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March 06, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TAT+ Mi t' Al r a gat in a TT.v

__________________________________________________________1111RB.4┬▒YK lip.' AI~1 N "fKNi

FRIDAY, MARC

IN LANSING TODAY:
Young Republican Clubs
To Hold Annual Meeting

Model Missile Housed Here

The Michigan Federation of Col-
lege Young Republican Clubs will
hold their annual convention today
and tomorrow at the Hotel Olds in
Lansing.
The keynote speech will be given
by Peter Smith, chairman of the'
Theatre Group
Pieks Sandler
T'o Direct Play
Jerry Sandler, a producer-writer
for the University broadcasting
service; has been named to direct
the Ann Arbor Civic Theatre's pro-
duction of John Drinkwater's "Ab-
raham Lincoln," scheduled for
April 17 and 18.
Previous to his University posi-
tion, he was production director
and instructor in the radio and
television department at Indiana
University.
To be presented at Ann Arbor
High School, the drama is re-
garded as "one of the finest pieces
of literature about Lincoln," by
Lincoln scholars and literary
critics. The Lincoln Sesquicenten-
nial Commission, co-:3ponsor of
the project, requested the Civic
Theatre to produce the play.
Reporting that thbre are parts
available for; 6 women and ap-
proximately 30 men, Saudler sug-
gested that anyone in the Ann
Arbor community is invited to
audition. Tryouts will be held from
7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Monday and
Tuesday at the high school.

National College Young Republi-
cans. This will be followed by the
nomination and election of officers.
The University Young Republicans
have one candidate running for
the chairmanship which is being
vacated by Henry H. Kerr, '59. He
is Thomas Rollis, the founder and
first president of the Albion Col-
lege Club and is now enrolled at
the University. He is running
against Dan McKinnon, the YR
president at Michigan State Uni-
versity.
The convention will start today
at 9 a.m. with a forum on "Politi-
cal Action for College Young Re-
publicans." Featured on the forum
will be State Representative Rus-
sell H. Strange (R-Clare), Law-
rence B. Lindemer, chairman of
the Republican State Central
Committee, Robert L. Hoard,
chairman of the Michigan Young
Republican Federation and Henry
H. Kerr, Jr., the retiring chairman
of the Michigan Young Republican
Federation.
Other business on Friday will in-
clude appointment of committees,
announcements and caucuses,
Tomorrow the committee will re-
sume their meetings which will be
followed by a banquet. fn the
afternoon, following Smith's
speech the convention will be con-
cluded with the elections. In the
evening the post-conventions fes-
tivities will include a dance.
Those leaving for the zonvention
fr'om the University can get rides
by going to the YR office between
the tours of 3 to 5 p.m. today.
Rides will also be available tomor-
row.

it
J
i

Department
Faculty Tells
About Russia
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the sec-
ond of two articles discussing the
experiences of Slavic language de-
partment members while traveling
in the Soviet Union.)
By NORMA SUE WOLFE
All the professors and two teach-
ing fellows of the Slavic languages
and literature department have
either lived in or toured the Soviet
Union.
In the fifth, sixth and seventh
grades of Soviet high school, Prof.
Temira Pachmuss was exposed to
Russian and world literature, alge-
bra, and trigonometry. She left
Leningrad in 1943, went to Ger-
many, attended college in Australia
and then came to the U.S.
"Under the present political'
system, everyone in the' Soviet
Union suffers," she said.
"On the basis of what I know,
it seems to me that both the
universities and high schools in
Russia offer a far broader curricu-
lum. I am not well acquainted with
your school system, but from what
I've heard, your schools lack disci-
pline, with a curriculum not as
broad," the native reported.
Norman Ingham, teaching fel-
low, is presently celebrating the
first anniversary of his visit to
Moscow and Leningrad. Last
March he organized a group of
students from ithe University of
Berlin to tour those two cities.
In Moscow, the group saw the
Kremlin and toured the University
of Moscow, a factory, and a new
apartment house.
"The people do seem to believe
the propaganda they hear. They
think that capitalism thrives on
imperialism, which means war. In
fact, many Soviets approached me
with the question 'Why is it that
you Americans want to war?'" he
said.
Teaching fellow Robert Magidoff,
a native of Kiev, studied at the
University of Wisconsin and re-
turned to the Soviet Union as
Associated Press correspondent in
Moscow.
I

)
44

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-Daily-Allan Winder
ROCKETS AWAY-This model of a Sparrow I guided missile, located in the north wing of East
Engineering, is an air-to-air beamrider missile whose primary function is to intercept and destroy
high speed jet bombers and fightefs.
CHAMBERS CLAIMS:4
Landscape Architect No Gardener

By LOIS BREYER

NEXT THURSDAY
OPENING NIGHT
PIRATES OF PENZANCEI

Lydk
Mendels
12, 13,
8:00

" ' Tick
sohn 1-5 f
14, -1.65
BUY YOUR TICKETS EARLY!

ets on sale
Ad. Bldg.
and 1.10

SEE IT!

I

The modern conception of a
landscape architect 'as a gardener
is false, Prof. Walter L. Chambers
of the architecture college noted
recently.
Landscape architecture deals
with the arrangement- of land
with the spaces and objects'upon
it to best fulfill the requirements
of utility and beauty, he ex-
plained.
Prof. Chambers, who came to
the University last year, is in-
terested in getting the public to
understand more about the field
of landscape architecture. Little
is known about the field because
the landscape architects have
never attempted to inform the
public of its nature, Prof. Cham-
bers continued.
Called New Field
For this reason many consider
the field a relatively new one,
although the ancient Egyptians
and Babylonians were among the
first to enjoy landscape architec-
ture.
During the beginning of the
century landscape architects
worked for the wealthy or on pub-
lic projects. Thus, only the very
wealthy or the low income classes
received benefits of a landscape
architect's services.
Prof. Chambers would like the
so-called "white collar workers"
to have the opportunity to get
this aid, he said. In order to do
this,, several new courses will be
offered in the department next
semester. Open only to students
not enrolled in the architecture+
college, these courses should give
future home . owners the back-
ground to be able to better plan
their own homes.
now available!1
HANDBOOK OF
NATURAL GAS
ENGINEERING
Donald Katz, Editor
McGraw-Hill Book Company

The courses to be offered are
Introduction to Landscape De-
sign, Home Grounds' Design, and
Simple Landscape Construction
for Home Grounds.
An entirely new set-up has been
instituted in the department this
year, Prof. Chambers said. There

Committee of the American So-
ciety of Landscape Architects
which accredits. There are eight
to 10 other schools which offer
some courses, in the field.
Few Receive Degrees
Not many students fulfill this
requirement. Prof. Chambers
noted he will continue to keep
the requirements strict..,
The department is small but, he
stressed, it is hoped that more
students will enroll in it..
Previous to teaching at the Uni-
versity, Prof. Chambers taught at
Harvard University, Lowthorpe
School and Smith College.
Prof. Chambers received his
B.I.A. from Ohio State Univer-
sity and his M.L.A. from Harvard
University.
In addition to teaching, Prof.
Chambers has had a private prac-
tice and hopes to establish a prac-
tice in the Ann Arbor area some-
time in the near future. He also
worked on Defense Housing sin
New Kensington,_ Pa., TVA, Vet-
erans Housing in Wellesley, Mass.,
Navy Housing in Quonset Point,
R. I., Otis Air Base Housing, and
three PHA housing projects

MASONIC
AUDITORIUM
DETROIT

FRIDAY,
M4ARCH 1
8:20 P.M.

A
presented
by
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
on MARCH 5, 6, 7, at 8:00
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
LAST PLAY OF THE SEASON
"SEE YOU AT THE LEAGUE"
Box Office Opens March 2-7, 11-5 P.M.
NO 8-6300

PROF. WALTER CHAMBERS
... landscape architect
is a new staff, since most of the
old members of the department
are no longer present due to re-
tirement or illness, he explained.
Prof. William J. Johnson was
also added to the faculty this fall.
The future is good in this field,
Prof. Chambers said. The projects
of a landscape architect are
varied and numerous: town and
city planning, parks, housing
projects, community c e n t e r s,
highways, airports, country clubs,
industrial sites and shopping cen-
ters, resort properties and play-
grounds and cemeteries are but a
few of the possibilities.
Submits Solutions
The professional landscape ar-
chitect submits a recommended
solution following discussions with
his client. This is done by the
use of written, reports, sketches,
models or a combination of these.
Many times topographicaltsur-
veys and maps, research into such
factors as climate, soils, vegeta-
tion, and water supply as well as
questions of traffic and popula-
tion trends; and land-use studies
and property values must also be
utilized.
At present there are only 14
schools accredited to give degrees
in landscape architecture, Prof.
Chambers continued.
He is chairman of the Education

s

ENDINGDIAL
ATU RDAYNO 2-3136
.LTHE EXCITEMENT OF THE PRIZE NOVEL?
GARYCOO0ER.MARIA SCELLKARL MALDEN,

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I

-

TODAY W DOORS OPEN AT 12:45 SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9:05 P.M.
SVERY BEWTCHING COMEDW ABOUT AH ENe{ANING BUBJEGT- sex

The
,TE C H N IC O L O R
FROM WARNERBo.

I

F

SUNDAY: "SHERIFF OF FRACTURED JAW"

p8-6416
p1A4
4 4

STARTING TODAY - WEEK DAYS at 7 and 9 P.M.
Continuous Saturday and Sunday from 1 P.M.

smart
alec...

I

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ta . 0
r , '
r tf! r tre I

Sheer madness and
all Guinness! The man's
a genius...want a
really champion show?
Take it from
the horse's mouth.

E

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