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February 26, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-02-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26,

Udani Compares Russia,
West Science Education

FINAL EXAMS STOLEN:
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Investigates Cheating

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"The educated Indian frowns on
c Russia because he knows of her
f past," he continued.
Speak on Panel
Speaking at the weekly
luncheon of the American Insti,
- tute of Chemical Engineers' chap-
1 ter here, a panel of six Indian
y chemical engineers attending the
t University called attention to
s problems facing an underdevel-
S oped India.
"We realize that industry is
necessary for an overpopulated
India," Trilochan Singh, Grad.,
commented. But we also realize
that it will take time to accom-
plish our industrial goals, he
added.
Cites Emphasis on Education
Mamu Tayyabkhan, Grad, said
e increased government emphasis
d on education will prepare India
y for an industrial society. The
h present government literacy pro-
- gram designed to educate the low-
er classes was offered as an
example.
Turning to the Pakistan-India
partition, Udani commented, "I
don't see any reunification of the
k two countries."
If Pakistan did come back to
India, it would prove a liability
e rather than an asset, he said.
"Pakistan is still trying to put
its house in order . . and it
s hasn't succeeded very well," he
e added.
Calls Results Dictatorship
Their efforts along these lines
have ended up in military dicta-
a torship, Udani said.
Comnenting on how the Indian
sees America, Tayabkhan said
United States' films are the major
contact with the Western world.
"The United States Information
Service is making an attempt to
educate India about America but
due to their limited resources, ef-
forts are very diluted," Udani
said.
Tayyabkhan dispelled. some
- Americans' view of India. "All In-
dians aren't . the real rope trick
fans .". . I myself am a flying
carpet man," he quipped.
Chapter president Norman Gu-
zick, Grad., acted as moderator of
the panel. Professor K. F. Gordan
of the engineering school was in-
strumental in planning the pro-
gram.

"ANYWHERE ANYTIME"

WILLIAM STEINBERG
.... to conduct

Symphony
To Perform
Here Tonight
The seventh concert of the
Choral Union Series will present
the Pittsburgh Symphony Orches-
tra at 8:30 p.m. tonight in Hill.
Auditorium.
Conducted by William Steinberg,
the 9rchestra will play "Eine.
Kleine Nachtmusik" by Mozart;
"Egmont Overture" by Beethoven;
Strauss' "Don Juan" and Bruck-
ner's "Symphony No. 6."
The orchestra originated in 1896,
and has since served under Victor
Herbert, Frederic Archer, and Emil
Paur. Elias Breeskin and Antonio
Modarelli occupied the podium
until 1937, at which time Otto
Klemperer took over. Soon after,
Fritz Reiner led the group, until
Steinberg became its director in
1952.
The orchestra remained in ex-
istence until 1911 and then was
revived and brought together again
in 1929.
In 1937 the orchestra was reor-
ganized into a major symphony
group under the leadership of
Klemperer.
Steinberg accepts a few invita-
tions each year to conduct con-
certs in several cities in Western
Europe and he has also appeared
as guest conductor with nearly
every major orchestra in the
United States.

The Student-FacultyeCabinet
of the University of Texas last
week moved forward in special'
session with its investigation of
scholastc dishonesty.
A cursory investigation by a sub-
committee of the Cabinet indicat-
ed that cheating during the Jan-
uary final examination period was
more widespread than official
records can indicate.
In the officially recognized gov-
ernment exam steal, seven stu-
dents have been apprehended and
convicted as ring leaders. They
were placed on suspension for
three to six semesters and are to
remain on disciplinary probation
should they return to the univer-
sity after their suspension period
is ended.
Questions, Answers Sold
Between 50 and 75other stu-
dents are on the discipline com-
mittee docket for trial for buying
or studying questions or answers
of the government final. In addi-
tion, some 45 paper trash bags
were stolen during the exam
period, and several professors of-
fices rifled for quizzes.
The discipline committee, com-
Law School
Holds Trials
The court is now in session.
As part of the framework of a
course "Trial and Appeals" taught
by Prof. Charles W. Joiner of the
Law School, a series of 14 trials
has been started this month. These
involve the trying of injury cases.
Student witnesses are acquainted
with the facts concerning an acci-
dent. They are then contacted by
attorneys, senior law students, and
are interviewed for the regular
trial.
Pleas are filed with the clerk
and motions are heard by the
judge,.Prof. Edmond F. DeVine of
the Law School. Final issues are
settled in pre-trial conferences.
Jurors drafted from the under-
graduates by teachers of the large
classes in Angell Hall are sent a
formal summons for the trial.
They judge the facts as the attor-
neys present them and decide the
case.
The cases are tried in Rm. 232
of Hutchins Hall,'the Law School
classroom* building. Jurors are
needed for the next trialtobe
held on March 4. All trials begin
at 1 p.m. Those interested in being
jurors are asked to come at this
time. Visitors are also invited.
Organization
Notices
(Use of this column for an-
nouncements is available to offi-
cially recognized and registered or-
ganizations only. Organizations
planning to be active for this
semester must register by February
28. Forms available, 2011 Student
Activities Building.)
Christian Science Org, Regular Testi-
many Meeting, Feb. 26, 7:30 p.m.,
League: check bulletin board in main
lobby for room number.
* * *
Congregational -Disciples Guild, So-
cial Action Luncheon, Feb. 26, 12 Noon,
Guild House.
Italian Club, Organizational Meeting,
Feb. 26, 3-5 p.m., 3050 F.B. Everyone
welcome.
Kappa Phi, Meeting with Prospective
Pledges, Feb. 26, 7:15 p.m., 1st Metho-
dist Church, Wesley Lounge.
Modern Dance Club, No Meeting This
Week Until Mar. 2, 7:15-9 p.m., Bar-
bour Gym.
SGC Public Relations Comm., Meet-
ing-New Members Needed, Feb. 26, 4
p.m.,y 1548 SAB.
Wesleyan Guild, Roller Skating Party,

Feb. 27, 7:30 p.m., Meet in Wesley
Lounge.
NIA Committee of SGC Ensian pic-
ture will be taken at 5 p.m. today in
the ITSIS ofice.

posed of. three faculty members,
one being from the department of
government, and two students
reached unanimous decisions as to
the penalties, Arno Nowotny, dean
of student life, said.
This committee is the Supreme
Court according ,to the Dean. They
are investigating persons involved
in distributing, (selling) finals of
other departments.
Members See Folders
Committee 'nembers are all
provided with a folder on each
student brought before them giv-
ing the student's grades, record
and the chargV.
"They are being as uniform as
possible yet are giving individual
consideration to each case," Dean
Nowotny said.
Several students who were dis-
missed from the university after
their hearings have protested
about the way in which their cases
were ,handled. Consensus was that
whether the defendant told the
truth or lied, his penalty was the
same. "We were told 'if you tell
the truth everything will be fine;
if you lie you are automatically
suspended'," they reported.
Claim Verdicts Already Written
The students said further that
they appeared before five people
who "already had their minds
made up, and with their verdicts
already written."
"This is," one student charged,
"to a great extent a political move
on the part of the University be-
cause with the legislature in ses-'
sion the University appropriations
could be wrecked with a scandal."
The Dean's office has refused to
comment on any of these accusa-
tions until confronted face to
face with these people.
SGC Appoints
New Heads
Of COmmittee
Five subcommittee chairmen
were recently appointed on Stu-
dent Government Council's Pub-
lic Relations Committee, accord-
ing to Ron Bassey, '61, chairman.
Ruth Engman, '62, was ap-
pointed secretary of the commit-
tee. The Special. Projects Chair-
man is Judy Kalb, '62, and Elaine
Portner, '62, was.chosen Displays
Chairman..
Further chairmen arei David
Partridge, '60BAd., for the Speak-
ers Bureau and Wendy ,Harris,
'60Ed., publicity.
The Public Relations commit-
tee will hold an organizational
meeting at 4 p.m. today in the
Student Activities Building, Bas-
sey said.
b'

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COMPREHENSIVE PROPOSAL:
Committee Proposes Rules
To Simplify Law Procedure

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The Joint Committee on Michi-
gan Procedural Review announced
the proposed new rules yesterday.
The proposals would simplify
procedure, permit rapid settlement
of many questions in advance of
a trial and limit the chance for
cases to be settled on technical
points rather than their real
merits.
The committee's proposals
would do four things: simplify the
serving of pipers on individuals
requested to testify in court;
standardize methods for jury se-
lection throughout the state; en-
courage consolidation of as many
DIAL NO 8-6416
ENDING TONIGHT
News**

claims as possible in a single trial
and permit judges to end certain
cases without protracted trials.
Prof. Joiner Heads Committee
The changes suggested by the
committee, which is chaired by
Prof. Charles W. Joiner of the
Michigan Law School, represent
the first comprehensive proposal
to overhaul Michigan procedure
in more than 25 years.
The abolition of distinctions be-
tween courts of law and equity is
one of the most significant legal
c h a n g e s. Currently courts of
equity handle divorce cases, in-
junctions and certain other types
of legal cases not requiring a jury
trial.
The new rules, while providing
a single form of action, would
preserve the right to a jury trial
where it now exists. Furthermore,
pre-trial conferences between op-
posing attorneys would be used to
narrow the issues in dispute and
deterimining the feasibility of pro-
ceeding with a jury trial.
Began in 1956
The State Bar, Supreme Court
and Legislature appointed the
Joint Committee in 1956 to form
the plan that they have just pre-
sented. The recommended changes
will give the public a chance to
obtain faster, more economical
and more even handed justice,
said Prof. Joiner.
By making procedure in Michi-
gan courts more similar to that
of the federal courts, time spent
by lawyers 'looking up the law'
would be reduced, headded. Pro-
posed changes could enable courts
to handle one-third smore cases
with no staff increase.
Th e changes could standardize
the entry and recording of judg-
ments, shortening the time for
requesting a new trial and cutting
bookkeeping costs, Prof. Joiner
estimated.
1

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