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December 05, 1968 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-12-05

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Thursday,.,December 5, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday,.December 5, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'URBAN SPRAWL:'
Problems of expanding city
to fa'e new county planner
By JIM NEUBACHER the country," Kramer explains. "You might say they are nation-
Population growth and the "ur- "This m a y involve considerable al problems," he added. "How-
ban sprawl" that will accompany chaos if definite planning and de- ever this doesn't necessarily mean
it will be crucial problems for the velopment aren't done early." the solution lies at the national
man who w ill replace Eugene Kramer will leave Ann Arbor in level."
Kramer, who is leaving his post' two weeks for a job with a private But if the existance of these
as county planning director. planning firm in Rochester, New problems is "discouraging," Eu-
"One of the great difficulties York, where he will be on the im- gene Kramer is far f r o m dis-
will be to supply municipal type plementation end of urban renew- couraged, and doesn't believe his
f services to developing a r e a s in al and planning development - successor should be either. The
what are now rural sections of perhaps going as far as planning Planning Commission and the new
'a whole new town from the ground director will have a proposed bud-
up. get of $152,000 to work with in
M c r c Cl, The "implementation" aspect of 1969, and will have definite prob-
fI ic Ir j his new job will be the major lems to attack.
change from his current position. Next year's commission pro-
p pdThe Washtenaw County Planning gram calls for a comprehensive
D0111ted, Director's job is currently one of study of recreation needs of the
p i advising the County Planning county, a study of the m a j o r
C eCommission and the County Board thorofares of the future, the cre-
CE A chief of Supervisors. ation of a Department of Public
Although Kramer never com- Works for the county, and the de-
(Continued from Page 1) plained about the limitation the velopment of a coherent, thought
advisory role puts on him, it is out plan of sewer development
University President Robben W. h ., h f by financed in part by federal grants.
iouJ h~%A hJ.. b U.fU. t~. td.~W b fInacdJ atbJfdrlg

SEI committee plans
program in ghetto'
By SAM DAMREN The students feel the existing
The Students for Educational framework of the education school
Innovation sponsored Student can satisfy most of the program's
Comitte o Uran ductio isimmediate needs, but feels the
Committee on Urban Education is Commission on Urban Education
presenting plans for an urban "ommusdin ondUrantEat
education program to the educa- "should not, and cannot, hesitate
tion school todaym to create new channels and pat-
T pterns of experimentation and edu-
Teproposals are a result of
two "brainstorming" sessions by :
the committee.I R~e istrat oil

I

Page Seven

THANO'S LAMPLIGHTER
WHERE THE FOOD
IS AS ZESTY AS
THE ATMOSPHERE!

I

The education school's Com-
mission on Urban Education, com-
posed of students, faculty and De-
troit community interests will
discuss the students' position
paper in today's meeting.
The Commission orginally asked
the student committee to con-
struct a position paper. Accord-
ing to student spokesman William
Berends, this allowed the students
to take the initiative in formulat-
ing the new program.
The student committee asserts
that actual experience in the
ghetto and free, constant dialogue
between student teachers and pro-
fessors are necessary elenients of
any successful urban education
program.
The committee has planned for
a short range program consisting
of several courses for next se-
mester, but has hopes that a fully
integrated four year program may
be implemented in the fall of 1969.

A new early registration sys-
tem began yesterday and will
continue until Dec. 20 in the
basement of the LSA Bldg.
Students may pick up ad-
vance classification materials
and return completed forms
between the hours of 8:15-11:45
in the morning and 1:00-4:30
in the afternoon. This process
completes registration for those
who have preclassified and do
not want to drop or add courses.
R e g u la r registration and
course changes will be handled
during the three days beforeI
the start of Winter term, Jan.
6-8.
cation in order to create a more
meaningful program.'
The student committee hopes
that a junior year program of
"living exposure and field experi-
ence" will be included in the ur-
ban education program.1

I

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,'i I'II

HEMCO Custom Tailors of Hong Kong
invte you to be measured for suits, coats, shirts, etc,
by our representative, Mr. G. H. Washi

at Holiday Inn-West
from December 6t

2900 Jackson Rd. (665-4444)
h-8th (FRI.-SUN.)

Fleming said yesterday, "The Uni-
versity is honored to have Paul
W. McCracken ... chosen to serve
as chairman of the President's
Council of Economic Advisors.
"His previous service on this
council, under President Eisen-
hower, and his career as teacher,
Sresearcher, and consultant to
business have given him broad
understanding of economic prob-
lems.
"We shall miss his services on
the campus, but wish him well on
fthis. new assignment of such im-
portance to the nation."
Two weeks ago McCracken was
made chairman of the 19 task
forces Nixon named to prepare
policy and program recommenda-
tions for the President-elect. Six
of the 19 were announced yester-
day. Their subjects range from in-
flation to crime and law enforce-
r~ment.
According to Ronald L. Ziegler,
Nixon's press spokesman, the re-
ports of the task forces will be
com'pletely confidential, with the
results disclosed only to the Pre-
sident-elect, his staff, and appro-
priate members of his appointed
cabinet. In addition, the task force
chairmen are apparently under in-
structions not to comment to the
press about the progress or find-
ings of their groups.

UVas e as geen lrusrauea py
the relative political impotence of
his position. "One of the impor-
tant things I'd like to see in the
future is the development of bet-
ter ways to put 'teeth into our
recommendations," he says.
For the same reason, Kramer
discounts the idea of creating joint
city-county planning boards. Al-
though he is in favor of coopera-
tion between urban and rural in-
terests, he believes' the county lev-
el is the place to oversee both.
"I'd like to see county govern-
ment have more power in the
fields of both urban andrrural de-
velopment," he says, "because the
power structure as it stands now
is archaic.
"Township governments a r e
throwbacks," Kramer continues.
"In almost every area of their
concern, county government could
do as well."
Kramer, who has worked in a
capacity connected with planning
in four different areas of the na-
tion termed "discouraging" t h e
existence of the same problems
all over the country.
"Although each area has prob-
lems that are peculiar to its own
location, water pollution, popula-
tion growth, and the need for re-
organization of government are
problems that exist everywhere,"
he said.

Kramer called his present job
"one of the finest opportunities
for any planner in Michigan." And
he emphasizes its importance.
"What we must keep in mind al-
ways is the thought that what we
do today will determine what kind
of county we have in the year
200.

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DAILY OFFICIAL Bt
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Senate subcommittee told
repair costs must rise
WASHINGTON 0:)-A Senate| down and otherwise require treat
subcommittee investigating the ment.
rising cost of auto repairs was told One witness blamed the peopl
yesterday they are going to keep who make new automobiles. An
rising, other blamed the people who bu
"The public must expect to pay them.
more, not less, for repair work," Norman Bennett of Washingtor
said Robert Straub of Cleveland, D.C., a member of the Society o
Ohio. representing the Independ- Automotive Engineers, said manu
ent Garage Owners. facturers were turning out dam
Service shops must offer higher age-prone cars in search of hig)
pay to attract and keep qualified profits from repairs.
mechanics, Straub added in ex- The motorist, he said, is "reall
plaining his outlook. being taken for a ride by th
The Senate antitrust subcom- manufacturers."
mittee, in its second 'day of hear- But Athell Yon of- Charleston
ings on the auto-repair industry, S.C., representing the Independen
again heard conflicting testimony Garage Owners, said buyers wan
on why cars get banged up, break cars with "all the comforts and
beauty which they admire" bu
That, he commented, is "de
Imanding the impossible."
L LET INLou Baffa of New York City
president of the Auto Body As
socitionof America, testified that
repair costs could be reduced con-
SUMMER PLACEMENT siderably if parts were designe
SERVICE on a more practical basis.
212 S.A.B., Lower Level He suggested, as an example
Applications for Summer Jobs with bumpers "designed for their func
Federal Government Due December 6, tion-to absorb bumps-rathe
Test in Jan.
than primarily for beauty."
EDUCATION DIVISION While predicting a continued in
The following 'schools have listed crease inrepair costs, Straub sai
teaching vacancies: "the independent garageman, fa
formngton,1Iccli: PS - Ment. Ret, from gettitng rich at the expens
Centerline, Mich.: PS - Soc. Stud./ of the motoring public as is com
Engl NOW or Sec. Sem.. monly supposed, is struggling to
Glenview, Ill.: PS - Emot. Dist. for stay alive."
Jr. High, Emot. Dist. (5-7 Yr.) The subcommittee has received
Little Falls, Minn.: PS - Sch. Diag.
or Psychologist (12 mo. position). testimony alleging overcharging
.rPanama Canal Zone: College: (Bus. for repair work in its current hear
Educ. - Accounting, Bus. Law, Bus. ings but its professional staf
Math, Office Machines - English (Com-
position and Lit.) said, in response to queries, that
Santo Domingo: Dominican Republic: it has not compiled any figure
Chem./Physics, NOW or Jan. on what is considers fair charge
For further information contact the
Plceet eries 200liS.AB. 764-7459. and actual repair bills.

(Continued from Page 6)
ary Imagery in the Devotional Poetry of
Donne, " Hrbert, Vaughn, Crashaw, and
La Ceppede," on Thursday, December
5 at 3:30 p.m. In West Alcove, Rackham,
Chair man: E. F. Gray.
Placement
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
December graduates: Please come in
and get acquainted with our Alumni
Services; if you are still hunting for
jobs or grad schools, complete or bring
up to date your registration mater-
ials. Call in your future address a n d
other pertinentuinformation, 764-7460.
LET US KNOW IF YOU HAVE A JOB.
Spring or Summer Graduates: Now
is the time to register; please get those
forms back to us; we then keep you
0 posted on recruiters visiting U of M
next semester. Call in address changes.
764-7460.
HELP US HELP YOU.
Several Currently Received Announce-
ments are available in the Career Plan-
ning Division of Placement Services,
dealing with opportunities for work-
study, government, financial aid, MAT,
MBA, PhD and other programs of grad.
study.
Program for Educational Leadership,
Teachers College, Columbia University,
N.Y.C.: leading to a Doctor of Educa-
tion, this three year program combines
bckrnds in humanities and social and
behavioral sci. the first year, intern-
ships the second, and studiee in admin-
istration and dissertation the third.
Fellowships available.
f Boy's Clubs of America offer work-
study programs for all degree levels in
social areas, 4 year programs, 1 year
MA programs and othe internships.
Scholarships avail also.
Syntex Laboratories Research Center,
Palo Alto California, offers Postdoc-
tora Fellowships in Pharmaceutical
Sciences. Stipend dep. on exper. num-
ber of dependents, travel expenses and
vacation plus med. insurance benefits.
Work for Syntex for 1-2 years on pro
-lect fundamental in nature,
GOGO,
BAHAMAS
8 FABULOUS DAYS
7 GLORIOUS NIGHTS
$17900
Selling Air Fare Only $94
Dec. 20th-27th
INCLUDES:
r Round trip jet air fare
a 7 Nights accommoda-
tions at the famous
Freeport Inn

V.

Government Announcements for Areas
of aerospace tech., social sciences, jun-
ior federal assistantships, and science
and engineering on file in Career Plan-
ning Division.
Current Position Openings received by
Gen. Div., not interviews on campus,
December grads are encouraged to ap-
ply if applicable, call 764-7460 for ap-
plication procedures.
State of Michigan: Insurance Execu-
tives, several levels, requiring degreesj
and 1-3 years exper in similar fld.
City of Detroit, Mich.: Positions in
areas of Community and social serv-
ice. Curators and allied museum work,
Engineering and Scientific areas, Fed-
eral Economic Oppor Act. Classes, ios-
pital Services, Professional and admin-
istrative, Public Service and transporta-
tion, Recreation, Security and law en-
forcement.
International Atomic Energy Agency:
positions in Vienna, Austria, terms of
duty, two years - Second officer in
Division of research and labs, nuclear
data section, min. 2 years post univ.
trng. and 4 years research exper in
nuclear reactor physics and knowl. of
FORTRAN. Subject specialist, engrg,
and instrumentation, dev. of sci. and
tech. info., degree in sci. or engrg and
6 years exper in information work.
English editor, knowl of one of the
other lang. used by the agency, and
pref. German also, degree in Engl., with
good thec. knowl. or tech. degree with
good Engl. skills.
Eggers Plywood Company, Two Riv-
ers, Wisconsin: Research Engineer, en-
grg. or wood tech. bckrnd, practical R
& D exper in gluing techniques and
plywood manuf.
County of Calhoun, Marshall, Mich.:
Juvenile Court seeks probation offi-
cers for, supervisor and counselling of
!boys referred for delinquent behavior.
BA soc., soc. wk. psych, or preferably
MSW or MA Soc., casework exper plus
BA is preferred if no MA.
Banco Credito y Ahorro Ponceno, in
Puerto Rico: Puerto Rican nationals
interested in banking business with en-
gineering, business admnin. and finace
bckrnds.
Utah State Personnel: Physician, 1
year internship and 3 years post-intern
medical employment.

7
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The student group is especially -
concerned with the problems: ---- _________
facingdthe LSA student in an ur-
ban education program.
A four-year interdiciplinary cur-
riculum was suggested to allow
- LSA students to plan their own
concentration program in prepar-
e ation for urban education.
- The proposed Urban Education
y program plans to operate out of
the Rackham Memorial Building,
i, in Detroit to allow direct ghetto
f contact for the education stu- I
- dents.
-h If you have questions
Tired of Sellng Out?
Sell in!! concerning "hold credits" issued
tat
it Student Book Service b
t
d { Best prices in Town
t on books.
- SUCCESS
on your exams Please Call 764-0558 Mon. or Tues.
from the (Dec. 9 and 70) between 9 and 12 (noon)
DASCOLA BARBERS
'r near the Michigan Theatre
'e
o
dAPeanUts love
I- for Christmas
} 4 l1 4
I 3
s 4"',.ce J °.
k v }
?"r° -
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God4r f!Ou"Pant' Galeryi Sooy ' G eatshirt ..[ ... .f.+F.?$, . $ 3 00
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die ofsSnoop lovetfor C risthias. Thoughfulnss Alum.. ..S 5 .50~Sil 3
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h oc',u of ex t in g girvi ri id eas fro m;no y u ic B x ... .. ..r'5
III oQur fa or i tePen s a}n wr\L it a b v- S opy Ham er... ..........$ 4.0
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. i F t. ? %'tt >. t r "" .n j1wp y C a e dar .... ..,$ 3.00
'}t} ay, Ft" t{ v:t-r S i

I.c. . . .~14 ~ tlG. V . 1a. . . v

PETER GRIFFITH

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Classical guitarist, composer
at
MARK'S COFFEE HOUSE
605 East William
performances at 9:00, 10:00 & 1 1 :00 P.M.
Fri., Dec. 6th and Sat., Dec. 7th

._.-
I
f
'r
1
I
I
I
t
i

Admission $1 .50

J

Reform Jewish Worship Service
R- r., Q I nI- ..kL A-I?

a:11 r1m,

vecemver o

I

ALL ARE INVITED

STOCKWELL LOUNGE
ONEG SHABBOT to follow

Thursday, Dec. 5

7:30 P.M.

Boutique for the
Fashionable Woman-
at 611 Church st.in the
arcade. daily: 11 to 5:30.
N EW'
STOCK

THE MIDDLE EAST
An outlook on the future
Speaker: DR. HAROLD WALSH
Professor of Philosophy
Michigan State University

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