100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 07, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Saturday, December 7, 1968

THE MICHIGAN: DAILY

Paige Th reP

Saturday, December 7, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three
NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION

FOX EAL RN HER ATFiON' LIMITED
FOX E AGVIL E ENGAGEMENT
375 No. MAPLE RD. '769.1300
J iNo M A L R . O U S A N D S D E M A N D
HE LD. A CHANCE TO SEE IT!

NATIONAL AIP
A Wallace party without Wallace

rN

9

POSITIVELY NO ONE UNDER 18 ADMITTED
TO THESE THEATRES DURING THE SHOWING
OF THIS WILD SOCK-IT-TO-ME MOVIE!
A F0OWAR0 1FIMSIM000 101
DANA
WYNTEB
SHeBAYMONU
ST IJACQUES
3 - KEVIN
. o -- McCADIVYII

I

WASHINGTON (A-Despite a A paid coordinator for Wallace 3 receiving "a few thousand dollars
total lack of direction from George in this year's presidential cam- a month-enough to keep us go-
C. Wallace's headquarters, Wal- paign is establishing a national ing." None of it. he added, is com-
lace backers across the country are I third-party mechanism in Los An- ing from Montgomery.
going to work to keep his third geles aimed at coordinating state In Montgomery, the Wallace or-
party movement alive. and local activity by supporters ganization is grinding toward a,
Whether Wallace's 45 electoral of the former Alabama governor. halt. Jones said only about 15
votes and his 13 per cent of the The coordinator, 27-year-old people are still on hand to han-
popular vote will provide suffi- Robert Walters, said he flew to dle the half-sack of mail that
cient impetus for establishing a Alabama last month for two comes in daily,
permanent American Independent days of conferences with Wallace's ON FINANCES
party remains to be seen. closest advisers, and was told that Jones claimed the organizatio
Third parties have a history of thewnae no pganiation establh is still just working out its fi-
disintegrating after the presiden- anationa oaasto in ont- nances and doesn't know yetl
tial election for which they are monmerh at least for five or six whether it will have any money!
formed. :left over from the campaign-or
But party workers in at least ,'JUST FADING OUT' where it would go if there is any.j
six states have already held post- Wallace himself has avoided: He said when the headquarters
election organization meetings, the press and said little about his is closed, Wallace himself will get
and similar gatherings are sched- plans, but Bill Jones, one of Wal- the files. The most important of
uled in eight more, lace's top strategists, agreed with these from the standpoint of any
There is talk in Arkansas, In- Walters. future organization contamnthe
diana and elsewhere of running "We're just fading it out as names of millions of petition sign-
candidates in state and local elec- fast as we can," said Jones of the ers, workers and contributors toi
tions under the banner of Wal- Montgomery headquarters opera- the Wallace campaign.1
lace's American Independent, or a tion. "We have no plans whatso- The Wallace group has not beenj
similarly named party, next year ever." sent any of the files, said Jones.
and again in 1970. "Since Montgomery is not going "They've been told just like every-
to be taking an active leadership body else, 'do what you think is
role nationally, we're setting up best for your situation.'"
an association of Wallace voters to In Delaware, the AIP thought
set up coordination," said Walters it best to throw out its Alabama-
i in a telephone interview. chosen chairman and declare some
I - i "We are attempting to hold the independence from Montgomery.

In about one-third of the
states, either the original petition
drive to put Wallace on the ballot
or his percentage showing in the
election is sufficient to qualify
the third party for the next state-
wide election.
The next meeting of a state
organization is scheduled for to-
day in Arkansas, one of five states'

I

I' ~ Udu~llBARBARA McN AI R
£ lotSpeia Gust SatApT RJJ IaU'. N l
$RF"4CRC ATU uIIIL
FATURE _. MON.-FRI.-3:15-9:20
FESN-1:0-3:00-5:10-7:15-9:20

carried by Wallace. The Arkansas
leaders plan to run a candidate
for governor in 1970, and they
want to start preparing now for
the campaign
SEGREGATIONIST
Principal spokesman for the
Arkansas party is Jim Johnson,
an outspoken segregationist who
as a Democrat lost the 1966 gu-
bernatorial election to Republican
Winthrop Rockefeller, and the
1968 U.S. Senate Democratic pri-
mary to Sen. J. W. Fulbright.
Floyd Kitchen, Wallace cam-
paign chairman in Missouri and
, now a member of the party's state
committee, said the all-volunteer
effort is aimed "at setting up the
vehicle which we can do since we
got more than the legal minimum
2 per cent of the vote."
FUTURE UNCERTAIN
Dr. Francis Sommer, newly
elected Kentucky AIP chairman,
said "it amounts to nothing more
than organizing the party and so
forth for the future. What hap-
pens in the future will depend
largely on w h a t Gov. Wallace
does. We'll just f e e 1 our way
along."
Indiana and North Carolina are
among states where Wallace lead-
ers are pledging to field a full
slate of candidates for U.S. House

I

THIS WEEK ONLY !

national organization together and
strengthen it until such time as
Montgomery reassumes national
control. We're not feuding with
Montgomery-we would welcome
them back."
The third party has tentatively,
scheduled a national meeting in.
Texas or Oklahoma for Jan. 11-12
to make plans-and possibly to.
decide whether to call itself the
American Independent party or
simply the American party.
Walters said his operation is
-- - -

A party meeting late last month
picked David Colatriano, 34, a
former Marine sergeant, to re-
place William O. Phillips, who got
only one vote.
FIGHTING COURTS
In California, the Wallace regu-
lars have been fighting a running
battle through the courts against
William K. Shearer, who broke
with Wallace and has been trying
to set up his own American Inde-

"FASCINATING
and GRIPPING!"
-Kenneth Tynan
London Observer
BOLD
and DAR ING!"P
-West German Press

Tired of Selling Out?
Sell in!!
at
Student Book Service
Best prices in Town
on books.
Saturday and Sunday
EAST OF
EDEN
dir. Elia Kazan, 1954
JAMES DEAN
Starring in his greatest role
Based on the novel by
JOHN STEINBECK
7:00 & 9:05
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
662-8871
75c

pendent Party. seats in 1970.
Walters estimated that an In Alabama, ironically, there is
American Independent Party-by no state AIP. There, the regular
that or another name-exists in Democratic party electors were
only about half the states, even pledged to Wallace and Democrat
though Wallace was on the ballot Hubert H. Humphrey was in es-
in all 50. sence a third party candidate.
NEXT WEEK-NEXT WEEK-NEXT WEEK
GO WEST YOUNG MAN
Thursday and Friday starring: MAE WEST
Dec 12, 13
Short: HIS MUSICAL CAREER (Charlie Chaplin)
The Lavender Hill Mob
Saturday and Sunday ALEC GUINESS
Dec. 14, 15 STANLEY HOLLOWAY
The best British comedy ever made
Laugh. it up during exams!

the d '
news today
b cy The Associated Press and College Press Service
THE U.S. ARMY announced yesterday draft calls
would be increased by 3,000 a month from March through
July to replace 20,000 reservists and National Guards-
men scheduled for demobilization.
At the same time, the Army indicated that an easing of
fighting in the Vietnam war might bring earlier release for
the National Guardsmen and reservists. As currently planned,
however, 10,000 of them will return from active duty to civil-
ian life by the end of next year.
If the Paris peace negotiations are successful, the sch-
edule could be moved up. It is also possible that the new pres-
idential administration may decide to reduce the over-all
size of the Army, now about 1.5 million men, in the event of
a war settlement.
If that happens, it is conceivable the draft calls may not
have to be raised.
MEANWHILE, VIET CONG and North Vietnamese
mortar and rocket attacks shelled 37 South Vietnamese
towns and cities yesterday in the heaviest attack since
last month's bombing halt.
The well-coordinated operation appeared to be a re-
sponse to the Viet Cong command's orders to launch a new
wave of attacks while negotiations in Paris drag on.
Rockets rained on five provincial capitals ringed around
Saigon, killing 16 and wounding 82 South Vietnamese per-
sons. 11 more were killed when Communist troops rampaged
a hamlet 60 miles north of Saigon, burning 25 houses.
0 .
WITH EXPANDED PEACE TALKS nearly ready to
begin in Paris, the United States and North Vietnam have
agreed on all points except the shape of the negotiating
table.
The allies want two rectangular tables, with the 'U.S.
and South Vietnamese negotiators at one end, and Hanoi and
the National Liberation Front spokesmen at the other. This
is because Saigon recognizes the NLF as only part of the
North Vietnamese team.
North Vietnam wants a square table, with the NLF on
one side by itself to show its status as an independent dele-
gation.
THE PENTAGON announced yesterday 12,000 Ameri-
can troops and 96 Phantom fighter-bombers will be sent
to West Germany for military maneuvers.
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization maneuvers will
be held near the Czechoslovakian border, as part of NATO's
response to the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia.
The war games will be conducted near Grafenwohr, West
Germany, and will last a few weeks before most soldiers re-
turn to the United States. Four Phantom squadrons, however,
will remain longer to complete additional training.
* 0" 0
TWO AMERICAN DESTROYERS will be sent to pa-
trol the Black Sea in the next few days, the Navy said
yesterday.
The announcement brought immediate protest from the
Soviet newspaper Pravda, which called the planned mission a
provocative sally close the Russian shores.
Although the move is seen as an American reminder to
Moscow that the Black Sea is an international body of water
and not a Soviet .lake, the Navy described the new mission
as routine,
No American warships have entered the straits leading
into the Black Sea since last June.
DEFIANT PARISHONERS IN FLORENCE, Italy, have
called on all Italian workers to stage a protest before
Pope Paul VI when he says Christmas Eve Mass at the
Toranto steel mills
The planned protest is over the ousting of a rebel priest,
Don Mazzi, who was dismissed from his parish Thursday for
publishing a controversial catechism. The catechism showed
Christ as a leader of the poor against the upper classes
The appeal to Italian workers came in the wake of a
march in which thousands of the working-class parishoners
demanded reinstatement of their priest.
" 0 *
REPUBLICAN GOVERNORS meeting with Vice Pres-
ident-elect Spire Agnew yesterday demanded the federal
government share more of its power and money with the
states.
In a conference at Palm Springs, Calif., the governors

asked for more state freedom in administering federal pro-
grams. Gov. Winthrop Rockefeller of Arkansas charged that
the Johnson administration had hurt the poverty program in
bypassing experts at the state house level.
Rockefeller joined others in asking President-elect Rich-
ard Nixon for "block grants" of federal money - funds given
with few strings attached.

Directed by
Dist/n'aished Broadwav Casts! MARCELLA CISNEY

I

I

____________________ -____________ ~i <

-II.

1!

This is a picture of the perfect embezzler!

Enjoy Yourself - Join
the Daly Staff Today!
The Endless
Summer
"Dazzling ode to sun, sand
and surf."-Time

i

e

Sat., Dec. 7
Elvira Madigan
"Perhaps the iost beautiful
movie in history." New Yorker
Sun., Dec. 8
Nobody
Waved Goodbye
"A marvelous movie."
-The New Yorker
Mon., Dec. 9
Nothing
But A Man

THE ARK MOVIE
OF THE WEEK

MOONRISE
Directed by
FRANK BORZAGE

He was that rarity of rarities, an uncompromising
romanticist. He imparted an aura to his characters,
not merely by soft focus and fluid camera, but by
a genuine concern with the wondrous inner life of
lovers. "Moonrise" is one of his masterpieces.

"A great movie. A revolution
in the cinema."-Life
Tues., Dec.

10

DEG. 1 1 l

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan