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December 07, 1968 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-12-07

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Scturday, pccernber 7, 1968

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, December 7, 1968

,-.---

theatre

PREPARE FOR FINALS!
OUTLINES
FOR ALL COURSES
SATER'S
336 S. State

Living Theatre: Revealing the art of barricades

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Installment No. 4 of Poor Richards:
Eng ish LanguageFilm Festival
TWO FILMS:
"NO LOVE FOR JOHNNIE"
--with Peter Finch as Johnnie Byrne, M.P.
AND A SHORT:
"MEN 0 WAR"

By RANDY JACOBS
When the Living Theatre first
returned to the United States in
November, they performed at
Yale University.-One afternoon
the directors, Julian Beck and
his wife Judith Malina met with
students and teachers of the
Yale Drama School. The ex-
change is reported py Stephen
Schneck in the November 30
Ramparts.
Robert Brustein, dean of the
school and a friend of the
Becks, and about half of the
students had begun with an old
idea of theater. Blrustein said,
"I'm afraid that r. artifice;will
always be a problem for (the
Living Theater). As long as
theater remains an imitation,
and it will always be an imi-
tation .
In his article Schneck re-
sponds, citing Antonin Artaud,
who wrote in 1924: "Why lie,
why try to place on a literary
level a thing which is the very
cry of life?"
And Julian Beck later said,
"We are trying to make theater

Sat., Dec. 7

-with Laurel and Hardy
9:00 P.M.

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ANN ARBOR

into life, and life into theater."
Beck;explained that the com-
pany had been in Paris during
the revolution of May. When
actors had gathered to discuss
ways of supporting the students,
their first idea was to do plays
in the streets. Immediately Ju-
dith Malina had said, "To do a
play alongside the barricades is
to degrade the barricades!
"The actuality there in the
streets far surpassed any false
theater . . . for us to present an
artificial play there was pure
ancien regime. It was over. You
couldn't do that."
Beck talked about the occu-
pation of the Odeon (Theatre
Due to unforeseen circum-
stances the Living Theater's
performance of "Antigone" on
Monday, Dec. 9th has been can-
celled. Tickets will be refunded
at the door or by mail (2220
S.A.B., U.M.).
"Antigone" will be perform-
ed at the Detroit Institute of
Arts on Friday, Dec. 13. Other
Detroit Institute performances
iare "Mysteries and Smaller
Pieces" (Thurs., Dec. 12) and
"Frankenstein" (Sat. Dec. 14).'
Tickets are still available from
the petroit Institute Ticket Of-
fice, 5200 Woodward, Detroit.
Phone /reservations (1-832-
2730) will be held for 48 hours
de France) by students and ar-
tists. "When the decision to take
over the Odeon was reached, it
was decided to turn it not into
a place where plays were done
or films shown, but to make it
into a place of live theater,
where everybody became an
actor. And what happened was
a 24-hour confrontation . . . a
debate ... a marathon perform-
ance. Anybody could enter off
the street and speak and receive
a response. There was great
ferment. . . . What °I saw at the
Odeon was the greatest theater
I've ever seen."
A month later the Living
Theater began its enactment ofY
Paradise Now, They described it
as a "collective creation."
It was clear that the theater
of the streets and factories had
gone underground for a while.
The actors of'the Living The-
ater wanted to make of them-
selves something "different,"
and equally necessary: a cata-
lyst for "the beautiful nonvi-
lent anarchist revolution" that
can begin, or be furthered in

CONFLICT OVER AUTONOMY:
Ed. board, 'U' consider plans

the mind and body at any mo-
ment.
The printed program for Par-
adise Now is a step-diagram of
rites, visions, locations, and dif-
ferent kinds of revolution in the
present and future.
The bottom rung is where we

are. our atmospher
The words for our location ex- -The final s
plain why the Living Theater ies," a victimiz
has ceased thinking in terms of like The Brig,
home and exile, and why they jective referen
now make the place where they happening and
and their audiences meet; "into tator to do t
a place of live theater, where terms.
everybody becomes an actor": -Antigone, i
"Ann Arbor: 100,000 people are organism is giv
living in a state of emergency." history enacted
Before Paradise Now the cre- action of thati
ations of the Living Theater times not a sin
were concerned with the state many, coincidin
of emergency. One after the At another tim
other, they took on a different but principles,t
aspect of Artaud's inescapable There is a to
demands for "a theater which of these manif
events do not exceed": and Brecht ar
-The Brig, in which actors are also the tE

ceased to repr
(called by Arta
or "puppets")
stead "victims,
and body to2
which it was t
to make real,t
animals that;

esent characters
Lud "straw men"
and became in-
yielding mind
a singular force
the play's object
(like the healthy
suddenly die in
e)
cene of "Myster-
ation which un-
provides no ob-
ce for what is
forces the spec-
his on his own
n which a social
ven bodily life, a
as the physical
organism. Some-
gle organism but
ng and diverging,
e, not organisms
or persons.
ension among all
estations. Artaud
re models; there
exts of the play

(Cont)nued from Page 1)
"not cogent" with the remainder
of the document. The arguments
presented, it maintains, are "rath-
er one sided."
"The prevelence of multi-cam-
pus arrangements in most of the
states is not mentioned. Nor is it'
recognized that many baccalaure-
ate state institutions in Michigan
have operations apart from their
main location, but which are not
considered 'branched' in the pejo-
rative sense implied by the State
Plan," the statement says.
However, Ross praised two sec-'
tions of the plans:
-a suggestion that the board
seek legislative action to provide'
sufficient funds for student loans.
-an assertion that out-of-state
studetts "strengthen the total
character of the student body an'd
give breadth to the campus cul-
ture by their individual contribu-
tions to the intellectual life of
the institution.'
,In order for the Legislature to,
make valid comparisons between
the various universities, the plan
recommends uniform accounting{
procedures and need definitions.-
"This suggestion only makes
sense," Ross says. "Its easier for
the Legislature if we are all talk-
ing theI same language."I
Generally, the report attempts
to relate the occupational needs

of the state for trained people
with vocational and professional
skills.
"America's rapidly -advancing
technological and scientific surge
focused attention on the need for
people with occupational abilities
and skill . . . . The colleges and
universities have a major respon-
sibility for educating students in
regard to societal needs as well
as preparing enrollees with occu-
pational abilities and skills."
To meet this end, the plan calls
for the establishment of indepen-
dent community colleges in all
areas of the state.
The plan also recommends the
solicitation of private industry and

interested departments of state
to join, with the universities in
increased reseoch programs.
"Those institutions that have
gained the greatest acclaim for
their contributions to society are
those that recognize research as
an important component of the
total educational program," it
says.I
Prior to 1963.dthe Board of Ed-
ucation was limited to primary
and secondary education, each in-
stitution of higher learning dealt
dircetly with the Legislature. The
state superintendent of public in-
struction served, in a limited way,
as the state agent for coordinating
higher education.I

that preceded\ Brecht's adap-
tation. And as translator, di-
rector, and actress, Judith Ma-
lina even adds a wry humor.
-Frankenstein, created over
a period of three years begin-
ning in 1965: a spectacle.
Artaud writes, "We shall not
act a written play, but we shall
make attempts at direct stag-
ing, around themes, facts, or
known works. he very nature
and disposition of the room
suggest this treatment, and
there is no theme, however vast,
that can be denied us," In The
Theatre and Its Double, he dis-
cusses:'
--"The Language of the Stage:
It is not a question of suppres-
sing the 'spoken language, but of.
giving words approximately the
importance they have in
dreams."
"Spectacle: There is an idea
of integral spectacles which
must be regenerated. The prob-
lem is to make space speak, to

feed and furnish it, like mines
laid in a wall of rock which all
of a sudden turns into geysers
and bouquets of stone."
Artaud's conception can be
grasped only through reading
his book. The aims of the Frank-
enstein spectacle coincide with
it in some respects, diverge
from it in others. A few seg-
ments of Frankenstein are faulty
in any terms. But it's certain
that this creation of the Living Y
Theater has made Artaud's
theater less impossible.
Towards the end of a long,
well-thought article Ross Wetzs-
teon writes: "Frankenstein is
one of those rare works df art
able to forego or at least dis-
place intellectual content with
out moving into the realm of
mindless supplictation . . . Like
The Brig, Frankenstein's elo-
quence lies not in what is rep-
resents but in what it is. In
short, the Becks have trans-
cended the theater of fictions."
-
Xon may
give position
to Romney
iContinued from Page 1J
mor, and power of Washington."
However, the transportation posi-
tion is a come-down from what he
had in mind last winter when he
campaigned against Nixon in the
New Hampshire primary.
Nixon appearedtat the gover-
nors conference late last n i g h t
and gave what was termed a min-
or policy speech to the governors.
He said "we're going to see to it"
that Americans now fighting in
Vietnam can come home to a na-
tion which can be united with
progress and opportunity for all
people.
Nixon said the U.S. has t h e
wealth to be the best fed, best
housed nation the world has ever
known and to share its prosper- ,
ity "more equally than any peo-
ple have ever shared."
He said the crisis now is view-
ed byobservers of America to be
a crisis 'of spirit. But Nixon said
that problem too can be over-
-come.
Another Republican governor
who is expected to b° appointed
to a cabinet post is Massachusett's
John Volpe. He was originally be-
ing considered for transportation,
which Romney apparently will get.
A Nixon aide last night dehied
that talks between' the President-
elect and New oYrk Gov. Nelson
Rockefeller indicated any change
in the attitude of the governor.
Rockefeller turned down a Cab-
inet offer a few weeks ago, al-
though he was considered a
strong prospect for state orde-
fense.

Clark deniies any censorship
of Walker Chi cago 'report

C ontin~ued from Page 1)
said the report "was very poorly
done and unobjective."
Ichord is chairman of a sub-
committee of the House.Commit-
tae on Un-American Activities
which is conducting hearings on
the Chicago disorders.
He criticized what he called a
rush to make the report public.
Dr. Milton Eisenhower, the
commission chairman, said last

MOE

NIUIOE.

-^ __ - _ - - --=- i

Sunday the panel had decided to
release the report because of
widespreadpublic interest.
The President's commissiontkept'
silent on the report which it re-
leased Sunday without comment.
Commission members gathered at
a remote manor in northern Vir-
ginia about 50 miles from Wash-
ington for .a three-day weekenq
session to start writing a progress
report to President Johnson on its
far-ranging probe of violence in
America.
Daniel Walker, Chicago corpo-
ration lawyer and head of a task
force ! that prepared the report,,
told a Chicago news conference:
"I should like to go under oath
here and now, a public and per-
sonal oath to the American peo-
ple, that my report was not{ re-
written, neither by Ramsey Clark

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PACKARD ROAD BAPTISTC
Southern Baptist Convention
1131 Church St.
761-0441{
Rev. Tom Bloxam
9:45 a.m.-,Sunday School
11:00 a.m.-Morning Worship
6:30 p.m.-Training Union,
7:30 p,m.-Evening Worship
FIRST CONGREGATIONALC
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Terry N. Smith, Minister
Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
Services at 9:15 and 11:00 a.m.

WORSHP
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastorx
Sunday at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Services,
CHURCH the Rev. Donald Mossmati, guest preacher. FIRST L
(Holy Communion at 9:30, a.m.)C
Sunday at 11:00 a.m.-Bible Study. CHURC
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta Supper. FOUND
r Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Devo- At Sta
tion. The Rev. Richard Kapfer, guest Churc
preacher. Wse
Wesle
Hoove
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST Bartle
W: Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann ArborHigh
CHURCH John M. Hamilton, Minister 9:00 ar
SUNDAY "Thin
10:00 a.m.-'Bible School 6:00 p,
11:00 a.m.-Regular Worship Tree t
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship
- "How WEDNESDAY 6:00 p.r

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"
'

FOREIGN STUDENT
UNION-LEAGUE ORIENTATION
Any students interested in escorting a foreign/student
during winter orientation please fill out the form below'
and mail to the UAC International Committee, Michigan,
Ann Arbor or call 662-4431, Ext. 22, Monday, Wednes-
day, or Friday afternoon.
I Name -
1 Ann Arbor Address Phone No. 1
1 Home Address 1
-_.... . - - - . __ _ _ ... . _ - - _ .

.eitain

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UNITED METHODIST
H and WESLEY
ATION
ate and Huron Streets
h-662-4536
y-668-6881
r Rupert, Minister
tt Beavin, Campus Minister

WhITFD

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nor anyone else.
0'It was not rewritten nor was!E asy way Out
even one change made in the sum- ayt
mary by anyone not a staff mem- (Continued from Page 1)
ber of the study team. No one "stations" in as little as five min-
except me and my staff edited utes..
the report. But don't expect your materials
"As for the report itself, there to be ready now if you elassified
were six prosecutable incidents, on Dec. 1.
all of which involved possible in- "We're not quite that fast," says
dictments of policemen which we Ernest Zimmermann,. assistant to
deleted from the report in order the vice-president for academic
not to preudice these cases. affairs and one of the major plan-,
"I am 'urging Chief Judge ners of early registration. But
Campbell to allow us to make those who classified in the last
public these cases. I am sending days of pre-classification should
the deleted material to the chief find their materials ready by the
judge for his consideration." last week of early registration.
The report is expected to "sug- Most of the students in -line in
gest that stricter law enforcement the old administration building
alone will not curb violence, but were there to "get it over with."
instead the 'nation must revive Several saw the line and decided
its respect for the law. to cone back another day.,
One freshman woman planned
to early register, skip the first day~
7", ~ 7of classes, Jan. 9, and not come

4

SUNDAY
nd 11:15 a.m.-Morning Worship.
k Big"-Dr. Rupert.
m.-Fellowship Supper, Pine Room.
rimming party and caroling.
FRIDAY
m. - Young Marrieds and Wesley
for dinner and caroling.

EMERGENCY -,KIT~
FOR COLLEGE GALS ON THE GO
" 3 Full Length RAINCOATS with hood
Fits into pocket or purse.
" 3 Large RAIN BONNETS .
* 3 Emergency SEWI >4G KITS
" 1 Pocket secretary with Pen, Pad,
Comb and Nail File

Wide Is Our World?"
CAMPUS C HAPEL2
1236 Washtenow
Donald Postema, Minister
10:00 a.m. - "He That Should Come - A
Savior."
11:00 a.m.-Coffee and conversation.
7:00 p.m.-Advent Candlelight Service of
carol singers, choral and instrumental
M usic.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Pastors: H. G. Kroehler, A. C. Bi er,
W. C. Wright
9:30 and 10:45 am -Worship Service
51:30 rind 10:45 a~m.-Church" School

Grads

7:30 p.m.-Bible Study
Transportation furnished for all
NO 2-2756

services-Call

i

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SUNDAY
11:00 a.m.-Daniel Moe Contemporary Lit-
urgy (Holy Communion). Sermon: "Christ
Brings Power To Love."
6:00 p.m.-,Smorgasbord.
7:00 p.m.-Fireside Advent Worship.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Dr. Erwin A. Goede, Minister
Phyllis St. Louis, Minister of Education
Sermon - "Transplantation, Abortion, and
Morality." Guest speakers: Edward Tank,
M.D.and David Youngs, M.D.
SRL at 7:00 p.m. Social at the Jognsons.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated with the Baptist General Conf.-

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8.00 -a m.-Holy Communion
9:00 a.m.Holy Communion and Sermon
11:00 a.m.-...Morning Prayer and Sermon
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer

Act NOW! DON'T DELAY!
One Kit $3.50 Plus 25c for Hdlg.& Shipping.
Two Kits $6.65 Plus 35c for Hdlg. & Shipping
Send Check, Cash or M.O. To:
SALLY JOY,
Box 134 A, Midwood Std..
BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 11230

'UNION-LEAGUE -
STUDENT
TRAVEL
SEMINAR
TONIGHT 7:30
ROOM 3-B UNION

back to scenic Ann Arbor until
late on Jan. 12.,
However, there was a catch. "I
have to come back to register for
gym," she said.

ii

ST. AIDEN'S EPISCOPAL
(North Campus)
1679 Broadway
10:00 a.m.-Discussion Group.
11:00 a.m.-Service.

CHAPEL

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UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 East Huron
Phone 662-3153
Minister: Calvin S. Molefyt
10:30 a.m.-"Love and Sacrifce" by Dr.
Calvin Mglefyt.
7:00 p.m.-Christian Coir Concert with
orchestra, -

CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
11:00 a.m.-String Quartet, "That Great Big
Santa Claus in the Sky."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.--Warship Services, Sunday School

SEMINAR ON PEACE
Where to begin on concrete action in
resolving con f lidt
Discussion with:SAUL JACOBSON
DAN HARRISON

r'
Boutique for the
Fashionable Woman -
at 611 Church st. in the
arcade. daily: 11 to5:30.
NEW
STOCK

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