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December 03, 1968 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-12-03

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Tuesday, December 3, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Tuesday, December 3, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pane Nine

Someday ...

PREDICTIONS, EXPECTATIONS
Vietnamese politics after the war

By HUUa
'SAIGON (CPS) - A major<
change in the status of Vietnam
-a ceasefire-is a reasonable pos-j
sibility now. Such a change would
not only re-define the politicall
problems facing South VietnamI
now, but would significantly re-
align the major interest groups
in the South and affect their
respective pwer positions.

South Vietnam, but most of these7
are only small political groups
without any real organization orI
firm ideology.
It is true there are parties which!
have existed for a long time, such'
as the Kuomintang and Dai Viet
parties, but they have divided into
many branches, and these small!
branches are slowly dying becausej
they lack financial su nort I

411C-p " - uwFstt'*K6A**nhLsA.
THE NATIONALISTS The nationalist parties are snow
The nationalists seem to be trying to convince the press of
aware of the dangers in the com- their power. Their primary pur-
ing political struggles in Vietnam pose is to demonstrate their abili-
if a ceasefire should be reached. ty to maintain a government.
Alliances that have been formed The nationalist parties are now
recently are proof of their aware- trying to convince the press of
ness. their power. Their primary pur-
Many observers and politicians pose is to demonstrate their abili-
are pessimistic about this struggle, ty to maintain a government.
because until recently the nation- In order to get the support of
alist parties had not prepared a the people, the nationalist parties
strong unified platforim. Some say will play upon the suffering of
there are more than 60 parties in the people in order to attack the
U.S. Commission score
Chicago police dept.

present government, thereby try-
ing to prove to the people that the
government is corrupt and dic-
tatorial. And to get the support
of the free world, they will claim
they are strongly anti-communist.
A well-known Catholic politi-
ciap says, "The lesson over many1
centuries is always the same. We1
must know how to unify: if the!
nationalist parties fail in this
political struggle, it will becausel
they fight internally, and they will
not be able to cover up their faults
without appearing foolish."
Some observers who are more
pessimistic concerning a nation-
alist alliance see the nationalists'
struggle against the communists
like throwing an egg against a
stone wall.
In the troubled period after the
ceasefire, the fanatic parties will
not succeed in maintaining real
power. But whatever party will:
develop a realistic way to reform1
society, will have to have a plan
for a complete revolution reflect-
ing the Vietnamese culture and
character-a revolution that will
have the confidence of the people.
THE COMMUNISTSj
After the ceasefire. whatever!

The communists will use all
their cadres of former NLF sol-
diers to realize a well-defined so-
cial program, including, to name
only two aspects, land reform and
massive public education.
This policy, which had been the
basic philosophy behind all VC
activity for many years, has been
so completely successful that it
would be impossible now for the
Americans loyal to them, no mat-
ter where or how far they
searched.
THE RELIGIOUS GROUPS
Throughout Vietnam's history
religions have played an impor-
tant position in her political life.
The revolution of Nov. 1, 1963, for
example was strengthened by
Buddhist participation. Currently
the Catholic "Greater Unification
Force" and the An Quang Bud-
dhist group are preparing to plea
for peace abroad.
After the ceasefire it is certainj
that religious groups will continue
their struggle for popular inte-
rests. But what, exactly, will they
seek?
The two million Catholics in
South Vietnam are a potential
nucleus of anti-communist activ-
ity. The unpleasant experiences
with communism that led 800,000
Catholics to leave the north in
1954 created genuine fear of com-
munism among the Catholics.
These more fanatical Catholics
will probably maintain a hard line
against communism. They may
form strongholds or hold militantl
demonstrations to protest accept-
ance of the NLF as citizens in the'
south.
The other more liberal Cath-
olics, tho majority, will be more
temperate. They will stand close
to the government and the Allied
Forces.
And a small group of radicals,
such as the Song Dao group, will
choose socialism. This last group
will be supported by the intellec-
tuals.

The most important of Viet- fierce than the military combat
nam's religious groups is the Bud- now raging. Terrorism, deaths, use
dhists. Buddhism is not a religion of people as the medium for a war
of strict ideology, but South Viet- of ideologies, will continue. Polit-
nam's 10 million followers are ical groups will take regrettably
bound together by its strong cul- rigid stands.
tural influence.

trinfu1i1111. E
Because of its ability to har-
monize opposing views, Buddhism
has not had reason to lead a cam-
paign against the communists, and
vice-versa. The communists do
not consider them opponents.
From Diem's regime through
the Lotus-in-a-Sea-of-Fire-period
in 1963, Prime Minister Huong's
first term of office (1965) and
through the recent Buddhist char-
ter problem, the Buddhists' stand
is to the left of the government,
and they act as a hyphen between
the radicals and the conservatives.
After the ceasefire, there will be
a political war, amid dire econ-
omic and social problems, no less

Possibly, however, the inertia of
the Vietnamese people will act as
a brake to slow down the rumbling
machinations of a frantic polit-
ical world. For more than ten
years South Vietnam's nationalist
elements have been polarized, di-
vided and duped. Perhaps in the
coming political struggle they will
unite under a strong ideology.
The hope for the future of
South Vietnam lies in the char-
acter of the Vietnamese people.
Their patience with the nationalist
regime in the trying days ahead
will be critical. It can only be
hoped that the communist and
capitalist leadership will not sacri-
fice between them the Vietnamese
people in their struggle for power.

.I

"Joyous.-LoNewsweek.
"*****"New York.
"A gem."-Washington.
"A smash."-Chicago.
"Funny."-Philadelphia.
"Outstanding."-Boston.
"Impeccable."-Pittsburgh.
"One of the best."
-Christian Science Monitor.
"Go see."-National Observer.
"I love it."-NBC.

MoN. thru
FRI.
7:00N&R9:00
WINNER
ITE R NAT ION AL
AWARDS

V40 e
U6

f

(continued from Page 1 dcannot be condoned. "If no action political solution is reached, fo
"We. continued to walk toward is taken against them," aWlker mer communists who return fron
the command post. A derelict who warns, "the effect can only be to the NLF will have a part in i
appeared to be very intoxicated, discourage the majority of po- President Thieu refuses to ac
walked up to the policeman, mum- licemen who acted responsibly, knotvledge the NLF, and cal
bled something that was incoher- and further weaken the b o n d them "rebels.''" a a
ent. The policeman pulled some- between police and community." However, to absorb this grou
thing from his belt, a tiny con- The report further concluded into society, perhaps the govern
tainer, and sprayed its contents that many of the charges leveled ment will change the name of tl
into the eyes of the derelict who by newsmen that the police had Open Arms Ministry to somethin
stumbled around and fell on his specifically interfered with their like the Popular Unification Mi
Wfacer dsoperations were valid. istry, in order to allow NLF memr
'Walker concludes in his report "Newsmen and photographers bers to return as citizens.
tha whle assofconrolby hewere singled out for assault and To do this would save face, a,
policeman is understandable, it their equipment deliberately dam- well as be an attemptstomaintair
aged," he report states, control over the returnees.
Law students 1One newsman, cited in the re- If this ministry does legaliz(
port, was told by a detective citizenship of NLF members, the
e suitacquaintance that "The word is new citizens will begin imme
Sbeingpassed to get newsmen." In- diately to move into the politica
(Continued from Page 1) dividual newsmen were warned by system. The communists will en
arguments for the suit. police "You take my picture to- deavor to profit as much as pos
Curtner said that "we have clear night and I'm going to get you." sible within the limits of the lav
statutory right to press the case However, the report adds, that to carry out their true purpose
and we have exhausted all admin- some of the media-directed vio- to control the government.
istrative remedies." He noted aTlence d b epaie oed The ccmmunists will first wor
student formely classified II-S, tedmntaos"na es toward d °stroying nationalist pai"
was reclassified I-A after partici- to o ai id sfothes ep ty power, and then toward de
pating in a sit-in at a draft-board. up ther a es f stroying the government structur
B~u th curtwold av taenof TV cameramen.
But the court would have taken Newsmen and photographers' as it now stands. They will us
the case had it involved statutory blinding lights did get in the way two familiar tools: the people an
rights, which ours does," Curtner . of police clearing streets, sweep- international opinion.
said. He argues this precedent is ing the park and dispersing dem- The communists will profit fror
an argument for. trying the case. onstrators. And newsmen did, on any freedom allowed the press
The prospective arguments of occasion, disobey legitimate police and from their own propagand
the defense and the plaintiff and orders to "move" or "clear the "speak straightly, speak th
the type of evidence used will also streets" truth," to attack the corruptio

t.
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i-
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Seniors and
Graduate Students
Career hunt with 90 of the finest companies
having operations located in the New Jersey/New
York metropolitan area. On December 26-27 at the
Marriott Motor Hotel, intersection of Garden State
Parkway and Route 80, Saddle Brook, New Jersey.
For more details, including a listing of spon-
soring companies, see your college placement
director or write to the non-profit sponsor of the
second annual "Career-In": Industrial Relations
Association of Bergen County, P. 0. Box 533,
Saddle Brook, New Jersey 07662.

fxl W- t t

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mHIamhIRANr

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be Drought up at the hearing. In the end, the report notes,
Two Yale professors h a v e "This is not the last time that a
brought suit in a Connecticut violent dissenting group will clash
court also challenging the-refusal' head-on with those whose duty it
of a, state selective service board is to enforce the law and the nextE
to grant a student a I-S defer- time the whole world will still be
ment. watching.
3 ,
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of the various governments pre
ceding the ceasefire-the truth o
which no one can deny.
Their second objective is to at
tack the nationalist parties' plat
form and play upon the division
between politicians.

--
e213 S. STATE ST.
is,
a
.n
if
-- FOR MER LY CAMPUS DISCOUNT
s
N O GA ME S
NO GIMMICKS
Princess Dial AQUAMARINE COLGATE COLGATE PHISOHEX
L FAwCE SOAPt1 / --6L R B/ u p 96 hK NE9
LFE OAP LOTION TOOTH BRUSH SKIN CLEANSER
Req . 5c Each U L T R A B R IT E ' 9,e .K n e .$9
25c R$2. fl C inge8 1 C $304 $9
Value Sz jlPint
for 12oz.ELReDT ELQU98c D8rPWDRSite UT3 L
Limit 3 w/Coupon. Exp. 12-9-68 Limit 1 w/Coupon. Exp. 12-9-68 Limit 1 w/Coupon. Exp. 12-9-68 Limit 3 w/Coupon. Exp.,12-9-68 With Coupon-Exp. 12-9-68
LIFE LOTION VOS SHAMPOO WOOLITE RAPID SHAVE FACIAL TISSUE
HAIR CONDITIONER LIQUID or POWDER 200 COUNT-2 PLY
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$1.98 $1.89 Reqgie"e
29 8Siz99e6
12izeT315 oz,$150 7 2 oz, 35'cValue
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Limit 1 w/Coupon. Exp. 12-9-68 Limit 1 w/Coupon. Exp. 12-9-68 Limit 1 w/Coupon. Exp. 12-9-68 Limit 1 w/Coupon. Exp. 12-9-68 With Coupon-Exp. 12-9-68
TRYLON GLYCERIN LUSTRE CREMESREXPDPAT OE OLD SPICE
NORWRCERA DS ABNETY OSEE
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Re.Pint0 42 Count t Value 4 z. 6
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DEODORANT Rq
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Reg CC $ 36Box of 99C
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of 100 $1.0 Reg . 79c $2.25 10 Extra
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Limit 1 w/Coupon. Exp. 12-9-68 Limit 2 w/Coupon. Exp. 12-9-68 Limit 1 w/Coupon. Exp 12-9-68 Limit 1 w/Coupon. Exp. 12-9-68 Limit 1 w/Coupon. Exp. 112-9-68
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