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March 08, 1959 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-03-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

JrTCHIA N w

VV I

MEN'S, WOMEN'S APPAREL:
History Features Many. Changes in Fashions

'H

Wilkinson Mezzanine

Reformers have raved, moralists
have shouted, and manufacturers
< have walled, but changes in fash-
ions go on forever.
The 'New Look' after World
War It, with its long full skirts
was declared positively unpatriotic
by the British government since
cloth was scarce and clothing was
still being rationed, but to no avail.
Fashion took its course, and soon
the old styles were not only un-
fashionable but positively inde-
cent.
Business vainly fought the hob-
ble skirt of 1912 with its decrease
in the material used for a skirt.
Vast sums were spent in the early
1870's to persuade women to go on
wearing crinolines, but the bustle
was in, and hoop manufacturers
were out of business.
Principles Govern
-Daily-David Arnold Two principles govern fashion,
women's sportswear this spring according to James Laver, who
louses, with tight fitting pants. has written nunerous volumes on
n the fashion world also. the history of costume. The first
is the Hierarchical Principle, the
most impressive one in the history
of men's fashions. Here the pur-
pose of clothing is to raise men
above their fellows.
This is particularly noticeable
)Aw/ F ar i /in headgear, which tends to get
W Y C,/ / bigger and bigger, especially in
military uniforms, if not pulled
back to utility by, the annoying
New lines are very evident. Last interruption of war.
winter's Empire waist has returned While in earlier ages, the idea
in brief, bare romper suits, giving was to dress more richly than your
them a remarkably soft and femi- neighbor, the nineteenth century
nine look. Brand new are the wide ideal abandoned anything as
shoulders and full, belled sleeves simple and obvious as this. While
of many tops, a cool and breezy in all times, the sense of superi-
look. ority is fostered by wearing clothes
Leather Remains Popular
In AllFashion Wardrobes
Continuing high on the popu-
larity list again this spring are the the latest styles, leather makes the
many clothes, shoes and acces- fashion news.
sories made from leather products. Leather shoes with pointed toes
From top to tie - earrings to and straps crossing the vamp and
pumps-leather is prominent in buttoning, appear in all colors of
every fashion wardrobe. In vari- the rainbow emphasizing the new
ous colors, with tooling, and in "leggier' look.
To accentuate and allow for a
more versatile shoe, clips are be-
ing sold for use at the toe and heel
of the shoe. With different pairs,
shoes can also dress for the occa-
sion.
Purses-long and thin or deep
3 MAIN STREET and flat-with a touch of polished
brass or gold add just the right
touch to the varying tones of
leather.
fe these fine Gloves--always necessary and
often the item that spruces up
SPRINGN your outfit-reappear in doeskin
and kid this year. With the slim-
mest fit ever, the seams are almost
invisible. Long, medium and short
lengths all appear in wearable,
ever-popular leather in all shades
to match or accentuate.

which make it impossible to do any
manual labor, times of aristocracy
achieve this by using flimsy ma-
terials covered with embroidery
and times of gentility make clothes
of fairly stout material just too
tight ("well-fitting") for any ac-
tive pursuit.
Worn with Linen
"As further protection against
any suspicion of manual toil they
are worn with white linen exposed
at wrist and throat; that is, at
the two places where it is most
easily dirtied.
"A certain constriction of the
waist and a considerable constric-
tion of the throat, and the gentle-
man is complete. What is more he
is happy, for his happiness con-
sists in being or feeling like a
gentleman."
The Heirarchical Principle is
combined with the second, the
Seduction Principle, in women's
fashions, Laver says, "for a woman
is never more conscious of the
pride of life than when she feels
herself to be a desirable object."
Answers Offered
Various answers have been of-
fered to the question "Why do
people were clothes?" The most
popular answer of the last century
was for decency and protection
from 'the elements. Perhaps the
most remarkable answer came
from Philip Stubbes, a Puritan, in
1585. He maintained that one of
the main purposes of clothes was
to enable us to distinguish one sex
from the other.
Churchmen and reformers in all
ages save the present, when they
appear to have given up a hope-
less cause, have thundered against
the immorality of finery and the
worldliness of those who love their
fashionable clothes too well.
Limitations Tried
Rulers have tried to limit the
extravagence of their subjects in
all ages, but the ancient Persians
were no more successfull than later
authorities. Charles V's prohibi-
tion of long-pointed shoes was
successful only because the style
had gone out. Laws, moral fervor
and appeals to patriotism were
equally ineffective.
Men have been no less guilty of
being slaves to fashion than wom-
en. The following selection is in
'An Exquisite's Diary,' from The
Hermit in London, 1819:
"Took four hours to dress; and
then it rained; ordered the tilbury
and my umbrella, and drove to the
five's court; next to my tailor's;
put him off after two years tick;
no bad fellow that Weston . . .
broke three stay - laces and a
buckle, tore the quarter of a pair
of shoes made so thin by O'-
Shaughnessy, in St. Jame's Street,
that they were as light as brown
paper; what a pity they were lined
with pink satin and were quite
the go; put on a pair of Hoby's;
over-did it in perfuming my hand

kerchief, and had to recommence
de novo; could not please myself
pear at a rather late date, first
in tying my cravat; lost three
quarters of an hour by that, tore
two pairs of kid gloves in putting
them on hastily; was obliged to
go gently to work with the third;
lost another quarter of an hour
by this; drove off furiously in my
chariot, but had to return for my
splendid snuff-box, as I knew that
I should eclipse the circle by it."
Hats Late
In women's fashions, hats ap-
pear at a rather late date, first

turning up as riding hats in Eliza-
bethan times.
They seem, Laver says, to have
a significance more than merely
fashionable, for large and elabor-
ate hats such as appeared just
before the French revolution and
again before World War I often
seem to be connected with major
social upheavals.
Bonnets Indicative
Bonnets, on the other hand, are
indicative of submission to male
authority. "They are the natural
outdoor wear of the Victorian sub-
missive woman, with her full skirts
and flat-heeled slippers."

lo R I G I N A O
Will, tand O t, ..

I

n the Easter Parade

V

4

4

I

ti

t

Flattering feminine styles. Fashioned in
the new exclusive Mello-Glo.
Soft, durable leather. All of Spring's
fashion colors are available. Best of
all, just imagine being able to wash

4
Y

leather. Now it can be done,
and at such popular prices.

from

BELTS
That all-important

This Is Joan

FOR SPRINGVACATION

As Easter fresh as her bunny.
Her dress for the "parade"
is a silk cepe sheath
with a crush of polka dots
on the cummerbund and
the baby bow at the neck.
Black with red
Navy with red... $25
Just Show Your I.D. and Charge It at
FOR TOWN AND COLLEGE
302 South State Street

FASHION TIP:
in belts by Sch
for separates it

ACCESSORY
Leather is the thing for Sp
offer. Distinctive styles ideal
n an array of all the wanted '
$1.00 to $5.00

Large Selection of Metal Belts

Use Our Lay-Away Plan or Charge It
Also Convenient $1.00 Weekly Budget Plan.
Wilkinson Luggage Shop
327 S. Main St. Phone NO 3-4013
OPEN DAILY 9 to 5:30-MONDAYS 9 to 8:30

ring . E
ly suited
colors.

w'

4' ''

I=

1.

Pre-Season
SALE
Entire Stock
of{.
Ladies' ...
Swim Suits.:
1/3OFF

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