnick and Dave
Gillanders, also came under the
wire in the pseudo-record time of
:54.2.
The oddity of this feat is the
fact that Legacki has not actually
been competing in the butterfly
event. He has won main recogni-
tion as a freestyler and has now
put another title under his cap.

GUS STAGER
... "nice send-off"

backstroke (2:05.3, thus beating
his pool record of 2:08.3), and
Bucy, stole the show.
Sophomores took only two firsts,
one in the 200-yd. butterfly by
Dave Gillanders (2:07.2) and the
other by Legacki in the 100-yd.
freestyle with an excellent time
of :49,3.
The sophomores, who won the
last intersquad meet in January,
were nosed out his time by the
juniors. The latter ended up with
a total of 26% points compared
to the sophomores' 23, the fresh-
men's 20, and the seniors' 17/2.
Anticipating the big weekend at
Cornell (in Ithaca, N.Y.) this
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday,
coach Gus Stager exclaimed,
"That heart-warming crowd last
night sure made this a wonderful
send-off."

PREPARING FOR THE 'BIG ONE'-Michigan swimmers (left to
right) John Smith, Tony Tashnick and Frank Legacki turned
what was supposed to be a warm-up meet into a record-fest.
Legacki bettered the American butterfly record by 1.1 seconds.
Tashnick, a NCAA record-holder in the butterfly, also was clocked
lower than the American standard. Smith established pool and
varsity marks in the backstroke.

Michigan Board Opposes
Round Robin Schedule

I

" i

Michigan will "vigorously" op-
pose the Big Ten plans for the 10-
game, round robin system and
"invoke every available means" to
prevent its eventual inauguration,
the Board of Control of Intercol-
legiate Athletics declared yester-
day.
In its annual report to the Re-
gents, the Athletic Board called
the 10-game season "too long"
and the round robin system "pro-
vincial," preventing Michigan
alumni from seeing; the team 'in
other parts of the country.
T dU~riA r S,

ORT SHORTS:
-w-.~i A t'AlFA' A

w omen, s, w i JW incet . [eri u uuo y;
West Virginia, Cal i'NCAA Final
W est ' 'trg nt'a ', L

The Board said the compulsory
round robin schedule, forcing the
Big Ten schools to play only each
other, changes the Conference
from an association of educational
institutions into a professional
type "playing league" whose pri-
mary objective is to schedule ath-
letic contests.
Might Break Conference
The system, said the Board, was
probably the major cause for the
forthcoming dissolution of the
Pacific Coast Conference and pre-
cipit'ated the breakup of the West-
ern Intercollegiate Hockey League.
Michigan's participation in a
new league, the proposed Western
Collegiate League, is still under
consideration, the report stated.
Discussing the two-year-old Big
Ten Financial Aid plan, the Board
~reported that 169 students have
accepted tenders of financial as-
sistance at Michigan, and that 70
were in the upper quarter of their
high school class. Five of the re-
cipiants dropped out during the
year and the average amount
awarded to the others was $1,025.20
during 1957-58. Total cost was
$72,939.30.
One-third Without Aid
The Board added that one-third
of the varsity athletes come to
Michigan without any financial
tenders.
Net profit for 1957-58 was $362,-
452, compared to $506,697 for the
previous year. Football receipts
during 1957-58 totaled $841,980.32.

Smith Sets Varsity Mark
In addition to this, John Smith
broke the Varsity Pool record in
the 200-yd. backstroke. He went
2:05.3, thus bettering =his previous
time of 2:08.3. Freshman Fred
Wolf (2:06.7) and sophomore Alex
Gaxiola (2:07.2) also went under
the previous record time.un
One must also take notice of the
other fine performances turned in
last night. Wolf, one of the out-
standing freshmen, took first in
the 200-yd. individual medley re-
lay.
Bill Darnton, Jim Kerr, Chuck
Babcock, and Terry Slonaker all
contributed to the freshmen's to-
tal.
Hanley Wins Freestyle
Dick Hanley took the 220-yd.
freestyle in the respectable time
of 2:03.9 and Pete Fries tied junior
Tom Bucy in the 440-yd. free-
style to lead the seniors.
The juniors, headed by Carl
Woolley in the 50-yd. freestyle
(:22.6), Smith in the 200-kd.

4 1

ON

'tr

SfAh% H
0)*ABr BATr

t Qax4a4+l:i Ljeaj MVOS
04- s+o!-{ UO40-4 /OIMS

he Michigan Women's AAU
m Championships will be held
iY at the VarsitY ]Pool.
he trials begin at 2 p.m., and
finals will be run off at 7 p.m.
be f eature event will be the
ng where Michigan's Kathy
twig will be defending her
Entered against her are two
mpic performers from the De-
t Athletic Club, Jeanne Stunyo
Barbara Gilders.
he team championship will
be hotly contested between

Detroit Women's City Club -nd
the Ann Arbor swim Club. The
two teams finished a point apart
last year with the Ann+Arbor Club'
being the yictor. Also entered
are the women from the Detroit
Turners.
West Virginia 94, Louisville 79,
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) - All
American Jerry West scored 38
points, 27 In a magnifcent first
half performance, and red-hot
West Virginia sattered home-

COTC C Hr - IJRCH

5PORT-WHYS,
{ ,
An Acclident
TT1 SHORT SPACE of a month the Board in Control of Inter-
ollegiate Athletics has come up with two of the finest and best
lified student members in its history. At the present moment the
.idr member and the newly elected sophomore are outstanding men
al aspects.
Terry Miller -- captain-elect of the basketball team - the junior
mber who will have another year to serve, is an outstanding student,
engineering and one of the best team leaders in any sport. Sopho-
re John Tidwell, elected earlier this week for a two-year term, is
o a student of top caliber and potentially one of the finest basket-
L.players in the Conference. Both men being highly conscientious,
;h on the athletic front and in the classroom, there is no reason to
ieve that the same will not be true withrespect to their work on the
ard.
There seems little reason to think that Miller and Tidwell aren't-
best qualified, and the best possible representatives that the
dent body could have at the present time.
nusual Ctrcumstances.. .
UT I WOULD LIKE to suggest thatsit is simply an accident such
capable members have been chosen.,
Miller was appointed by the Board itself, to replace a representa-
chosen by the student body who became academically ineligible.
was not chosen by the regular, method. There can be no criticism
the Board's selection in this case, as they have done a better job
.n the student body usually does. However, it must be remembered
,t the representative selected in the usual manner wasn't even able
complete his term-during which he seldom attended meetings.
Tidwell, on the other hand, was elected by the regular method.
mingly a very fine vote by the student body-but let's examine
Wctly why he was chosen. Basketball season was just over, and he
s one of the top players on the team-in fact, he was the second
t sophomore cager in the Conference. Certainly he is the best-
>wn sophomore athlete at Michigan. He completely swamped Tom
son,.the other contestant, who happened to play on an unsuccessful
tball team and sustained a mid-season injury that sharply cut his
ss notices.
Suppose the circumstances had been reversed, and the very capable
didate had been the lesser-known one. He wouldn't have won. The
dent body made a good choice simply because the good choice was
more popular and the better known. It was an accident.
roblems Still Exist ...
F COURSE, there are still some who will say that the new members
are not the best. Last fall's members were criticized because they
'e both football players, and the fact that Tidwell and Miller are
h basketball players will again draw comment. Certainly not all

town Louisville, 94-79 last night
in the opening semifinal of the
NCAA basketball championships.
He tore apart Louisville's de-
fense in the first half, then came
back with another outstanding
playmaking and rebounding exhi-
bition in the second half when
Louisville, down 23 points with
nine minutes to play, whittled the
Mountaineer lead down to 12.
California 64, Cincinnati'58
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (P) - Cali-
fornia upset Cincinnati 64-58 on
the clutch play of Al Buch and
Darrall Imhoff last night to gain
the finals of the NCAA basketball
championships.
With the great Oscar Robert-
son shackled in the, second half,
the Californians pulled even with
Cincinnati's Bearcats with 11 min-
utes to play, engaged them in a
shot-for-shot duel until three-
and-one-half minutes remained
and then rushed away for the vic-
tory.
Buch, a 6-2 senior from Brook-
lyn, N.Y., scored 10 of California's
last 19 points and Imhoff, a 6-10
towhead supposed to be better on
defense, added six-including a
turn-around jump shot with two
minutes to play that poked Cal
into the lead to stay.

233113'1 S13S3U
3fljN3AV 1tV JSV
3391IAIVZJ3Z33U8
W 1O13AOUHS~b
xm so Q N 3 a
L13MSNV Kfl(>I

I 1

IMurder in the Cathedral

T. S.

El iot

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Mosses 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M. and
12:00 noon.
Holyday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 noon^and 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8':00,, 9:00 A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister.
"Why We Observe Palm Sunday," Dr. Fred E.
Luchs preaching. Services: 9:30-10:20 and
1 1:00-12:00.
"The Trial," Bible Lecture by Mrs. Luchs 10:20--
10:40.
Church School: 9:30-10:40 and 10:55-12:00,
Crib through 9th Grade.
Student Guild: Will attend the Merrill Lecture
Series at the Presbyterian Church at 7:00 P.M.
Maundy Thursday Communion Service and Recep-
tion of Members, 8:00 P.M.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCHr
1917 Weshtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M. Church School. Adult Group-Wa!-
lace P. Wells, "Weekend Service Projects."
11:00 A.M. Worship Service-Sermon, "Salva-
tion for Liberals."
7:00 P.M. Student Group-Transportation fur-
nished.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND,
WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Hoover Rupert, L. Burlin Main,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:00 A.M. Worship: "What Kind of
a King?"
9:30-10:30 A.M. Discussion Group: "Paradoxes
of the Christian Faith-Humility and Assur-
once."
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper, Pine Room.
7:00 P.M. Worship and Program. Speaker: Rev.
Vaughn Whited, "Atonement."
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
at the First Presbyterian Church
1432 Washtenaw Avenue. NO 2-3580
Miss Patricia Pickett, Acting Director
Robert Baker, mAssistant
SUNsDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 12:00.
Dr. Kuizenga preaching.
1 0:30 A.M. Seminar, "Barriers to Belief."
11:30 A.M. Coffee hour.'
6:00 P.M. Student Supper.
7:00 P.M. Merrill Lecture: "'The Christian's
Response to Society," Prof. Joseph Har-
tounian.
TUESDAY-
9:30 P.M. Coffee Hour at Pat Pickett's
apartment, 217 S. Observatory. k s
WEDNESDAY-
4:15 P.M. UCF Midweek Worship at the
Congregational Chapel.
THURSDAY-
7:30 P.M. Maundy Thursday Communion
Service.

FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:00 and 11:30 Meeting for worship,
10:00 Sunday school and college discussion.
11:30 Adult discussion.
7:15 P.M. Young Friends.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday-School.
11:00 A.M. "Matter."
A free reading room is maintained at 339 So.
Main Street. Reading room; hours are Monday
11 :00 AM. to 8:30 P.M., Tuesday through
Friday 11:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; Saturday
9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.

'--

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Theo. A. Kriefall, Vicar
Saturday at,1:00 P.M.: "Work Holiday" afternoon
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:45 A.M.: Worship
Services, with sermon by the pastor, "Losing
Life, Yet Finding It."
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45 A.M.: Bible Study
Groups.
Sunday at 6:00 P.M.: Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Club, Supper' U Program. "Sign of
Jonah; 'put on by Gamma Deltgns from
Wayne State Univ.
Wednesday at 7:30 P.M.: Worship Service, with
Holy Comminian.
Thursday at 7:310 P.M.: Maundy Thursday Holy
Communion Service.
Friday at 1 :00 P.M.:.50 minute Good Friday Serv-
ice.

t
1
-a
°
i
',,
1
r . -,
1
r

' ;
I ., '.
r

{
}

A

Presented by
Lutheran St.
Association
Hill and Forest

MARCH 22
7:00 P.M.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
Morning Worship 10:45 A.M. Sermon Topic: "The
Christian News: God's Action in History," Rev.
Russell Fuller.
The Student Guild will attend the Merrill lecture,
"A Ch.ristian Response to Society," Dr. Joseph
Harouthunian, 7:30 P.M., Presbyterian Church.

I

~ I

II 1

K L KROSSWORD

ACROSS
1. Heady peaks
(var.)
7. A hankrof hair
goes here
13. ind of
instincts that
bring out
the wolf
14. What gals do a
half-hour late
15. Kind of
Tuesday
16. Guy who gives
horn lessons?
17. Indian who's
always in it?
18. You've got it
if you're sharp
20. Eastern college
21. Then in Paris
23. Makes a lemon
palatable
25. Notedseparation
center
26. You _ me e
27. Half a
French dance
29. It starts terribly
30. Spunk
84. Gardner,
but no
horticulturist
85. A little
previous
87. Buttons and
'Barber
39. Whatyou ought
to be smoking
41. Fatten up

DOWN
1. Hunting ground
for Yale men
2. It's cooler
with Kool
8. Same sparkle &
glow. 1/2 as soft
& 1/10 thedough
4. Something in
common
b. Talks big
6. Bob's last name
7. Lady in waiting
8. Spanish gold
9. The season's
eligible gals
10. Height of
highines
11. Nothing odd
here
12. Bird who
sounds whirly
19. Desirable
half a gallon
22. Half an
American dance
24. One of a
blue twosome
26. Breathers when
mermaidhunting
28. Mabel has him
surrounded
80. A wild kind
of ian
81. A reluctant
poem
32. Pointer,
Western style
33. New (Prefix)
36. Guy who'd do_

I 2 3 4 5 6
15

No.18
7 - 9 0 11 12
16

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgwood
Lester F. Allen, Minister
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
11 :00 A.M. Worship Service.
6:30 P.M. Worship Service.

-

r -i-=

I

- I-

1$ 19 2t
23 24
2b
I
Q oo

4I
ARE YOU KaDL
ENOUGH TO
KRACK THIS?"

33 .
35
38 39 40
4s 46

I 1

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street

AND THE

4,4

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C.-Bennett, Pastor
9:45 and 11:00 A.M. "God's Gifts to the
Church."
10:00 A.M. Sunday School-University Class.
5:45 P.M. Student Guild.
7:00 P.M. "Securityin a World of Change."
Wednesday-7:30 P.M. Prayer' Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU!
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
9:30 A.M. University Bible Class.^
10:30 A.M. Morning Worship Service.
7:00 P.M. Evening Worship Service.
CAMPUS CHAPEL /
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 3-0982; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M. Morning Service.
7:00 P.M. Evening Service.

1
f

4 Z 43

I I

4$
50

49

e

44. This one anything for hee ----
couldn't be 38. Dry
easier 40. A little less
+46. Devastate than moral SWITCH WICH FROM U T
48. Alter altars 41. Be audibly uI I T
49. It's across overanxious
the street 42 End of
60. Changes one's the league
type 43. Swifty
61. Second best 45. S - so?
thing on a 47. He takes care
sweater of the dogs
KD, .f.

i

8:00 A.M. Holy Communion ,
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon for
students, followed by breakfast and discussions
in Canterbury House..
1 1 :00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon
5:00 P.M. Canterbury Buffet Supper
5:30 P.M. Lenten Program
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and Musical Service.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks and the Rev. Hugh D.
Pickett, Ministers
Mrs.CGabrielle Bublitz, Assistant Student
Counsellor
9:50 A.M. Student Bible Class, study in the
Book of James.
Worship 9:00 A.M. and 11:00 A.M.-Dr. Loucks

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.

It-

II

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan