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December 05, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-12-05

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Thursday, D3 cember S, 1968

Paae Three

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday; December 5, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pnri+ycT 1 r c

'fir ; '

IN SEARCH OF A MISSION

Universities

move

to

battle urban

By GARVEN HUDGINS
Associated Press Education Writer
(Part 1 of 2 Parts)
Shaken by campus violence
and public criticism, American
universities are groping for
their mission in a time of moun-
mental change.
Should they be ivory-tower re-
treats devoted exclusively to ed-
ucation? Or should they com-
mit their resources fully to the
struggle for the better life going
on in the communities around
them?
The dilemma is sharpened by
insistent demands for relevance
in higher education from stu-
dents and from activists on and
off the campus.
It has stirred clashing opin-
ions from prominent educators
trying to define the proper role
of the -university in the midst
of today's social upheavals.

Former Columbia University
Dean of Faculties Jacques Bar-
zun criticizes what he terms the
university's compulsion "to re-
semble the Red Cross more
than a university."
Barzun said at a recent news
conference that professors di-
verted from their teaching du-
ties by outside involvement are
offering what he called "idioti-
cally" specialized courses in-
stead of a liberal education.
"Since 1945, the universities
have been doing nothing but in-
novate-take on things they had
no ability or means of perform-
ing and that's why they're in
their present mess-financially
and spiritually," Barzun said.
Differing with Barzun is Clark
Kerr, former president of the
University of California at
Berkeley and now head of the

Carnegie Commission on the Fu-
ture of Higher Education.
"It is a question," said Kerr,
"of whether universities should
serve the people in the urban
ghettos or the military-indus-
trial complex, of whether they
want to serve criticism and dis-
sent or the status quo."
As the controversy builds, the
barriers which have so long di-
vided town and gown are com-
ing down as more and more
universities and colleges apply
their resources to ease the des-
perate crisis of the cities.
Few mysteries now lurk behind
the high walls and thick hedges
encircling the campus. In-
stead, there is more likely to be
recognition of aspirations too
long held back, of frustrations
too deeply ingrained and of the

enormous potential for action in
university-community coopera-
tion to overcome the problems
of urban America.
Set aside in many colleges
and universities are old antago-
nisms engendered by students
who have often flaunted privi-
leged positions to bait "town-
ies," who have staged sit-ins
and lunch counter revolts in de-
fiance of local traditions.
The tax-free status of land oc-
cupied by academic. institutions
-often a major point of conten-
tion in so many college towns-
no longer looms as a principal
issue in local elections. Other
problems press more urgently
for repair.
Town merchants, once resent-
ful of merchandizing discounts
for faculty members and of the

. I

I'm All. Right
Jack
"Devastatingly funny."
-N Y. Times
Thurs., Dec. 5
Morgan
"Wild, bizarre, free wheeling.
Howlingly funny."-N. Y. Times
Fri., Dec.6
The Endless
Summer
"Dazzling ode to sun, sand
and surf ."-Time
Sat., Dec. 7
Elvira Madigan
dPerhaps the most beautiful
movie in history.: New Yorker
"",:Sun., Dec. 8
><< Nobody
Waved Goodbye
"Amarvelous movie."
-The New Yorker
Mon., Dec. 9
Nothing
"A great movie. A revolution
in the cinema."-Life
Tues., Dec. 10
Accident
"Like a punch in the
chest. A compelling
film."-Newsweek
Wed., Dec. 11
Note dates DIAL
Listed 8-6416

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big undersell offered by the
campus store, now work togeth-
er with university urban affairs
specialists.
Key words are involvement
and commitment as more ex-
perts emerge from the campus
sanctuaries to take up the urban
challenge.
The challenge has been ac-
cepted by Columbia itself,
where Barzun now serves as
"university professor," a spe-
cial title void of administrative
function.
Rutgers, w i t h campuses in
New Brunswick, N.J., Camden
and on the edge of Newark's
tense ghetto, also is actively en-
gaged in community involve-
ment.
And so is North Carolina A &
T State University, scene of the
first lunch counter sit-ins by
Negro students in the heart of
the South 10 years ago.
Nobody claims the process is
complete or that universities
and colleges are yet merging en-
tirely with the living communi-
ties in which they are located.
The Educational Facilities La-
boratory of the Ford Founda-
tion suggests in a recent re-
port that too many institutions
still are more interested in big-
ger student cafeterias and spac-
ious campus lawns that in build-
ing new neighborhoods.
The Laboratory, created to
assist in educational problems,
urges universities to merge their
campuses with communities
around them as one important
step toward solving the urban
problem.
Columbia, for years isolated
from the slums of Harlem;
which it borders, is doing j u s t
that.
Obscured in the riotous cam-
pus upheavals of last spring was
the university's quiet initiation

crisis
of a $150-million Harlem re-
newal project.
With Ford Foundation back-
ing, Columbia also has one of
the nation's most ambitious ef-
forts at community involvement
-a $10-million plan to achieve
real action against the decay in
slums that surround it.
Columbia has undertaken the
Harlem renewal project jointly
with the Negro Labor Commit-
teen of New York and the New
York Housing and Development
Administration.
PRODUCE JOBS
The programs aim to produce
15,000 to 20,000 new jobs in Har-
lem, 3,000 new housing units
and new community recreation-
al-cultural facilities.
Radical militants, who seek a
totally black-oriented Harlem,
still appear to view Columbia as
an unwelcome intruder, out for
land grabs on Morningside
Heights, the upper Manhattan
area where the university is lo-
cated.
"Columbia," charged the Rev.
Adam Clayton Powell in a re-
cent sermon to his Harlem con-
gregation, "has purchased Len-
ox Terrace, a Harlem apartment
complex to raise rents and kick
out blacks."
Under the heading "Some-
body's Trying to Hurt Us Both,"
Columbia ran ads in Harlem's
Amsterdam News pointing out
that the university owns no pro-
perty in Harlem.
On the other side of the fence,
some Harlem residents have ap-
plauded Columbia's efforts to
get directly invoved in com-
munity problems. Some even
publicly approved the univer-
sity's plan to construct a gym-
nasium in Morningside Park.
The gym, branded by mili-
tants as an invasion of Harlem,
was a main issue in last spring's
riots, and the university ulti-
mately dropped the plait.
SCHOOL PROJECT
A major new effort is the $10-
million program to help improve
Harlem _ schools. Columbia's
Teachers College will'work di-
rectly with parents, community
groups and school personnel in
the project, which also includes
proposals for improving Harlem
housing, andsfornestablishing
Negro-owned business in Har-
lem to make more jobs.
"This is the new wave," said
a Columbia official. "It has to
be. The universities may be the
last hope for the cities."
McGeorge Bundy, president of
the Ford Foundation, said in
announcing the joint develop-
ment plan with Columbia:
"We are not talking about
something the university or a
well-intentioned men can do to
foundation or any group of
well-intentioned men can do to
somebody else. Neither are we
talking about a problem that
good will or money alone will
solve.
"We are talking about an is-
sue of concern which requires
from us all an eagerness, indeed
an insistence for cooperative ef-
fort with the city and with its
people."

the
news today
b) The Associa/ed Pr( s and CoIlcc Press Ser ice

i

BLO T

PRESIDENT-ELECT RICHARD NIXON will choose
the successor of Chief Justice Earl Warren next June.
Nixon announced that Warren had agreed to finish the
current term of the Supteme Court which ends in June of
next year. Nixon asked him to remain on the bench "in order
to avoid serious disruption of the work on the court."
The 77-year old chief justice resigned from the court last
year with the message that he would stay until a successor
was found. President Johnson's nomination, Justice Abe For-
tas, withdrew from consideration after a long Senate battle
for confirmation.
Insiders say that Warren resigned when he did because he
feared that Nixon would win the election and choose his
successor.
ITALY IS PARALYZED by a walkout of w o r k e r s
which began last night.
The 24-hour walkout was launched by Communist, so-
cialist, and Catholic led unions in a demand for higher wages.
The strike is the culmination of a week of sporadic violence
between police and thousands of demonstrating students and
workers.
Schools were closed, and postal and telephone workers,
railwaymen, taxi drivers and gasoline distributers walked off
their jobs.
Premier-designate Mariano Rumor has called a 24-hour
recess in his negotiations to rebuild the left-of-center coali-
tion which fell with Premier Giovanni Leone.
U.S. AND NORTH VIETNAMESE representatives in
Paris discussed procedure for the upcoming peace talks
yesterday.
Ambassador Cyrus Vance and Col. Ha Van Lau agreed
on general points of time, place, and order of business. De-
tails were not released.
No agreement was reached on the symbolic but politically.
significant seating arrangements at the four-way talks. In-
formed sources presume that the conference will get under
way on Monday or Tuesday of next week.
Meanwhile, Soviet SAM missiles fired on U.S. reconnais-
sance planes over North Vietnam. One plane was damaged
but returned safely to its carrier.
THE BEDFORD-STYVESANT SECTION of Brooklyn
was comparatively quiet yesterday after two days of stu-
dent demonstrations.
An explosive device was set off in a high school yester.-
day and another high school was cleared by a bomb scare.
But the hundreds of students who took to the streets earlier
in the week protesting lengthened classes in the wake of the
New York teachers strike were discouraged by'a driving rain.
The principal of an elementary school in the area said
yesterday that he was leaving his post after a threat to his
family. He was involved in a clash with residents of the pre-
dominantly black community.
ISRAELI JETS again attacked Iraqi positions deep
into Jordan yesterday.
The 90-minute attack against Iraqi army divisions was
said to be in retaliation against the bombardment of Israeli
villages in the last three days.
Israel reported one plane lost in the second day of the
attacks.
SENATOR WAYNE MORSE will ask for a recount of
votes in the Nov. 5 Oregon senatorial race.
Official totals show the Senate dove received 3,446 votes
less than his Republican opponent Robert Packwood, out of
more than 813,000 votes cast.

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