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March 07, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-03-07

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Swirmers

Take Huge Lead i n

Conf.erence

Mee

SCORES TWICE IN LATE RALLY:
Hutton Paces Icers to Win over MSU

Double Score on Second-Best Buckeyes;
Tashnick Breaks Records in Two Events

By TOM WITECKI
Special to The Daily
EAST LANSING -- Sparked by
John Hutton's two last period
goals, Michigan's hockey team
scored a 4-2 comeback victory over
Michigan State last night before
a crowd of 3,200 at the Spartan's
Ice Arena.
The Wolverines will be trying
to even the season's series at two
games apiece when they face off
against Michigan State tonight at
8 p.m. in the season's finale at
the Michigan Coliseum.
It looked as if Michigan would
lose another hard fought game'
last night, until late in the third
period when Hutton, a lanky senior
playing his next-to-last game in a
Michigan uniform, took charge.

At 14:42 of the final period with
Michigan's hopes for a win fading,
Spartan defenseman Ed Pollesel
picked up his third penalty of the
night for an illegal check and
Hutton scored seconds later.
Taking a perfect pass from Bob
White, who had just won a faceoff
to the left ,of the Spartan net,
Hutton blasted home a long screen
shot from the right board that
Michigan State goalie Joe Selinger
never saw.
Then with just a minute and a
half remaining in the contest, Hut-
ton, in a beautiful exhibition of
stick handling, swept into center
ice, went around two opposing de-
fensemen, faked Selinger com-
pletely out of the play, and tucked

(Continued from Page 1)

S PORT-WHYS
T. Yu Pilone4
Take. Your Pick

the winning goal in the open cor-
ner of the net.
Michigan State pressed seriously
for a tying goal, and pulled its
goalie with a little over a minute
left in the contest, but the strategy
backfired. The Wolverines stole
the puck in their own territory
and shot it up to center ice where
Steve Bochen slid a long shot into
the open net that clinched a Mich-
igan win.
Another senior who played a big
part in the Michigan win was
goalie Ross Childs, whose fine play
in the nets enabled the Wolverines
to stay only one goal behind the
Spartans throughout most of the
second and third periods. The
Michigan goalie's saves sometimes
bordered on the spectacular as he
made a total of 28 stops to Seling-
er's 20.
The win was particularly pleas-
ing for Michigan coach Al Ren-
frew, as it was the first time since
he took over the Michigan coach-
ing job tow years ago that one of
his squads was able to pick up a
win against the Spartans on their
home ice.
Renfrew, obviously pleased with
his team's performance, said that
he was especially happy the way
his outnumbered squad (12 to 18)
outskated the Spartans in the final
period.
Michigan had taken a 1-0 lead
at the 6:48 mark of a free skating
first period when Dale MacDonald
took a pass from Gary Mattson in
front of the Michigan State goal
and whipped home a short back-
handed shot that cleanly beat Se-
linger.
However, the Spartans main-
Hocke y,
Michigan Michigan State
Childs G Selinger
Bochmn W Hamilton
Cushing W Moroney
White C Polano
Mateka D Pollesel
Watt D Norman
Spares: Michigan: Mattson, Mac-
Donald, Hutton, Gourley, Neilson,
Hayton. Michigan State: Mustonen,
MacKenzie, 'Deizuono, Roberts, La-
coste, MacDonald, Christopherson,
Armstrong, Miller, Ozybko, Hurby.
First Period: Goals: Michigan: Mac-
donald (Mattson, Hutton) 6:28. MSU:
Moroney (Norman) 16:12. Penalties:
Mattson (hooking) 1:35; MSU: Nor-
man (elbowing) 17:18.

tained pressure and knotted the
score on one of the season's most
unusual goals. Terry Moroney of
the Spartans picked up a loose
puck at center ice and raced
toward the Wolverine goal. It ap-
peared that Moroney had been
ridden off the puck by a Michi-
gan defenseman, and when Childs
came out to cover the puck, the
situation appeared under control.
But to the amazement of all, in-
cluding Childs and Moroney, the
puck somehow trickled into the
Wolverine net.

The Michigan team completely
overran the already badly worn
competing teams with another
record win in the 400-yd. freestyle
relay. Carl Woolley, swimming the
second relay position, came from
behind to give the Wolverines the
commanding lead for the remain-
der of the race. Frank Legacki,
anchoring the team, touched three
seconds under the Big Ten mark
established by Michigan's 1954 re-
lay squad.
Legacki, however, was disap-
pointed in the 50-yd. freestyle. The
laureled sophomore, who has been
so spectacular these past few
weeks, failed to qualify in the 50-
yd. freestyle. The winner in the
event, Iowa's Gary Morris, whom
Legacki had beaten in an earlier
meet, was timed in 22.2.
Ohio State, once again proved
invincible in the dive, although
Michigan's Joe Gerlack threatened
to wrest the title from their too-
tight grasp.

STATISTICS
200-yard Backstroke -- 1. Frank
McKinney, Ind. 2. Richard Beaver,
Ind. 3. ALEX GAXIOLA, MICH. 4.
Tom Murray, OSU, 5. JOHN SMITH,
MICH. 6. Owen Ackerman, Ill 2:01.8.
(Betters American mark of 2:04.1 by
Charles Bittick, Long Beach College,
1958: and NCAA time of 2:05.1, 1953,
and Big Ten time of 2:06.1, 1955 both
by Yoshi Oyakawa, OSU.)
220-yard Freestyle -- 1. Bill Steu-
art, MSU, 2. DICK HANLEY, MICH.,
3. ANDY MORROW, MICH., 4. George
Onekea, OSU, 5. William Van Horn,
OSU, 6. John Parks, Ind. 2:04.2.
100-yard Breaststroke - 1. Frank
Modine, MSU, 2. RON CLARK, MICH.
3. Jerry Miki, Ind., 4. CY HOPKINS,
See 'Em Win
The remaining finals of the
Big Ten swimming champion-
ships this afternoon will be
shown on WJIM-TV.
The broadcast will originate
from the new Michigan State
Natatorium at 2 p.m. WJIM can
be received by good sets in this
area over channel 6.

THE TIME has come again for Midwestern sports writers to stick
their necks out and select the 1959 All-Big Ten basketball team.
And as usual it won't be easy.
The Big Ten, always a balanced league sporting few super-stars
but a number of fine players, seldom has any "outstanding five." In
fact, it usually is more like an "outstanding fifteen."
But the sports writers have to face the task, so they plunge head-
long into the fray and pick their own "dream five." And a study of
their dreams turns up a number of nightmarish problems. There are
four common mistakes made when the experts approach such selec-
tions. First of all, they are attracted to the boys that are on top of
the scoring column (often they take the top five scorers without
blinking their eyes), but they seem to forget other important attributes
like rebounds, defense, and play-making. The next error commonly
made is choosing players from only the top teams, or being influenced
by the feeling that every top team must be represented on the all-star
squad. And of course, such a feeling this year would mean that all
five would have to be Spartans, since they are the only top team.
Another common practice that makes little sense is the selection
of seniors only, stemming simply from the sentimental idea that it's
their "last chance" Granted, experience is a valuable asset, but so is
talent. Another problem that develops in the selection of teams is
the choie between taking the top five players, or being forced to go
strictly by positions. The guidepost here should simply be the question:
would the team selected function or not? Could they play together as
selected?
However, the goal either way is simply: select the five players that
would make the best team.,
The Big Three.. ..
A SURE BET to make every team this year is Johnny Green. The
"Jumping Jack" from Michigan State meets all the criteria with
flying colors: he is one of the top scorers in the Big Ten with'a
20-point average, the second best rebounder (while playing alongside
the fourth), and perhaps the best defensive player in the Conference.
And he will be aided in making everyone's team since he is from the
best team and is a senior.
Of course, there are other centers in the league, but they don't
quite compare to Green-whom MSU coach Forddy Anderson claims
is "worth 50 points a game to us." Lanky Joe Ruklick, Northwestern's
fine ?shooting center, is also adept on rebounds and defense, but he
can't dominate a game like Green. Other Big Ten centers are primarily
specialists: Iowa's Nolden Gentry can rebound with the best, Illinois'
John Wessels is a fine hook-shot man, and Indiana's Walt Bellamy is
simply BIG. However, none of these stars will make the first team, at
center or forward.
The two forward spots will be filled, on almost every expert's team,
by the two top scorers in the Big Ten-Michigan's M. C. Burton and
Ron Johnson of Minnesota. Burton, judging from the statistics, is
THE BEST player in the leaguee-the top scorer and rebounder, as
well as a formidable defensive player. Johnson, second in the Confer-
ence scoring race, is also high in rebounding and has moved into the
center slot on defense to handle the Conference's "big" men.
So it seems that the experts won't have too tough a time choosing
the front line for their team.
Lots of Others .:..
BUT FROM THERE ON it isn't easy. There are a lot of challengers
, for the other two positions, and one mustn't be restricted to just
guards, since many Big Ten forwards could play outside, too. The fore-
most challengers, of course, are the other top scorers. Iowa's Dave
Gunther and Purdue's Willie Merriweather, both forwards, and OSU
guard Larry Seigfried fill out the top five in Big Ten scoring behind
Burton and Johnson. The chances are that Gunther will be dropped
by most of the experts, since he is primarily a shooter, while Gentry
and Clarence Wordlaw do the rebounding and defensive work for the
Hawkeyes. Merriweather, on the other hand, is an all-around player
who would make a far better backcourt man than Gunther. Seigfried,
only a sophomore, has been the most consistent scorer in the Confer-
ence from the guard position.
Most of the other Big Ten standouts-the men who will fill in
the second and third teams-have been less consistent than the above
five. Along with Ruklick and Gunther on most second teams will be
somebody like Bob Anderegg of Michigan State (tops on defense, and
a consistent scorer), Frank Radovitch from Indiana (a fine shot and
rebounder), Northwestern's erratic Wille Jones (capable of scoring
frtom 2 to 42 points a game, plus getting rebounds from men twice
his size), Illinois' Governor Vaughn (best man on a fine all-around
team), and perhaps Spartan Horace Walker (the rebounding machine
that backs up Mr. Green).
And no one can leave out one of the finest second-best players on
any team in the Conference: Michigan's George Lee. In fact, there are
nights when he completely overshadows the league's leading scorer
and rebounder at both functions. Recently moved back to guard, Lee
is available at either position on the all-star teams.
And Even Some More . .
.AND YET A third Michigan man will be making a strong bid for a
guard berth. John Tidwell, the sophomore flash who can score way
In 'the 30's when needed, is the second highest scoring guard in the
Conference behind Seigfried. Other leading candidates for the back-
court spots are Illinois' flashy Roger Taylor (whose shooting last Mon-

MICH., 5. Bill Fingleton, MSU, s.
Rock Sherer, Ill. 1:04.8. (Betters Mo-
dine's NCAA time of 1:05.2, 1958, and
Big Ten mark of 1:05.5, Ron Clark,
Mich. in 1959 preliminaries.)
One-Meter Diving -- I. Sam Hall,
OSU, 488.45. 2. Ron O'Brien, OSU, 3.
JOZEF GERLACH, MICH. 4. DICK
KIMBALL, MICH.,5. Estel Mills, Iowa
6. Nat Smith, OSU. -
200-yd. Individual Medley - 1.
TONY TASHNICK, MICH. 2. Joe Hun-
saker, I11. 3. William Barton, Ind., 4.
CY HOPKINS, MICH., 5. Orville Pe-
terson, Minn., 6. Richard Beaver, Ind.
2:06.5 (Betters Tashnick's preliminary
time of 3:06.8 which bettered former
American and NCAA mark of 2:07.5
by Al Wiggins, OSU, 1957 and Big
Ten mark of 2:08.3 by Wiggins in
1956.)
400-yard Free-Style Relay -- 1.
MICHIGAN (JOHN McGUIRE, CARL
WOOLLEY, DICK HANLEY, FRANK
LEGACKI), 2. Iowa, 3. OSU, 4. MSU,
5. Ind., 6. Wis. (Betters old Big Ten
mark of 3:23.8 by Michigan in 1954.)
50-yard Freestyle - 1. Gary Morris,
Iowa, 2. Westphal, Wis., 3. McGUIRE,
MICH. 4. McPhee, OSU, 5. WOOLLEY,
MICH., 6. Connell, OSU. :22.4.
200-yard Butterfly - 1. TASHNICK,
MICH., 2. Barton, Ind., 3. GILLAND-
ERS, MICH., 4. POMGRANCZ, MICH.,
5. Stagman, OSU, 6. NATELSON,
MICH. 2502.7.

RON CLARK
..- sets record
Conference
Heads Like
.Bowl Game
By The Associated Press
MADISON - The Big Ten yes-
terday demonstrated its desire to
continue in the Rose Bowl foot-
ball game by gaining a majority
affirmative vote from its Faculty
Representatives and Athletic Di-
rectors,
The recommendation, in the
form of a resolution, authorizes
negotiations with the new asso-
ciation of western universities,
which supplants the Pacific Coast
Conference, and the Tournament
of Roses Committee.
It now goes before the Faculty
Councils of each Big Ten member
for certification. The matter will
be voted upon officially at the
Big Ten May meeting at the Uni-
versity of Michigan.
The present contract was for
an indefinite period and was end-
ed when the PCC served notice
last August that it was disband-
ing. The new association is made
up of California, Southern Calif-
ornia, UCLA and Washington.
It was learned that the West
Coast officials did not want to
issue a formal invitation to the
Big Ten to continue in the Rose
Bowl unless they were certain it
would be 'accepted.

COCME TC) ilJR"Cr I

ON

T HE B AT rfH

JOHN HUTTON
two big tallies
Statistics
Second Period: Goals: MSU: Polano
(Pollesel, Norman) 13:37. Penalties:
MSU: Pollesel, ()holding) :58; MSU:
Polano (body checking) 6:24; Michi-
gan: Cushing (holding) 7:58; Michi-
gan Bochen (tripping) 11:44; MSU:
Pollesel (hooking) 18:46.
Third Period: Goals: Michigan:
Hutton (White) 14:45; Hutton (un-
assisted) 18:31; Bochen (Hayton, Hut-
ton) 19:22. Penalties: MSU: Arm-
strong (roughing) 3:57; Michigan:
Hayton (roughing) 3:57; MSU: Pol-
lesel (illegal check) 14:42.

Saves
Childs (Mich.)
Seiinger (MSU)

1 2 3 T
8 9 11 28
7 5 8 20

IN THE .MAJORS:
Exhibition Baseball Starts Today

By The Associated Press,
The major league baseball ex-
hibition season opens in Florida
and Arizona today with all 16
clubs facing problems they hope
will be ironed out in the next
month.
Even pennant-winning manag-
ers Casey Stengel of the New
York Yankees and Fred Haney of
the Milwaukee Braves have their
work cut out for them before the
start of the regular season, April
9.
Top contenders and their woes:
American League - 'New York
will have to settle for mediocre
pitching unless Whitey Ford and
Don Larsen can stay healthy all
year. They have had sore arms
for the last two seasons. Tony
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
tion. Sponsored by American National
Red Cross.
The Summer Placement Service has
the addresses of contacts for summer
work in National Forests in all parts
of the United States.
The Wurzburg Co. of Grand Rapids
has positions for girls on the College
Board.
Kamp Kohut, Oxford, Maine has po-
sitions for men counselors with skill
in such fields as tennis, golf, swim-
ming, newspaper, or photography.
Tues., March 10:
Camp Duncan, Round Lake, 111.will
be interviewing boys for YMCA camp
staff.
University of Mich. Speech Camp will
interview boys for camp work.
Camp Takona, Ann Arbor YWCA, will
interview girls for this near-by camp.
Mr. Dittman will interview boys in-
terested in working for Ann Arbor
YMCA Camp.
Interviews:
Thurs., March 12
Camp Lenore, Hinsdale ,Mass., a pri-
vate girl's camp, has openings for
waterfront positions, sailing counselors,
elementary education majors to work
in the Junior unit.
Fri., March 13:
Illinois YMCA Camp, Camp Duncan.
Mr. Paul Gitlin of Camp Wise,
Painesville, Ohio, will interview both
boys and girls interested in general
counseling, arts and crafts, camperaft,
swimming.
Personnel Requests:

Kubek, in the army till late Ap-
ril, will be of no help for the first
months.
Chicago's chief weakness will
be at firs tbase unless Sherman
Lollar can make the switch from
catcher. A lot depends on rookie
Johnny Callision, a highly touted
outfielder.
National League - In addition
to getting Red Schoendienst's re-
placement, the Milwaukee Braves
need a better year from Ed Math-
ews, who only hit .251 last season.

Pittsburgh - Although the club
still has a powerful offense, Frank
Thomas' big bat may be missed.
Today's Schedule
Cincinnati vs. Chicago (A) at Tampa
sota
Philadelphia vs. Los Angeles at Sara-
St. Louis vs. New York at St. Peters-
burg
Milwaukee vs. Pittsburgh at Ft. Myers
Chicago (N) vs. Boston at Mesa, Ariz,
San Francisconvs. Cleveland at
Tucson, Arizona
Kansas City vs. Baltimore at W. Palm
Beach
Washington vs. Detroit at Orlando

TODAY-.. .

FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:00 and 11:30 Meeting for worship.
10:00 Sunday school and college discussion.
11:30 Adult discussion.
7:15 P.M. Young Friends.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgwood
Lester F. Allen, Minister
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service.
6:30 P.M. Worship Service.
FIRST BAPTISTCHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks and the Rev. Hugh D.
Pickett, Ministers
Mrs.CGabrielle Bublitz, Assistant Student
Counsellor
Church Services at 9 and 11 A.M. Dr. C. H.
Loucks preaching on: "The Mission of the
Church."
StudentrBible Class at 9:50 A.M.: Study of the
Gospel of John.
Student Fellowship meets at 6:45 P.M. at Guild
House. The Rev. Frank Fitt will speak on
"A Faith That Makes a Difference."
Informal Bible Study in the Book of Ephesians at
4:15 P.M. on Tuesday in Guild Lounge.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY-
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship Services.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
7:00 P.M. George Saffoury, Lebanon, Speak-
er: "The Near Fast."
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 A.M. Communion.
7:15 P.M. Lenten Service.
FRIDAY-
7:15 P.M. Graduate Group - Prof. G. E.
Lenski, Leader.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
Morning Worship: 10:45 A.M. The Christian
News: Reyelation of God. Rev. Russell Fuller.
The Student Guild will hear Rev. Fuller: "The
Liberal View of Christianity" at 7:00 P.M.,
Memorial Christian Church.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fpurth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Minister
9:30 A.M. German Service.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
8:45 A.M. and 11:00 A.M. Sermon by Pastor
Bennett.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School-University Class.
5:45 P.M. Student Guild.
7:00 P.M. Sermon by Pastor Bennett.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. "Man."
A free reading room is maintained at 339 So.
Main Street. Reading room hours are Monday
I1:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M., Tuesday through
Friday 11:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; Saturday
9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M. Church School. Adult Group - Sum-
mer Conference Values.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service. Sermon-"Reach
ing for the Stars."
7:00 P.M. Student Group-Douglas Crary show-
ing films of Africa. Public Invited.
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
at the First Presbyterian Church
1432 Washtenaw Avenue, NO 2-3580
Miss Patricia Pickett, Acting Director
Robert Baker, Assistant
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 12:00. Mr. Van
Winkle preaching, "One Great Hour of
Sharing."
10:30 A.M. Seminar, "Barriers to Beliefs."
11:30 A.M. Coffee Hour.
5:30 P.M. Student supper.
7:00 P.M. "The Nature of Revelation."
TUESDAY-
9:30 P.M. Coffee Hour at Pat Pickett's
dportment, 217 S. Observatory.
WEDNESDAY-
4:15 P.M. UCF Midweek worship at the
Congregational Chapel.
7:30 P.M. Midweek Lenten Service.
FRIDAY-
5:30 P.M. Leave for worship retreat at
Camp Storer.
6:30 P.M. Graduate supper and program.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Theo. A. Kriefall, Vicar
Sunday at 9:15 A.M. and 10:45 A.M.: Services,
with sermon on "Man's Word, Yet God's
Word." (Holy Communion in both services)
Sunday at 9:15 A.M. and 10:45 A.M.: Bible
Study Groups..
Sunday at 6:00 P.M.: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu.
dent Club, Supper and Program. Movie, "The
Bearer of the Book." International students
invited as guests of Gamma Delta.
Wednesday at 7:30 P.M.: Midweek Lenten Ves-
pers.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
9:30 A.M. University Bible Class.
10:30 A.M. and 7:00 P.M. The Reverend Samuel
Van der Jagt of Detroit will preach at both
services.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 3-0982; Office Ph. NO 87421
10:00 A.M. Morning Service.
7:00 P.M. Evening Service.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Hoover Rupert, L. Burlin Main,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship: "Ours is an
Amazing Gospel"
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson] Assistant
Sunday Masses 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M. and
12:00 noon.
Holyday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M,
12:00 noon and 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 AM.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.

4
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