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August 30, 1968 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-08-30

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Friday, August .30, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Friday, August .30, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

anham:,0:
By BILL LEVIS but Canham also put in an im-
Associate Sports Eoitor proved lighting system at the
Jogging has become the craze of field, installed a new sprinkling
middle age men who are trying system and resodded the torn up
to improve their own physical Wines turf.
conditions. The athletic director noted a
Michigan's new athletic direc- little known fact that helps ex-
tor, Don Canham, has resorted to plain the black topping decision.
sprinting, however, to improve the "The band was given Wines field
physical condition of' the Wolver- 15 years ago."
ines' middle age athletic facilities. Canham emphatically stated
Canham on the run at the that the asphalting does not-affect
-NCAA indoor track meet when he the number of fields at Wines.
was appointed director last spring, "The band is going to use the
succeeding Fritz Crisler, hasn't northwest asphalted corner which
slowed down since. Usually dressed was largely underdeveloped any-
in permanent press Levi's and a wayh"
sports jacket or in golf clothes, To try to meet the tremendous
the Wolverines' new director has demand for outdoor basketball
initiated a multitude of ideas in facilities on the central campus,
his two months at the helm. tnhe athletic department, under
TOLATE Canham's direction, is going to
' TOO iaTEa' install several basketball nets at
The intramural department, the ends of the asphalt corner for
which has received a considerable student use when the band is not
amount of criticism from studentsseb
has been the direct benefactor of practicing.

and

running

FROSH FOOTBALL:
Namesakes renew old haunts

in over 25 years," he reported.1
"We have- also been doing thei
same to the squash and handball
courts.";
The main floor will be open fort
general use Sept. 16, while the'
handball courts re-open Sept. 3.'
The squash courts already are in
use.
These may be the only changes
visible at this time but Canham
has more up his sleeve to relieve
the overcrowded conditions that1
face the average athlete.
DEMOLISH STANDS
"Something we're going to have
to do is take out the Ferry FieldI
football stands," he noted. The
stands, which have been decaying
for approximately 40 years sinceI
varsity football moved to the
Michigan Stadium, will cost $75,-
000 to demolish. In there place,

The go-go director is even try-
ing to make the walk from !cam-.
pus to the Events Building more
attractive. A lighted walkway is
currently being installed.
Canham, however, has no plans
to build a walkway over the Ann
Arbor railroad yards which sepa-
rate the central campus from the
Events building. While he also has'
no plans to provide bus service
from the hill to the Events Build-
ing for basketball games, he stated
that "it is one of the things we
are looking in to, especially in
cold weather."
The varsity athletes have not
been left out of this massive im- DON CANHAM
provement program. New lockeraen
rooms have been constructed in afford the hockey fan a better
the stadium and Yost Field House, w of the action.
the latter fully carpeted. Canham plans to install plexi-
h glass along the sides this year
"ethpin ,- -

By ROBIN WRIGIIT
Elliott. R o s e m a. Seymour.
Fonde. Hilkene. Brandslatter. All
are familiar names to Michigan
football fans.
And all are returning to Mich-j
igan football in the form of fresh-f
min offspring.t
Included in the 30 tenders ex-
tended to freshman this year are
eight names connected with col-
lege football.
A feature to the team is Coach
Bump's nephew, Bruce Elliott-
the valedictorian son of former
Illinois grid coach Pete Elliott. A
6'1", 160-pound quarterback, the
younger Elliott captained two All-
State teams.
Coach Hank Fonde also has a
possible claim to fame in son
Chuck, who starred in an end'
position at Ann Arbor High.
A third familiar name added'
to the squad is Rosema-who re-
turns in the form of \6'4", 200-
pound end Bob Rosema-brother
of Rocky.
Mike Hilkene is another to'
bring back memories to Michigan
fans who recall his dad Bruce
Hilkene. The elder Hilkene was a
star tackle and captain during the
Elliott brother days.
A series of kin of former non-
Michigan grid-iron greats will also
appear on the freshman roster
this year.
Jim Brandslatter, a 6'3", 250-
pound tackle, has a tough family

record to match. Both his father
and brother won All-America
honors at Michigan State.
Another promising thug-sized
tackle, 6'7", 270-pound Leon Hart,
is the son of All-American full-
back Leon Hart. Sr.,.who starred
at Notre Dame.
Two of the Seymour brothers
wore Notre Dame uniforms, but
the third, 6'5", 215-pound Paul,
will be wearing a Wolverine jer-
sey. His cousin is Michigan end
Phil Seymour.
Two notables with names which
will become familiar within the
year are Dave Zuccarreli and Lee
Borel.
The number one back in Chi-
cago, Zuccarelli is a product of
Mt. Carmel where Michigan's new
offensive line mentor Frank Ma-
loney last coached.
At 6'5", 290-pounds, Borel's size
affords almost double replace-
ment for such tackles as former
NCAA heavyweight champ Dave
Porter.
Freshman coach Bill Dodd de-
scribed the recruiting program as
"not keyed to any single area of
concentration. -
"Last year we worked on bring-
ing out depth in the line. But
this year we worked in general
terms-feeling the team should be
well-rounded and able to offer
replacements in all areas."
Dodd added that because "we
haven't seen the boys play yet asI

several Canham decisions. While
you may argue that the improve-
ments have been too little and
too late, Canham has at least
1 done something.
The sports clubs have knocked'
him becausehe allowed a section
of Wines Field to be black top-
ped for use by the marching band

OVERCROWDED
While Canham has no quick
solution to improve the over-
crowded conditions at the Intra-
mural building, he has taken
steps to improve the caliber of
play.
"We are resurfacing the floor
in the main gym for the first time

W olverines seek berths
in '68 Summer Olympics

By TERRY VANDER LAAN
Fifteen Wolverine athletes re-
presenting countries from all over
the New World found strenuous
excitement this summer in pre-
paring for Mexico City's 1968
Olympics.
Competing in sports as varied as
their own backgrounds, all have
one thing in common: they are
'or were Michigan students.
Former Wolverine John Claw-
son is already secure in his berth'
on the U.S. basketball team.
Hoping to improve on his ,1964
silver medal in the 1200-mete but-
terfly, graduate Carl Robie may
be swimming for the United
'States. Junior Juan Bello who
surpassed Robie's 200-yard in-
dividual medley record, will try
to capture a slot on Peru's Olym-
pic swimming team.
Toronto's Olympic trials will
feature Wolverine gymnasts Sid
Jensen and Fred Rodney, chal-
* lenging 1963 Michigan and NCAA
all-around champion Gil Larose.
Jensen has placed second and
first in two previous trials.
Diving trials in Long Beach,
Calif., have attracted former

door champion Micki King. Lani
Loken, da.ughter of Michigan
gymnastics coach New Loken, is
also entered. Junior J y Meaden
and sophomore Dick Rydze are
also in competition for the Mexico
City trip.
Ron Kutschinski, a Michigan
senior, poses a strong threat in
track and field competition, being
rated as having a good change to
make the team.
In a recent time trial at the
Lake Tahoe, Nev., training camp,
Kutschinski finished third behind
Tom Farrell of the U.S. Army,
and Ron Whitney of the Los An-
geles Striders. Farrell's 600-
meters in 1:16.5 set a neW world
record. Kutschinski's 1:17.2 shav-
ed :00.2 off the old mark.
Other potential track team
Olympians include Kent Bernard,
graduate, Trinidad; Tom Robin-
son, graduate, Jamaica; Ergas
Leps, graduate, Canada; Francie
Kraker, senior, United S t a t e s.
Bruce McManaman, junior, Unit-
ed States will be going after a
position on the diving team, while
Tom Arusoo, senior, Canada, is
hoping to make the swimming

Cahm oest eet n o er u ne raining roomin I
anham hopes to erect one of the field house and we are put-
three mult i- purpose buildings
planned for the Ann Arbor cam-
pus.
"The stands would have come .1
down this year but we used the d aily
money to replace the scoreboards
in the stadium," Canham reveal-,
ed. "We just don't have the money,
He expressed the hope that the
stands will be down next year. NIGHT EDITOR:
The athletic director plans to PAT ATKINS
use the multi-purpose structures
for intramurals, physical educa- __
tion and varsity competition. TheyI
will be constructed on the site of ting in a new rubber floor in the
the Ferry Field stands, somewhere next two years. This floor can be
on the central campus replacing used by intramurals, track, base-
dangerous Waterman Gymnasium, ball, and football. We also plan
and finally on North Campus,!torput in rollout astro turf for
Canham noted.; spring football practice in, the
Intramurals is not the only track infield.
area that ,has been affected by "We even built new weight
the Canham touch. The former training and football squad meet-
varsity track coach, always one ing rooms under the baseball
step ahead of the competition, is ' stands. The squads used to meet
looking to the new Events Build- 'in the stairways in Yost," hej
ing as a money-maker. He said, noted.
"We're going to book the Harlem ANTIQUATED
Globetrotters in there in March." The antiquated Michigan Coli-
ENTERTAINMENT seum, which Canham calls "the
Instead of letting the $7.5 mil- most over worked building on
lion Events Building lay dormant; campus." is the scene of anothert
when it is not being used by var- 'improvement.
sity athletics, the new director is The chickenwire, fence sur-I
going to turn it into an enter- rounding the hockey rink, installed.
,tainment extravaganza. to protect the fans from flying
"Bob Hope is coming in Sept. pucks and the players from over-
20 and Harry Belafonte has also emotional fans, is making way
been booked," he noted. for clear plexi-glass which wil

and around the ends in 1969. I
All these ambitious plans take
money and no one knows that
more than the new athletic di-
rector.
While football sales have de-
creased across the conference,
Canham has waged a massive
advertising war to push Michigan
football sales above those of last
year.
Canham knows, however, that
catchy advertising alone will not
fill the stadium. Only winning
teams can and he is trying to do
something about that.
RECRUITINGr
The big thing to football suc-
cess is recruiting and Canham is
trying to organize over 3,000 var-
sity "M" club alumni across the
'country to help in the talent
search. I

Over the summer, the new di-
rector even ran a clinic, the first
in Michigan's history, for 75 re-
cruiters who have scouted for the
Wolverines for many years.
Another clinic will be held after
the football season to plan 'how
to recruit for next fall.
t Canham continues to run and
think of new ideas.
That must be one of the rea-
sons he is nearly always dressed
casually. How often do you see a
man run in a black business suit?
r . .-

practice doesn't begin until Sep-
tember 11, it wouldn't be fair to
make any judgments or predic-
tions.
"So far we have 60 boys, but
are encouraging anyone interest-
ed to contact us before the first
day of practice."
The 1968 frosh schedule includes
two inter-collegiate games. Bowl-
ing Green will host the mini-
Wolverines on November 1, with
the second game at home on No-
vember 15 against Toledo Univer-
sity.

BILL DODD

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