100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 11, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-02-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
CiVic Theatre Group To Present'Cat'
Those who have seen it nrp I

IN PERSON

OS CAR BRAND
a program of folksongs.. . and backroom ballads
Friday, Feb. 20, at the Armory (Fifth and Ann)
Tickets - reserved $2.20, general admission $1 .65

_,r __ - _7__ '.-.'.,. . R" _ 'Xi ti m mc t nv l ir r t f

viously performed. may not rec-
ognize the "Cat on a Hot Tin
Roof," which the Ann Arbor Civic
Theatre players will present at
8 p.m. tomorrow night to continue
through Saturday.
The Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre will be the scene of the first
performance of a third act of the
play, which Tennessee Williams
wrote and then altered to comply
with a director's wishes.

" inianisenoi r eamiteu n
he gave Elia Kazan, who directed'
the Broadway version of "Cat," a
first-typed version of the play at
the beginning of their association.
"Kazan was excited by it, but
he had definite reservations about
the play which were concentrated
in the third act," Williams related.
He felt that "Big Daddy" was
too vivid and important a charac-
ter to disappear from the play ex-

+THE DISC SHOP
1210 S. University
(open evenings)

LIBERTY
State St.

MUSIC
Branch

low
iii lb

DIAL,
NO 8-6416

ROSAU NDI= I !
The picture tops the bookli - -
The pictureotops the playi .
TIEC*INRMA*
1 TECHNICOLOR.
TpwWARNER BROS.
Two Complete Shows N ightly

STARTING TODAY

ALL ITS,

SWEEP/
ALL ITS
-THRILLS!

pt4O '36~
IL I

.1
I

I

--Daily-David Arm'ld
CIVIC THEATRE-Tennessee William's "Cat On A Hot Tin Roof"
will open at 8 p.m. tomorrow night at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre, given by the Ann Arbor Civic Theatre players. The
original, unrevised third act will be presented for the first time on
any stage.

i

eJAMES
'Maverick'
tn an amazing
role as a
"human torpedo"
EDMOND
O'BRIN
as the skipper
who had him on
his conscience

.II

G ARGOYLE
STAFF MEETING
Thurs., Feb. 12 at 7:30,
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
BUILDING
All new people invited

cept as an offstage cry after the
second curtain, the author ex-
plained.
The resultant revised third act
apparently more than satisfied'
audiences, if one may judge by the
fact that it received the Pulitzer
Prize for Drama in 1956 and the
New York Drama Critics Circle
Award.
University students Tom Leith,
'60, and Estelle Ginn, '60, will ap-
pear in the Civic Theatre produca
tion, which is directed by Ted
Heusel. Leith will be seen as
"Brick," while Miss Ginn will take
the part of "Margaret."
Curriculum
To Challenge
Able Students
(Continued from Page 1)
The juniors and seniors are
completely separate groups; the
juniors are preparing for their
last year by taking special litera-
ture courses. "They are chosen on
the basis of average (a B overall
and a B-plus in English is re-
quired), interview and the
strength of recommendations from
teachers who have known their
work," Prof. Greenhut said.
Seniors are chosen from those who
have successfully completed the
junior program.
Give Survey Courses
"In the junior year, two sur-
vey courses are given. These pre-
sent a. survey of English litera-
ture from the time of Chaucer to
that of Blake," Prof. Greenhut
said. In the fall semester. of th
senior year, honors students elect
a Seminar in Criticism devoted
chiefly to critical writings of Pla-
to, Aristotle, Coleridge, and T. S.
Eliot.
"In the spring there is another
seminar course. It consists of a
series of weekly lectures on sub-
jects of general interest to the
study of literature," Prof. Green-
hut added.
In the beginning of the senior
year, each student gets assigned
to a tutor of-his own choice. These
tutors are members of the English
department faculty who meet
with him regularly to discuss
matters related to the program
and specifically, to the writing of
the honors essay.E
Honors Essay.
This essay, criticalyin nature,
and of a student's own choice,
must be between 4,500 and 7,000
words. The papers grow out of
reading done in the progran, Prof.
Greenhut said. A student may use
subjects like philosophy and lit-
erature, and German and litera-
ture. Each student submits his
topic to his tutor around Christ-
mas. The tutors help the student
decide which one is "feasible and
suitable."
The essay must be completed in
the first half of the spring term.
The last half is spent, in prepara-
tion for an examination given in
May, and is based on the two
years work in the program. This
exam together with the essay de-
cides who will receive honors and
high honors at graduation.
VALENTIES
traditional and Contemporary
OVERBECK BOOKSTORE
1216 S. University NO 3-4436

160 PROGRAMS A YEAR:
Faculty Aids University TV
By JOHN FISCHER
With the help of University fac-
ulty members, the University tele-
vision office produces approxi-
mately 160 programs a year.
More than 600 faculty members
have participated on our pro-
grams, Prof. Garnet R. Garrison, z
director of broadcasting, said. .
Although all of the programs
are on film, all the care of a live
production is necessary. Closed-
circuit television cameras are used
and a special camera films a tele-
vision screen. This is called the
kinescope process.
Elaborate Preparations
Because of the nature of the
productions, 'elaborate prepara-
tions are made fop each program.
Betty Palmer, a producer-writer,
explained that some programs
take months before they are re-
leased to the public.

In choosing a subject for a pro-
duction, Miss Palmer said that the
television office's producers have
considerable liberty. There is no
direct control on most produc-
tions, but long series which would
require considerable investment
do require approval, she said.
Ideas for programs come from
many sources, Miss Palmer said.
Often the producer will get an
idea and call a faculty member,
but sometimes the faculty mem-
ber will call him. When personali-
ties visit the University, quite oft-
en the television office will bring
them to the studio for a 15 to 30
minute interview.i
Get Program Representation
The television office endeavors
through the years to get a pro-
gram representing each depart-
ment of the University, Miss
Palmer said, and sometimes, when
a producer notices that a particu-
lar department of the University
has not been represented recently,
he will call the head of that de-
partment concerning a program.
For example, when Miss Palmer
was told that there had not been
a program on public health sta-
tistics for a while, she contacted
the chairman of that department,
who referred her to Prof. Richard
Remington of the public health
statistics department.
After getting the idea, confer-
ences are held between the pro-
ducer, director and the faculty
"talent."
Presents Outline
First the producer presents the
"talent" with a bare outline of
the program; if this is approved,
the "first draft" is written, she
added.
In the public health program,
Prof. Remington and Miss Palmer
decided that the program's theme
would be on the misinterpretation
of statistics. Prof. Remington then
gave Miss Palmer example's of
misinterpretations,rand with these,
Miss Palmer wrote the script.
"The first draft is a complete
script," Miss Palmer said, "con-
taining cues and ideas for charts,
graphs, and when these special ef-
fects should appear.",

Now and then the first draft is
used as the final script, she said.
Usually from one to three re-
visions are made, she commented.
The producer then checks the
script with the "talent" and it is
checked for accuracy, smoothness
and timing.
After the final draft of the
script, a production meeting is
held with the director, staging
and graphics (art) departments.
Lighting, the physical set, and
other technical problems are dis-
cussed.
Schedule Rehearsals
Before the actual filming, a
number of rehearsals are sched-
uled. First there are preliminary
dry runs which are rehearsals
without any facilities and are oft-
en not even done on the set.
Here any problems such as tim-
ing, clarity or transitions from one
subject to another are ironed out,
Miss Palmer said.
Then comes the camera rehear-
sal, which is mainly for the direc-
tor's benefit, so that he can posi-
tion his cameras and run through
all other mecanical matters.
Pretend Filming-
Finally the dress rehearsal
comes, which is run straight
through just as if it were the ac-
tual filming. During this period
the producer checks pronuncia-
tions and the stressing of words.
After this the filming tokes
place; everyone is busy. The di-
rector never seems to stop talk-
ing, the cameras seem to be con-
stantly moving, and the engineers
carefully checking everything.
The film is then shipped to New

-Daily-Allan Winder
ON THE SET-Prof. Richard Remington of the public health
statistics department rehearses with the host, Douglas Chapman,
also of public health statistics, on the University television office's
production of "Fools, Facts and Statistics" which will be seen soon.

TECUKICOLOR' frog; WARNER BRO& eWARScoPE
with EDWARD "KOOKIE" BYRNES
The 'Cool Cot' of "77 Sunset Strip"

J.
f.
.
f.
.,"

York for processing to be sched-
uled on a number of the 22 sta-
tions on the University's "kine-
scope network."
State Conducts
Public Hearing
on New Road
(continued from page 1)
roads and road closures until pub-
lic hearings can be held. In Ann
Arbor, Pittsfield and York town-
ships. No dates were announced
for hearings.
Strong opposition to the pro-
posed location of the expressway
was demonstrated, however, by
many residents of the area as the
meeting continued into the after-
noon.
Two members of the Milan
Village Council and a group of
Milan property owners raised ob
Jections to the plan. ,The property
owners said they would have only
the use of a service road crossing
a double track railroad if the pro-
posed Eastbelt were constructed.
An alternate proposal was pre-
sented to the hearing, at which
approximately 250 people, were
present.
The alternate proposal by resi-
dents of the area was to use the
present US-112Southbelt, con-
necting with US-23 southeast of
the city and another proposed
northwest bypass connecting U-
12 with US-23 north of the city.
.The chief argument for this pro-
posal by its backers was that it
would save six million dollars,
since the construction of a North-
west Bypass is planned for the
future anyway, and it might as
well be utilized.
The present proposed Eastelt
Expressway begins at the inter-
section 'with US-12 Bypass, and
would run parallel to existing US-
23 on the west to a point north of
Washtenaw Road. It would then
turn east, crossing the 'Huron
River, and continue east of the
North Campus and north to the
Dhu Varren Road area, where it
would continue west to US-23
north of Ann Arbor.
In regard to the alternate pro-
posed route; using the Southbelt
road, the Highway Department re-
ported that probable increases in
the present 21,000 cars per day on
the Southbelt road would rule out
its use in carryin'g US-23 traffic
around the city.
Objections to the Eastbelt route
originally came due to plans which
had the road bisect North Campus,
the golf course and pass through
an expensive residential area.
Strong homeowner resistance re-
sulted, and the routing was re-
located to its present position
more to the north.
Wilbur continued that the High-
way Department does not believe
the Federal Bureau of Public
Roads would approve the alterna-
tive Southbelt expressway because
its regulations allow that "ap-
proval of revisions of any section
in an Interstate system will be
given, only under most unusual
circumstances and conditions
which would clearly justify this
approval."

National Science Foundation
To Award Research Grants,

.P'4
.. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Two krants are being awarded
the University today by the Na-
tional Science Foundation for the
purpose of conducting research
programs in Research Participa-
tion for Teacher Training.

111
DIAL NO 2-2513
COMING
Cecil B. DeMille's
"THE
BUCCANEER"

r
y:.;:

F'

The programs are to be carried
out during the summer of'1959.
Prof. M. L. Wiedenbeck of the
physics department received a
grant for a program of reactor
physics for college teachers and
Prof. Wilbert -J. McKeachie of the
psychology department for a pro-
gram in experimental psychology
for college teachers.
The two grants were part of a
total award of 56 grants involving
approximately $800,000-to 54 edu-
cational institutions.
The programs are geared to pro-
vide research experience during
the summer months for about 550
teachers of science and mathe-
matics. About 400 of these will
come from secondary schools and
the remaining 150 will conie from
junior colleges and small colleges
without appropriate research fa-
cilities.
The teachers receiving instruc-
tion in the program will be award-
ed stipends up to $75 a week plus
allowances for travel and depend-
ents.
nProf. McKeachie said the eight-
week summer program is "based
on the assumption that science
teaching improves when the
teacher has some contact with
scientific research."

oil

light eat er

EARTHA KH
SAMMY DAYIS, J.r:
His First Dramatic Screen Rota
Win Jolt You Out Of Your Seat!
"Dialogue is sharp and often funny,
- tense and exciting?" Variety

Get satisfying flavor...So friendly to your taste!

MASONIC TEMPLE, Detroit
I Scottish Rite Cathedral - Friday, Feb. 1 3-8:30 P.M.

...o* e*- ---** ..... eee
NO FLAT
~FILTERED-OUT" -
FLAVOR!
0 NO DRY
. N* DY *.**

See how Pall Mall's famous length of fine
tobacco travels and gentles the smoke-
makes it mild-but does not filter out
that satisfying flavor!'

S. HUROK presents
THE SHOW WHICH WON
SOLID RAVES ON BROADWAY!
"FABULOUS!" - Atkinson, Times - "TRI-
UMPHANT;"- Kerr, Her. Trib. - "1RRESIS-
TIBLE!" - Chapman, News - "BRILLIANT!"
- Gilbert, Mirror - "GOOD SHOW!" - As-
ton, W. Tele. - "SUPERB!" - Watts, Post -
"A HARVEST OF LAUGHS!" - Time --
"I IDDAARI I KY FU IMNY I" - Newsweek.

It

(HHE~J' IEM E

I

Back to Top

© 2018 Regents of the University of Michigan