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November 23, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-23

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Saturday, November 23, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

atda,Nvme 3 98TEMCIA AL

VIETNAM QUESTION
Fibright's committee: Thorn in Nixon's side

?)

WASHINGTON (P) - Rich-
ard M. Nixon's campaign state-
ments point to the possibility of
continued differences between
the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee and the White
House after he becomes presi-
dent.
While five of the committee's
19 members will not be return-
ing to the Senate in January,
the holdovers include several of
the veterans who battled for
years with the Johnson admin-
istration over the Vietnam war
and other international issues.
They include the chairman,
Sen. J. W. Fulbright, (D-Ark.),

who was elected this month to
a new six-year term. His op-
position to the war, voiced from
his highly prestigious post, was
a constant, major irritant to
President Johnson.
Although Nixon has yet to
detail specific legislative pro-
posals for the conduct of fore-
ign policy, his campaign state-
ments can be compared with the
views of the majority of the
Foreign Relations Committee.
The president-elect has por-
trayed the U.S. role in South
Vietnam in essentially the same
terms the current administra-
tion has used: to protect t h a t

I- _ .__- - - - - - _ d

UNION-LEAGUE

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November 18 through November 26
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country from outside aggression
from North Vietnam.
But Fulbright has constant-
ly rejected that approach, ar-
guing that the struggle is basic-
ally a civil war between ele-
ments within South Vietnam,
with this country backing one
side - the Saigon govern-
ment - and North Vietnam
supporting the other side -
the Viet Cong.
While decisions on military
policy and spending are made in
other committees, the Foreign
Relations Committee member-
ship has provided much ,of the
leading opposition to major new
military programs. -
For example, Sen. John Sher-
man Cooper, (R-Ky.), one
of the Senate's most respected
voices oneforeign policy,shead-
ed the move to delay deploy-
ment of the anti-ballistic mis-
sile system, ABM, on the grounds
that it would escalate the arms
race and reduce chances f o r
world peace.
The committee, in fact, has
already had its first indirect
conflict with Nixon's position.
Its members voted 13 to 3, with
three abstentions, for ratifica-
tion of the treaty to curb the
spread ofnuclear arms. But
Nixon's campaign opposition to
prompt action on the treaty was
seenas akey factor in the ul-
timate decision todefer a vote
by the full 'Senate.
In addition to Fulbright and
Cooper, other returning mem-
bers who have opposed a hard
line in international affairsin-
clude Majority Leader Mike
Mansfield, Albert Gore of Ten-
nessee, Frank Church of Idaho,
Claiborne Pell of Rhode Island,
all 'Democrats, andRepublicans
George D. Aiken of Vermont
and Clifford P. Case of N e w
Jersey.
Prospective new members in-
clude Sen. Gale McGee, (D-
Wyo.), who has backed the ad-
ministration's military policies
in Vietnam, and Sen. Jacob K.
Javits, (R-N.Y.), a war critic
who would be expected to bol-.
ster the stand of Cooper, Case
and Aiken on the Republican
side.
GREAT MOVIES
Every Monday
THIS: WEEK:
"THE BEST
YEARS OF
OUR LIVES"

Sen. J. William Fulbright

FAVOR DIRECT VOTE:
Hearings to consider changes
in U.S. electoral procedure

President-elect Richard Nixon

AN ICE-COLD
WARNING OF
INSIDIOUS
YOUNG EVIL
TRIUMPHANT
...a tale of seven
delinquent boys who
dive to the depths
of degradation.
Excellent performance
by young Leif Nymark
as a poker-faced,
snake-eyed leader...
an all-out, sordid
finale involving theft,
blackmail, bestiality
and suicide.
EMPHATICALLY
JOLTING!"
- Howard Thompsn, MY. Times

IT IS WRITTEN THAT4190 TIMES YOU CAN SIN AND RE FORGIVEN.
THIS MOTION PICTURE IS ABOUTTIE 491".

"POWERFUL!
There are at least two
sequences which deal with
sexual shockers. The audience
is brought very close to the
act, very powerfully so.ThereL
could he no question of the
sincerity and art intention of
this picture...It should probably
he liited to a mature,
serious-minded audience"
-Archier Witen, NMY POWt
"SHOCKING!
A violent and admittedly
shocking film; we go beyond
ho~mosexuality into perverile

JANUS FILMS-..
U

and sadism-the 'dominant
effect fulfills the purpose of
the film. The intent is a serious
and artistic one."
-Judith Crist, Herold Tribune
"ADULT!
A worthwhile film for free,
,adult minds!"
_Cue Mopozin. j -i
-c~nl ca. la. 6"*
*h.r -fWw, .in.
AGE WillS,AOMTTE:
Sat., 5:00, 7:00, 9:00

WASHINGTON (A')-New ef-
forts to change the process of
electing apresident havecstart-
ed in Congress in the wake of
the election, which barely miss-
ed being thrown into the House
of Representatives for the first
time in 144 years.
Indiana Sen. Birch Bayh, who
called a news conference to dis-
cuss the matter shortly after the
election. h a s proposed substi-
tuting the direct popular elec-
tion of the president for the
current Electoral College sys-
tem.
In the House, N e w York's
Emanuel Celler. chairman of
the Judiciary Committee, said he
will start hearings on proposed
constitutional changes as quick-
ly as possible next year.
Celler called the present sys-
tem outdated and said he is in-
clined toward a system under
which each state's electoral
vote would be divided among
the candidates in proportion to
their popular vote.
The outcome of the Presiden-
tial election hung in the bal-
ance for several hours when it
looked as if none of the three
candidates would obtain the
270 electoral votes necessary to

finally won by v e r y narrow
margins the three big states of
Ohio, California a n d Illinois,
which put him over the 270 elec-
toral v o t e level although he
and Democrat Hubert H. Hum-
phrey both had 43 per cent of
the popular vote. Independent
George C. Wallace had about 13
per cent.
If there had been no electoral
vote winner, then t he House
would have had to pick the win-
ner.
Bayh, a Democrat, introduced
a constitutional amendment to
scrap the electoral college and
replace it with direct popular
election of the president and
vice president in January 1967.
While Bayh ravors direct elec-
tion and Celler said he tended
toward a proportional plan,
Senate GOP Leader Everett M.
Dirksen said a district electoral
plan* deserves consideration.
Under the district plan, long
sponsored by Sen. Karl E.
Mundt (R--S.D.), e a c h state's
electoral votes would be allocat-
ed to districts roughly corre-
sponding to congressional dis-
tricts except t h a t two votes
would go to the popular vote
winner in the state.
Bayh's constitutional amend-

I

}
Sun
1: ' 3

dates for president a n d vice
president receiving the greatest
n u m b e r of popular votes
throughout the nation will be
elected, provided they receive
40 per cent or more of the total
vote.
If no candidate received 40
per cent of the vote, a runoff
would be held between the two
top contenders.
Bayh said the 40 per cent fig-
ure is "high enough to discour-
age small groups from splinter-
ing away from the two major
parties and low enough to as-
sure a winning plurality in all
but the most extreme circum-
stances."
One of the major objections
that has been raised against the
popular vote plan is that it
would encourage splinter par-
ties and tend to break down the
two-party system.
The present system technical-
ly is the same asthat set up by
the Founding Fathers in the
Constitution; w h i c h provides
that the president be elected by
electors chosen by the states.
The popular vote would be only
a guide of opinion and not nec-
essarily binding on the electors.
As time passed, the Electoral
College became a rubber stamp
with its members almost always
a eflecting the popular vote of
their state. But there was fear
this year that there would be
wheeling and dealing for elec-
toral votes if there had been no
v~ clear cut winner.
The Constitution also provid-
ed that if no candidate got an
Electoral College majority, the
decision would be made in the
s House with each state getting
one vote.
Thereehad been no serious
threat of this happening since
the election of 1824 when John
Quincy Adams was awarded the
presidency over Andrew Jack-
Sson, who was the leader in both
popular and electoral votes.
During the last 20 years ex-
tensive congressional hearings
have been held on the subject,
but disagreement over what
kind of change should be made
has blocked approval of any
plan.
01

the
news toda
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
A NORTH VIETNAMESE SPOKESMAN in Paris yes-
terday accused the United States of "impudent acts of
provocation" in bombarding the northern part of the
demilitarized zone.
Nguyen Thanh Le, chief spokesman for the North Viet-
namese delegation at. the Paris talks, claimed that U.S. ar-
tillary fire hit three North Vietnamese villages in the north-
ern half of the DMZ.
Le commanded the U.S. to observe and obey the 1954
Geneva agreements, which establish and guarantee the
integrity of the DMZ.
U.S. officials, who acknowledge the shelling of the zone
but denied hitting the three villages, saw the North Viet-
namese accusations as a bid for restoration of the six-mile
wide buffer zone between North and South Vietnam.
Le also called upon the United States to come to the
peace talks immediately without the Saigon government,
reserving a seat for the Thelu regime if and when it decides
to come.
Le accused the U.S. of escalating its operations into th
countries of Cambodia and Laos, and he confirmed a Thurs-
day UPI disclosure that his delegation had severed all con-
tacts with the U.S. diplomatic team.
COMMUNIST PARTIES around the world have set
May 1969 as the date for a world Communist summit
conference.
CTK, the Czechoslovak news agency, reported that 67
of the world's 88 Communist parties have agreed on the
May meeting.
Long sought by the Soviets to restore unity to the move-
ment, the conference had originally been scheduled for
November 25 but was postponed by sudden divisions appear-
ing among the parties as a result of the Soviet invasion of
Czechoslovakia.
The last such conference was held seven years ago.
Communist China and her allies are expected to boycott the
meeting.
A TERRORIST BOMB blasted a Jewish sector of
Jerusalem yesterday, killing eleven and injuring fifty-five.
A parked car loaded with TNT exploded in a crowded
market place in what was called the worst terrorist incident
in Israeli history.
Prime Minister Levi Eshkol blamed the rulers of the Arab
states for the action.
Shortly after the bombing, an enraged Jewish mob
headed for the Arab section of the Holy City shouting "Kill
the Arabs." Police divided the city with roadblocks between
the two sectors, and imposed a curfew on the Arab section
to facilitate a search for the terrorists.
STUDENT DEMONSTRATIONS swept across Italy
yesterday while the crisis in the Italian government con-
tinued.
Thousands of high school students.demanding immediate
revision of the school system clashed. with police in several
large Italian cities.
Meanwhile President Guiseppe Saragat is continuing
efforts to find a new prime minister to lead a left-of-center
coalition in place of the Christian Democratic minority gov-
ernment which broke apart last Tuesday with the resigna-
tion of Premier Giovanni Leone.
The most promising candidate for prime minister, Mar-
iano Rumor, resigned from the leadership of the Christian
Democrat Party Thursday and left the party in an uproar.
Suspension of the Christian Democratic Party Council which
followed Rumor's resignation may delay the choice of a new
prime minister which should come early next week.
NEW EXPLOSIONS within the Mannington, W. Vir-
ginia coal mine yesterday diminished chances of rescu-
ing 78 trapped miners.
Fires continue to rage out of control in the mine, and no
contact has been made with the miners since the first ex-
plosion ripped the mine early Wednesday.
The Charleston Daily Mail contended yesterday that

federal and state inspectors of the mines had discovered vio-
lations of safety procedures in the mine. This followed a
similar report Thursday by the Columbia Broadcasting Co.
that the mine had failed to pass tests during its August
inspection.
A spokesman for the U.S. Bureau of Mines, William
Parks, denied these allegations, saying that if the mine had
ii been found unsafe operations would have been stopped.

"'

Republican Richard M. Nixon ment provides that the candi-
H EAR THE VIBRANT SOUND OF
SONNY HOLIDAY and THE MASTERS
Atthe. . .
Gracious 761-3548 /
dining dailyv
p 314
from 3 P.M.-1 A.M. South Fourth Ave.
/"
G

-- --- -

ILLEL
APPENINGS
SUN., NOV. 24 at 6:00: Deli H

ouse

in

featuring a talk on
"Intermarriage & the College Student"
by RABBI SHERWIN WINE
of Temple Birmingham (Mich.)
Talk begins at 6:30
MON., NOV. 25 at 8:00
PROF. NORBERT C. KELMAN
of the psychology department speaks on
"Ethical Problems in Social Research"
RABBI MAX TICKTIN will also be present at both programs
to moderate and react.
HILLEL FOUNDATION 1429 Hill St

EROS FESTIVAL NO. 1
UNDERGROUND ALEXANDROS PANAGHOULIS, who attempted to
at the Vth Forum kill Greek Premier George Papadopolous last August, ap-
THUR. thru SUN.-1 1:00 P.M. parently will not be executed.
The decision not to shoot Panaghoulis was made by an
NEXT WEEK extraordinary cabinet meeting Thursday night, but the Greek
regime has not granted a stay of execution to the 30-year-old
ANDY WARHOL'S subversive.
"NUDE RESTAURANT" The Greek regime has bowed to worldwide pressure
Topless anti-war film against the execution, but has not yet removed the threat of
death from Panaghoulis.
Program Information 8-6416b:.:r

I

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i

1 . _ - -- _ -

I

Dial yoU-Radio WCBN 6
MONDAY 7:55 P.M.
I N

50
Lii

M O N .-- ir:.l^'- - NI^

-Next-
BARBARELLA
SHOWS
AT"
7:10 & 9:20
1-3-5-
6th
WEEK

NO 2-6264

I

f inan
~' / outrageous
bedroom romp
)R~tf0* t~oloaded with
Q~gq~lsuspicious wives,
flirtatious friends,
..a& amorous husbands,

24 G. 1

. i

I

i

_i_ 1 , Les

vmt - - - -77 - 1

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