100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 26, 1968 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, November 26, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine'

Varsity mauls frosh in loosely played opener

i
a , f
it ' r : @ f r
fit.

By BILL CUSUMANO
Michigan revealed its new look
in basketball last night in the
annual Varsity-Freshmen game,
and the sparse crowd came away
less than impressed. In a game
minated by mistakes and sloppy
P y, the varsity ran Ito a 105-78
victory that showed a need for the
remaining week of practice before
the season's opener.
Coach Johnny Orr admitted that
his team requires more work, par-
ticularly in the area of the full-
curt press. "We were not as well
conditioned as I thought we'd be,"
commented Orr, "but the press
did work well at the end of the
first half and the start of the sec-
ond."
And the press was the factor
that did detonate the varsity bomb
teat blew the game open.
After a sliggish opening fifteen
minutes in which the outside
shooting of Dennis Stewart and
Rudy Tomjanovich had given the
letternien a 10 point lead, the var-
sity's pressure finally took its toll
upon the inexperienced frosh.
IA steal by Rodney Ford, another
basket by Ford on a pass from Bob
Sullivan and a Dan Fife bucket
following a steal by Sullivan came
in rapid succession to open up a
16 point margin with three min-
utes remaining in the half.
The frosh did manage to cut the
.ficit to 10 once again at the
half but the effects of the tough

man to man pressure were ob-
viously too much for them. An-
other three basket outburst at the
start of the second half, all com-
ing on fast breaks, buried any
hopes of a comeback that the new-
comers might have had.
The remainder of the game was
just a matter of the varsity exert-
ing their superiority and building
up their lead to its final 27 point
margin. Many of the points came
in a final racehorse 10 minutes
which saw the court populated
with reserves. The magic 100 mark
was finally reached with 1:20 left
on a jumper by Tom Lundstedt.
Despite the generally sloppy con-
duct of the game, the varsity did
manage to show flashes of its of-
fense before the substitutes ar-
rived.
Tomjanovich banged in 26
points to top all scorers, showing
that he still has his fine outside
touch and also demonstrating
* p
daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL DINNER

some strong inside moves off the The Wisconsin senior was a major
low post. instrument in keying the second
The star forward's celebrated half outburst that decided the

back injury was in evidence,
though, as he only pulled in seven
caroms off the boards and had
few of the follow shots that he is
known for.
Rudy also worked well off the
high post, setting several picks for
Sullivan backdoor plays. Sullivan
got part of his 10 points on these
plays but contributed even more
to the attack with his sharp pass-
es and leading of the fast break.

game.
The senior Wolverines did hold
a lead before their explosion, and
much of it was forged by Dennis
Stewart. The 6-6 forward pumped
in 18 markers in the first stanza,
most of them on long jumpers
from the side and the top of the
key.
He finished the contest with on-
ly 20 points, though, as he fouled

out with almost 12 minutes of'
playing time remaining.
In addition to his scoring Stew-
art also helped with his hustle
on the press. However, his re-
bounding left something to be
desired as he only retrieved three
bounds.
In fact, it was a deficiency on

Particularly adept at cashing
in on the second shot was 6-7
John Linnen.
The greatest asset that the
fosh possessed was its backcourt
pair of Lamont King and Dave
Hart. The two speedy guards hit
for 19 and 14 points respectively,
showing a strong ability to drive

the boards that helped the frosh , the foul lane. The pair weren't
to stay in the contest. Orr ad- enough to stave off the varsity,
mitted that, "we didn't check as though, as the fast pace of the
well as we could have" and the I game finally took affect.
r£uuI vla.t a h f Af hh f Teasyiwnh t

besue was a ouncs of
buckets gained on secon

STIDWELL, COOKE EXCEL:

women's SwIM club cops th

apoplexy
0 doug helle
In retrospect
In retrospect, it seems a little grotesque that the Wolverines and
their fans were actually hoping to go to the Rlose Bowl before
Saturday.
*t As it turned out, Michigan had about as much chance to beat
Ohio State as it would have had against the Los Angeles Rams.
Apparently, when you are about to take on the Buckeyes, you
tter have at least as much material as they do because you will
ver beat them on desire alone. That's because nobody but nobody
gets up higher for a game than OSU..
And how could they avoid it? There's a fight song at Ohio
State which says, "We don't give a damn about the whole State
of Michigan, we're from O-hi-o." This sounds like evidence of a
fantastic inferiority complex. And really it is, in everything except
football.
So if they don't give a damn about Michigan, the one thing
they do give a damn about is football, FOOTBALL, FOOTBALL.
Columbus, Ohio, has the most enthusiastic football fans in the
Midwest, in the country, in the world. Incidentally, that includes
South Bend, Indiana, home of Ara and Co.
And Columbus is much more than a football town. It is a
football CITY. The 590,000 rabid football nuts who populate it
makes it .the second biggest city in the state next to Cleveland,
bigger than Cincinnati. In a football stadium that is somewhat
smaller than Michigan's, the Buckeyes quite often outdraw the
Wolverines.
In spirit, of course, there is no comparison.
Last .Saturday, for instance, football;was on everybody's mind
all the time and the 85,000 who were lucky enough to get, tickets for
the game were just a small part of it. But they made up for the
'eople who were not there by making enough noise for 590,000.
At the end of the game the mass of screaming people who over-
ran the field in order to tear down the goal posts were not hindered
in any way by the police. Apparently, the cops were looking after
their own safety.
But all this was minor compared to the riot-celebration that
descended on High Street (OSU's version of State Street plus a
uple of dozen bars).
Clearly, nothing like this would ever happen in Ann Arbor.
It got to the point where you thought you would probably have
felt sorry for Columbus if OSU had lost. Should that have hap-
pened the whole city would probably have melted away into one
big crying puddle.
With all this going on around them, it's no wonder that the
:am, like the fans, are a bunch of animals. And the biggest monsters
e not ,quarterback Rex Kern and fullback Jim Otis, but people
like offensive tackles Rufus Mayes and Dave Foley, and on defense
John Tatum, appropriately playing the monster-man position.
And leading the animals is the biggest of them all, Coach Woody
Hayes. Hayes does not let a little thing like modesty get in his
way. The team is always "my boys" as he says "my boys are a quality
team". Hayes must have more enemies than anybody since Attila
$ie Hun.
' The only thing good you can say about him is that he won.

By DIANA ROMANCHUK
The Michigan Women's Swim
ming and Diving Club came bac
from East Lansing this weeken
still only third best in the coun
try.
Arizona State powered its wa
to the National - Intercollegiat
Championship, rolling up 11
points to second-placed We.
Chester State's 72 and Michigan
68.
The defending national champ
they tallied in each of the 1
events, with three finishers in th
50-yard butterfly, and two in bot
the 100-yard fly and the 100-yar
breaststroke.
Michigan, though, had the5
and 100-yard breaststroke cham
pion in Johanna Cooke. She h
her best times of the seasoni
both events, a :33.88 and a 1:14.0
respectively.
She also joined Kathy Stidwe
Jan Darrah, and Barbara Patte
son in the 200-yard medley rela
which finished third behind We
Chester State and Indiana.
Miss Stidwell was Michigan
other individual champion, cap
turing the 200-yard individuE
medley in 2:20.07. Later she place
second in the 400-yard freestyle

n-
ck
rd
1-
ay
ate
12
st
's
16
he
th
rd

Teammate Margy Scrivo finish-
ed fifth in the same event, and
third in the shorter 200-yard free.
The 200-yard freestyle relay of
Miss Patterson, Jan Pfleegor,
Lynn Allison, and Mary Bennett
finished second in 1:46.43.
Besides her contribution in the

two relays, Barb Patter
a third in the 100-yard
while teammate TonjaI
ished sixth. Earlier T
placed fifth in the 50-fl
Team captain Lynn A
fifth in the 50-yard free
lowed by teammate Jan

M' comeback fails in w,
polo squeaker against(

By ROD ROBERT

The Wolverines got the
again with 15 seconds left

ball
but

I

iresnmen Th'e varsity did win the match
Ad shots. on their running game and they
~ ~ - really had to. Without Ken Maxey,
who is in the hospital with a knee
injury, the offense was not fluid,
d only functioning at odd moments.
However, the many moves did
iti demonstrate the possible effect-
iveness of the open court offense.
Orr does know that sloppy play
son added cannot be tolerated and this fact
butterfly was well demonstrated last night.
Lahti fin- Also, it was shown that the loss
'onja had of Maxey would be great and that
y. Dennis Stewart can't afford to go
llison was out on fouls.
style, fol- The Wolverine varsity got its
Pfleegor. first win last night, even if it was
!unofficial, but also learned that
the next week will have to be used
aIer to iron out the many mistakes
a j that were made or the actual
opener may not be as pleasant.
NIIL Standings

NBA Standings

Michigan's water polo team lost
50 its final game of the season to
n- Ohio State 15-14 over the week-
it end, as their desperate last-min-
in ute rally was cut short by the
09 buzzer.
The Wolverines finished their
Ll, first-season campaign with a 6-4
- mark.
ay Early in the first quarter, soph-
st omore Mike Allen scored two quick
goals, and it might have been a
s Michigan runaway.
P- But only nine 'M' players made
al the trip, while OSU had more
d than twice as many men.
I The Ohio State coach rotated!
two full squads of players to keep
his team well-rested, whereas
Michigan had only two men to
substitute.
s One of the Wolverines whoI
couldn't make it to Columbus was
defensive ace Mike O'Connor, and
his absence was felt all too soon.
s Though the valiant efforts of
14 Bob Zann and John Robertson
% stopped OSU from scoring at least!
half a dozen times, it wasn't
enough; and Michigan held on to
a 7-7 halftime tie.
Michigan tried its comeback.
7f2 Greg Zann's 20-foot bullet with
1:50 left brought the Wolverines
a goal closer. Then Gary Kinkaid
broke into the clear to score twice
in the next 70 seconds, and it was
suddenly 15-14.

John Robertson's buzzer shot was Montreal
blocked, and Michigan was shy New York
Boston
by one.
Torontao
Mike Allen was high scorer Detro
again and ended up with six goals,
while Greg Zann added three toI
the 'M' cause. St. Louis
Los Angeles
Exhausted after the game, Allen Minnesota
Philadelphia
lamented, "If we had only played Oakland
the whole game like the first and Pittsburgh
last two minutes, we would have
killed them." No games

East Division
W L T
12 4 3
13 6 0
12 5 2
9 63
10 8 1
West Division
9 64
7 10
6 11 2
6 112
S 13 3
3 12 3

4
2
2
2
3
3

22
16
14
14
13
9

59
41
45
37
42
43

38
59
60
57
70
65

esterday's Games
cheduled

In those four minutes, Michigan
outscored 0SU 5-0.

Today's Games
No games scheduled.

rrrr "
ri
r
f }r I
rr .r
"t
! K
6 ! ,t S
l
' .

Eastern Division
W L
Baltimore 15 5
Boston 13 5
Cincinnati 12 6
Philadelphia 10 5
Detroit 8 10
New York 8 13
Milwaukee 5 12

LOOK AT THIS!!
The SHORTWAY BUS LINE
Now Serves

T Pts. GF GA
3 27 63 43
0 26 58 45
2 26 67 42
3 21 46 45
1 21 74 59
3 17 61 53

-Daily-Andy Sacks
RUDY TOMJANOVICII, the Wolverines' 6'7" forward, springs up
lays the ball in the bucket at the annual Freshman-Varsity pre-
season clash. Although hampered by a back injury, Tomjanovich
will be the big gun for Michigan's offense and defense this season.

Students visiting Chicago's YMCA Hotel
week-ends or during school vacations are
Very Important Guests to us.
We think we're "keyed" to serving fellows
and gals like yourselves. In fact, if we
didn't feel this way, we wouldn't be in
business. We've convinced our entire staff
of over 300 people that we're here to ,
serve you the best we know how.

Pct.
.750
.722
.667
.667
.444
.381
.294
.737
.526
.476
.474
.313
.333
.292

Western
Los Angeles
San Francisco
Atlanta
San Diego
Phoenix
Chicago
Seattle

Division
14 5
10 9
10 11
9 10
5 11
7 14
7 17

$1.85 Detroit Metro Airport
$2.60 Toledo

72 times weekly
42 times weekly
35 times weekly
29 times weekly

We have a wide selection of rooms-from basic sleeping'to
full facility rooms-enough to accommodate up to 2,000 men,
women and families. Because we have all hotel facilities in-
cluding budgeted meals in our Cafeteria and Coffee Shop,
dances, entertainment-a roof garden in summer-we call
ourselves a hotel and then some!
Try us the next time you come to Chicago. A card or phone
call will insure your reservation.
Single: $4. $10. Double: $8.-$13.50 (for two).
Discounts to groups of 11 or more.

$2.10
$2.65

Lansing
Flint

connections made for all points
above service departs from

Yesterday's Games
Milwaukee vs. Seattle at Vancouver,
inc.
Only game scheduled.

MICHIGAN UNION
530 S. State

GREYHOUND TERMINAL
1 16 W. Huron

* RECORDS
. BOOKS
SGAMES
e TOYS
s STATIONERY
and
* "MICHIGAN" SOUVENIRS
make
OL.LTT'S
STATE STREET AT NORTH UNIVERSITY " ANN ARBOR
yourk
Christmas Shopping Headquarters
08.

OR

662-4431

662-5511

I,

-

Here's

Your

Last Call

I

i

For .Season

Cage

Tickets

FOLLETT'S FOIBLES

By E. Winslow

I
A coed, more belligerent than bright
Set a record with her power-house right.

V-
From Follett's finally bought
a disc
To curb that romance risk,

5%
And broke both records the
following night.

The most exciting basketball season at Michigan
since Cazzie Russell was thrilling crowds is on the
horizon-and the opening is next week, Monday,
Dec. 2. Here's whats on tap.
" A new, coach whose teams are explosive on of-
fense and aggressive on defense.
" Rugged schedule of Big Ten teams in addition to'
a giant doubleheader.
* Four talented regulars returning from last year's
Wolverine team.
" Cushioned, theater-style seats to watch all the
action.
Michigan students and staff can reserve a seat
for a winter of top-flight college basketball, 12
games in all, for one of the best bargains in ath-
letics.
Student season tickets for $6.
Staff season tickets for $11.
General public season tickets for $22.
Johnny Orr' takes over as head coach, this season
with such outstanding players as Rudy Tomjanovich,
Second Team All-Big Ten as a sophomore, Dennis
Stewart, Capt. Ken Maxey and Bob Sullivan.
The big doubleheader will bring in Michigan State
to play highly-regarded Toledo with the Wolverines
meeting Western Michigan in the-second game.
Davidson has one of its outstanding teams due
for an Events Building appearance Dec. 7 then comes
Iowa, Indiana, MSU, Illinois, Minnesota and Wis-
consin.
This is your last chance to take advantage of the
student and faculty rates for Michigan basketball.
You can buy your tickets now at the athletic ticket
office, 1000 S. State St.
Parking Availl
111 VR1 Rwhal

MICHIGAN'S HOPES in this season's Big Ten basketball race
rest largely with these four veterans. Anchoring the Wolverines
are, left to right, Rudy Tomjanovich, Capt. Ken Maxey, Bob
Sullivan and Dennis Stewart.
MICHIGAN'S BASKETBALL SCHEDULE

Ii

Find self expression in our stock of low-

Home Schedule
Dec. 2-NORTHERN ILLINOIS
(Monday)
'Dec. 7-WESTERN MICHIGAN
(Saturday)
MICHIGAN STATE vs.
TOLEDO
Dec. 23-UTAH (Monday)
Dec. 31-DAVIDSON (Tues.)
Jan. 4-IOWA (Saturday)
Jan. 7-INDIANA (Tuesday)
Jan. 18-OHIO STATE (Sat.)
Feb. 8-MICHIGAN STATE
(Saturday)
Feb. 11-ILLINOIS (Tuesday)

Road Games
Dec. 6-UNIV. OF TOLEDO at
East Lansing
Dec. 9-DUKE at Durham
Dec. 20-KENTUCKY INVITA-
21 TIONAL at Lexington
(Michigan, Kentucky,
Army, Bradley)
Dec. 28-BUTLER at Indianapolis
Jan. 11-MINNESOTA at Minne-
apolis
Jan. 21-NORTHWESTERN at
Evanston
Jan. 25-MICHIGAN STATE at
East Lansing
Feb. 1-LOYOLA OF CHICAGO
at Chicago Stadium
Feb. 15-IOWA at Iowa City

priced records

Somewhere in Follett's vast collection of monaural and
stereo LPs there are albums just for you. Albums that say
the things you feel, the things you like to hear. We have
something for the jazz fan, the folk follower, the classicalist,
the opera buff, and the soul searcher. A sage once said,
"Music is love in search of a soul." So you drop in
Follett's record department and increase your vocabulary.

I

I

ii

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan