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November 27, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-27

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Wednesday, November 27, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Saigon Page Three

FOX EASTERN TEHLATRES
FOR MILN~E
375No.MAPLE RD.-7691300
NOW SHOWING'
Mon.-Tues.-Wed. 7:20-9:30
Sat. 3:00-5:15-7:20-9:30
Thurs.-Fri.-Sun. 1:00-3:00-5:15
7:20-9:30

i.

.....

DIAL 8-6416
k h e f e ll e a
bed
IN HERHaR
Panav cio br b etxe
Thursday: "Mr. Hulot's Holiday"

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3528 L.S.&A. Bldg. before 2
p.m. of the day preceding publi-
cation and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. General No-
tices may be published a maximum
of two times on request; Day Cal.
endar items appear only once. Stu-
dent organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27
Day Calendar
Chemistry Colliuium: Terry Cran-
dall, Dept. of Chemistry. "A Biogenetic
Type Synthesis of Cedrene," Room 1300
Chemistry,-4:00 p.m.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28
HAPPY THANKSGIVING
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER29
NO EVENTS SCHEDULED
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30
NO EVENTS SCHEDULED
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar: "Management of Managers, Pro-
gram No. 75": North Campus;Commons,
8:15 am.
General Notices
Center for Russian and East Euro-
pean Studies and Dept. of Journalism
Lecture: John Scott, Special Correspon-
dent, Time Magazine, "The Soviet
Economy -- and the Soviet Empire,"
Rackham Amphitheater, Monday, De-
cember 2, 4:10 p.m.
Medical School Glee Club Concert:
"On Call '69": Trueblood Auditorium,
Frieze Bldg., Monday, December 2, 8:00
p.m.
Womens Research Club, Mrs. Lola-
gene C. Coombs, Research Assoc., Po*-
pulation Studies Center, "Pre-marital
Pregnancy, Family Background,rand
Economic Status," West Conference
Room, 4th Floor, Rackham Bldg., Mon-
day, Dec. 2, 8:00 p.m.
Broadcasting Service: WUOM Radio
(91.7 Mc.) 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily;
Wednesday 11:00 a.m. The Eleventh
Hour (repeated at 7 p.m.) Ed Burrows

I H I

Try Doily Classifieds
Christmas G1iideas
IMPORTED JEWELRY
RAW SILK ROBES
SILK SARIS
HANDWOVEN PONCHOES
India Art Shop
330Maynard Street

hosts an hour of news and conversation
about the arts and literature. Guests:
Gourmet Panel with Thomas Warbur-
tion and Peg Kay.
Wednesday, 1:00 p.m. U-M Conference
on Aging Lecture: The Hon. William D.
Bechill, Commissioner on Aging, HEW,
Washington, on "Community Patterns
for the Care of the Aged". Wednesday
8:00 p.m. Opera Night: Puccini: "Ma-
dame Butterfly"; Prokofiev: "War and
Peace" (highlights).
Thursday 1:00 to 5:45 p.m. Music
for Thanksgiving: 8:05 p.mto 10:00
p.m, Music for Thanksgiving.
Student Accounts: Your attention is
called to the following rules passed by
the Regents on February 28, 1936:
"Students shall pay/all accounts due
the University not later than the last
day of classes of each semester or sum-
mer session, Student loans which are
not paid or renewed are subject to this
regulation; however, student loans not
yet due are exempt. Any unpaid ac-
counts at the clo e of business on the
last day of classs will be reported to
the Cashier of the University and
"(a) All academic credits will be
withheld, the grades for the semester
or summer session just completed will
not be released, and no transcript of
credits will be issued.
"(b) All students owing such ac-
counts will not be allowed to register
in any subsequent semester or summer
session until payment has been made."
AcademicrCostume: Can be rented
at Moe Sport Shop, 711 North Univer.
sity Avenue. Orders for Winter Com-
mencement Exercises should be placed
immediately, and MUST be placed be-
fore November 29.
The Queen's University, Belfast, Ire-
land, again offers an exchange scholar-
ship for a University of Michigan grad-
uate. The scholarship will provide fees,
board and lodging for the Academic
year 1969-70. A married student re-
ceives 250 pounds in lieu of board
and lodging. A grant of $400 will be
made by the Graduate School to par-
tially defray the cost of travel. Study
may be carried on in any of the
academic disciplines offered at the
Queen's University. Further informa-
tion and application forms are available
at the Graduate Fellowship Office,
Room 1014, Rackham Building+ Deadline
for receipt of applications is January
15, 1969.
Regents' Meeting: December 20, 1968.
Communications for consideration at
this meeting must be in the President's
hands no later than December 5.
The University of Michigan
Intramural Sports Department
SPORTS BUILDING
HOLIDAY SCHEDULE
Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years
1968-1969
Close Wed., Nov. 27, at 6:03 p.m.
Closed Thurs., Nov. 28th thru Sun.,
Dec. 1.-
Regular hours Dec. 2 thru Dec. 13th.
Open:
Sat., Dec. 14 - 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Mon., Dec. 16 -10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Tues., Dec. 17 - 10:00 a.m to 4:00 p.m.
Wed., Dec. 18 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Thurs., Dec. 19 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00
p.m.
Fri., Dec. 20- 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Closed Sat. & Sun., Dec. 21 and 22nd.
Open:
Mon., Dec. 23 -10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Tues., Dec. 24 -10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Closed Wed., Dec. 25th.
Open:
Thurs., Dec. 26 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Fri., Dec. 27 - 10:00 a.m. to 400 p.m.
Closed Sat. & Sun., Dec. 28 and 29th.
Open:
Mon., Dec. 30 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Tues., Dec. 31 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Closed Wed., January 1st.
Open:
Thurs., Jan. 2 - 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Fri Jan. 3 -10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Regular hours begin Mon., Jan. 6th.
R. J. Grambeau, Intramural Director
Placement
GENERAL DIVISION
3200.S.A.B.
ANNOUNCEMENT:
NSA holding oral interviews for those
i--
DIAL 5-6290
Daily at 1:00-3:45-6:30-9:10
Now for the
first time
at popular prices.
Direct from
its reserved-seat
engagement.

having passes the test in October, or
Math & Engineering majors who are
exempt from the written test. Call this
week for the appointments on Dec. 5
and 6.
USIA holding group information
meetings for juniors and seniors, and
graduate students, in any area, in-
terested In the work of the USIA, Meet-
ings at 10 A.M. and 3 P.M. on Tues-
day, Dec. 3 and at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m.
on Wednesday, Dec. 4, Room 3516. Sign
up by calling 764-7460 this week, or
Monday.
SeveralCurrently receivedannoun e-
ments are available in the Career Plan-
ning Division of Placement Services
dealing with opportunities for financ-
ial aid, work-study, MAT. MBA. PhD
and other programs of further study.
B'Nal B'rth Youth Organization of-
fers awards through Richad Klutznick
Scholarship Fund for students in Social
work. Avail, to seniors who will be en-
tering social work schools, and to
those already involved in the 2 year
program. The stipend carries obligation
to work. for 2-3 years with BBYO after
graduation.
Community Career Opportunity Con-
ferences, or Operations Native Sons,
held during Xmas Holidays (most Dec.
26-28, some 30-31). Both residents and
other students welcome to meet with
employers of the area, browse, or hold
interviews. Poster listing over 200 such
meetings and individual posters from
areas on file in the career Planning
Library area of Placement Services. A
few request postcards for advance re-
gistration. We will list areas as we re-
ceive individual notices, watch this
column, and come in to check the na-
tionwide listings on the poster.
Youngstown, Ohio. December 26 and
27, Hotel Ohio. Registration cards avail.
Dayton Area, Ohio. December 26 and
27, Statler Hiton Inn. Preregister form
requested.
Beaver County, Pennsylvania. Decem-
ber 27, Penn Beaver Hotel, Rochester,
Pa.
Madison, Wisconsin, Friday, December
27, Wisconsin Center, Univ. of Wisc.
Campus.
Woodward and Lothrop Incorporated,
of Washington will hold a seminar on
Careers in Merchandising for Wash.
D.C. area students, on Friday, Dec. 27,
in their store.
Current Position Openings received
by General Division by mail and phone,
not interviews on campus. Since these
are to be filled relatively immediately,
they are of interest to December grad-
uates. Call 764-7460 for further in-
formation, or come to 3200 S.A.B.
United Nations, N.Y.C.: Spanish
Translators Examination will be given
in N.Y. on Jan. 16 and 17. Applications
forms avail at Examinations and Train-
ing Section, (Spanish Translators) Of-
fice of Personnel, Room 644, United Na-
tions, N.Y., N.Y. 10017.
Local Area Newspapers, 1 full time,
and 1 20-30 hr. wk. position with
small area weeklies: Editorial work for
all general loc'al news, both desk and
field work. Exper. and/or education re-
lated to journalistic areas.
Wolverine Plastics. Milan, Mich.: Ma-
terials handling workers, for shifts com-
patible with ,taking classes, 3-11 p.m.
and 11 p.m.-7 a.m bonus for these
shifts. No metal handling.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
SERVICE
212 S.A.B., Lower Level
Applications for summer jobs in fed-
eral agencies are now available at S.P.S.
Please read the following schedule of
application dates carefully:
Applications received by Noember
6 will be scheduled for December 7,
examination.
Aunlications received by December 6
will be scheduled for January 11 exam-
ination.
Applications received by January 3
will be scheduled for February 8 exam-
ination.
Applications received by January 30
will be scheduled for March 8 examin-
ation.
Next' application date for summer
jobs in federal government agencies is'
Dec. 6. ,
Department Of The Interior. An-
chorage, Alaska. Fire Control, Smoke
Jumper, and surveying aid applic. ac-
cepted from now through Jan. 1.
General Electric Co, Chicago Heights,
Il.: Assembly line work for men from
Dec. 6 to Jan. 9. Good pay. Must live
in south-suburb Chicago.

S
to attend
peace talks
Continued from page 1)
and the convening of the new
Paris meeting.
The South Vietnam statement
said that its sovereignty has been
respected in the two-side formula
which it had proposed on Nov. 8.
At that time President Nguyen
Van Thieu proposed that S u t h
Vietnam should take over the
leadership of the allied delegation
in Paris. The U.S. assurances that
Saigon would be the main spokes-
man on all mattrs of principal
concern to Vietnam apparently
met Thieu's request.
The U.S. statement said it made
clear that in the discussions be-
tween the United States and North
Vietnamese negotiators "we will
regard and treat all persons on
the other side of the table -
whatever they might claim for
themselves - as members of a
single side, that of Hanoi, and for
practical purposes as a single
delegation."
This is expected to bring an
outburst from Hanoi, where it has
been claimed that North Vietnam
and the National Liberation Front
form separate and distinct dele-
gations.
Meanwhile, allied penetrations
of the sometime forbidden demili-
tarized zone apparently had ended
by the time the Washington and
Saigon governments announced
Saigon's agreement to join the
Paris peace talks.
The word in Saigon from For-
eign Minister Tran Cahn Thanh
came after U.S. Marines battled
enemy forces for several hours
yesterday in the DMZ. It was their
first time there since the Nov. 1
bombing halt that led to a period
of uncertainty on whether Saigon
would engage in the Paris talks.
The U.S. Command said the
Marines had pulled out of the.
once neutral buffer strip by night-
fall.
Great boycott
tables grapes
(Continued from page 1)
state of California, growers are
hiring workers across the Mexican
border to break the strike.
Gov. Ronald Reagan of Cali-
fornia opposes the boycott. Re-
cently, when tomato pickers went
on strike, Reagan ordered state
prison inmates into the fields to
break the strike.
Mills, however, sees some indi-
cation that the movement is hurt-
ing the growers. "Based on calu-
lations which involve counting
boxcars, stores selling grapes, and
lugs of grapes in storage, sales
have fallen off 20 to 30 per cent
nationally," he said.
He added that eight million
lugs are presently in storage, which
is one million more than the av-
erage stored over the last five
years.

the
news today11
by T he Associa/ed Press and CoIlege Press Service
FRENCH SPENDING CUTBACKS following the re-
cent monetary crisis will include the elimination of atom-
ic bomb tests previously planned for 1969.
Premier Maurice Couve de Murville yesterday announced
tax increases and spending reductions which will cut this
year's projected debt in half.
Meanwhile, in London, Prime Minister Harold Wilson
lashed out at charges he pressured the West German gov-
ernment to increase the value of the mark, setting off a major
diplomatic row.
In New York, the stock market responded to the relax-
ation of tension in the crisis as the general price index rose
and gains outnumbered losses alniost two to one.
And Rep. Wilbur Mills (D-Ark), chairman of the House
Ways and Means Committee said yesterday the French de-
cision not to devalue the franc will have little effect on the
U.S. economy.
VICE PRESIDENT HUMPHREY said yesterday he will
not accept any permanent political assignment from the
incoming Republican administration.
The statement came in response to speculation that the
Vice President might be named U.S. ambassador to the United
Nations by President-elect Nixon.
Instead, Humphrey indicated that he may seek a seat in
the Senate.
* 0 0
THE GOVERNMENT yesterday ruled that a major
brokerage house has unlawfully disclosed inside financial
information to selected investors.
The Securities Exchange Commission ordered sanctions
on two offices of Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner and Smith af-
ter announcing its ruling.
The SEC announcement came as pre-trial hearings on
related charges began in New York City.
* . 0
CHRISTIAN DEMOCRAT LEADER Mariano Rumor
was named Italian Premier yesterday.
Rumor, who has headed the Christian Democrats for the
past four years, indicated he would be sworn in as premier
only when and if he can form a coalition cabinet.
If Rumor succeeds in forming a new cabinet, it could
mark a major turning point in Italy's turbulent student and
labor situation since the Socialist party has set the price for
its key participation in the new government as major labor,
social and educational reforms.
* . .
THE FBI yesterday announced the arrests of eight
persons identified as members of La Cosa Nostra.
Two other men, including one who officials describe as
"the overlord of crime" in western New York state and South-
ern Ontario are still being sought, officials said.
The charges involved alleged bookmaking, gambling and
loan sharking activities.
PRESIDENT-ELECT NIXON named two key White
House aides yesterday.
Robert Ellsworth, Nixon's political director during the
election campaign, flew to London last night to survey the
Institute for Strategic Studies and compare it to American
"think tanks" like the Rand Corp.
Ellsworth's new job was described as one with a "broad
and general character."
TEN NIGERIANS were killed yesterday as thousands
of demonstrators converged on a governmental center at
Lagos.
The deaths came as troops and riot police fired on the
demonstrators. The protesters were expressing opposition to
recent tax measures.
* 0 0
NEARLY 20,000 STUDENTS marched through the
Pakistani capital, Rawalpindi, Tuesday in the largest an-
tigovernment demonstration in the past 10 years.
All schools and colleges were ordered closed indefinitely
after the seven hour protest concluded. Schools had been
scheduled to be reopened yesterday after being closed for
18 days because of the violent demonstrations that have left
at least three students dead.
E E e
'THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT yesterday initiated a

new program of legal aid to welfare recipients.
Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare Wilbur Co-
hen said the government will provide 75 to 80 per cent match-
ing funds to states wishing to join the program.
The program is expected to help the poor especially in
rural areas. It will apply essentially to civil, not criminal
cases.
." . V. ® ° _ ., . .... ....., . -_ ._ v ",2 . : " . .... . . . . ":x _ .T ..._ ._. v r r . 1..r 2 _ . . . . _

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Thanksgiving May Be Your Last Chance!
WHILE YOU ARE HOME CHECK WITH YOUR FOLKS
TELL THEM:
1) These are the ONLY flights backed by The University
2) ONLY flights flying with Scheduled, Reliable I.A.T.A. Airlines (Sabena and Pan Am)
3) .$24 ;c ni, n n TL.mfris,;Ia Iifh FE F1h n ia t Uiwhaf la p1nd nnA f ill (lnc /i m b n ,S

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