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November 22, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

F'iri Noeme 22. 1968~ ~~I,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rx uuYr ivw.cu w c. . c.z. :. i .....,.1 I
6

TONIC
Bob Mac Ledn
and
John Campbell

GHT at
1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.
ging ORIGINAL and con-
nporary folk-music, and
-y Blues.
SATURDAY
e Three Penny Opera
folk-trio from Oberlin, Ohio)
ing ragtime, ballads, and con-
porary folk music accompo-
A by 6 & 12 string guitars, and
le.

I'.

LAW AND ORDER
States push antiriot

legislation

Page Three
Ithe
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Sertice

'4
j

L2

. . ..........

,. _ _
-------

H ILLEL
AIPPENINGS
TONIGHT at 7:15: Student Services
SUNDAY, Nov. 24 at 6: Deli House
featuring talk on "Intermarriage and the College Student"
by Rabbi Sherwin Wine of Temple Birmingham (Mich.)
Talk begins at 6:30

1'.
I

By ROBERT BRINK
Associated Press Staff Writer
Legislators alarmed by civil
disorder and violent street
crimes are toughening state
statutes aimed at curbing the
lawless, according to a national
survey.
Many states, already have in-
creased the penalties for public
disorder and have broadened
police power to deal with law-
breakers or suspected criminals
through new gun control and
so-called stop-and-frisk laws.
Other legislatures will, have
similar proposals before them
in their 1969 sessions.
Recently passed laws on riots,
gun control and stop-and-frisk
procedures dictate fines and
prison sentences in Arizona,
California, Delaware, Georgia,
Illinois, Massachusetts, Michi-
gan, Nebraska,'New York, North
Dakota, Pennsylvania, South
Carolina and Tennessee.
Arkansas, North Carolina and
Texas legislatures will soon be
considering legislation involving
riots. Arkansas, Ohio and Wis-
consin will soon take up pro-
posals on gun 'control. Stop-
and-frisk legislation will be con-
sidered by Arkansas, New Mex-
ico and - Wisconsin.
Of the states which have en-
acted or are working on anti-
riot laws, a high proportion are
Southern.
Laws passed in 1967 by the
Georgia Legislature make it a
felony to incite others to riot,
and a misdemeanor to make,
posses or toss a fire bomb.
Gov. Lester Maddox urged
passage of several antiriot bills

during the 1968 legislative ses-
sion, but all failed.
Some Arkansas legislators say
they plan to introduce in Janu-
ary bills to clarify the right of
the governor-to declare curfew,
and possibly extend that right
to chief administrators of cities
and counties. Also 'being con-
sidered are bills to provide pen-
alties for curfew violations.
The Law and Order Commit-
tee in North Carolina has been
studying the possibility of riot
laws as well as stop-and-frisk,
curfew, disorderly conduct and
other laws.
But action in these areas is
not confined to the South.
Strong antiriot laws carrying
a mandatory, no-probation, no-
parole minimum sentence of
three years were first adopted,
in the summer of 1967 in Dela-
ware.
The Michigan Legislature this
year rewrote its 1931 Riot Act.
The new act provides penalties
of up to 10 years in prison and
$10,00 for various offenses dur-
ing a riot. Omong other things,
it provides that a person who
incites others to commit cer-
tain violent crimes can receive
the same punishment spelled out
for those who actually commit
the crimes.
Then, the recommendation of
the, Pennsylvania Crime Com-
mission, a law was enacted pro-
hibiting interference with fire-
men, police and National
Guardsmen at the scene of a
riot.
Atty. Gen. Crawford Martin of
Texas says he will propose to

MONDAY, Nov.25 at 8 P.
"Ethical Problems in Social Resea

M.
rch"

a talk by Prof. Herbert C. Kel'man of the Psychology Dept.
Rabbi Max Ticktin will also be present at both programs
to moderate and reactI

,I
I

Police and their 'weapons

Hillel Foundation

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1429 Hill St.
~ j

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--

lF----

Cleopatra; Ulysses, Venus, one of the soldiers
in JEAN-LUC GODARD'S
Les Carabiners
plus: "THE FIREMAN"-CHARLIE CHAPLIN

LITTLE CLUB
featuring
the WQBMB
for listening or dancing
Friday, Nov. 22
9-12 at the Michigan League

the legislature in January five
laws, among them: one to au-,
thorize the governor to enforce
a temporary curfew and to halt
the sale of liquor, guns and gas-
oline in riot areas at the request
of local officials; another to
prohibit disturbances at public
meetings; to prohibittdemon-
strators from loitering; to make
it a felony to interfere with po-
licemen, firemen or medical
personnel during a riot.
Considerable action has also
been taken in the areas of gun
control and stop-and-frisk legis-
lation.
The 1968 session of the Gen-
eral Assembly in Pennsylvania,
for example, passed a law pro-
hibiting anyone from carrying a
firearm on public property dur-
ing an emergency proclaimed
by a municipal or state execu-
tive. It makes exceptions for
anyone actively engaged in the
defense of his life or property.
In California, a new law pro-
hibits the carrying of loaded ri-
fles or other firearms in public
places. However, hunters and

Sun., Nov. 24, 7 & 9:05
Aud. "A",

Mon., Nov. 25, 9 P.M. only
in ARCHITECTULRE AUD.

law enforcement officers are ex-
empt. Because of these exemp-
tions, legislators and districtat-
torneys have testified the meas-
ure is practically unenforce-
able.
New York has had since 1964
a stop-and-frisk law allowing a
policeman to stop a person if
the policeman believes his per-
sonal safety would be jeopard-
ized by not doing so. The law
was upheld in the state's high-
est court.
A bill to adopt a similar law
in Michigan was defeated this
year in the House of Repre-
sentatives.
The New York legislature
this year added to its penal law
a provision making it unlaw-
ful to resist arrest even, if it
turns out that the arrest was
unwarranted. Previously there
was no penalty for a person's
using force to resist an arrest he
considered false.
At the same time a much-
criticized provision in the penal
law as part of a complete over-
hauling in 1966, was corrected.
The provision had restricted the
right of a police officer to shoot
to kill a fleeing criminal or sus-
pect: it made the officer show
that the fleeing person had used
or was prepared to use deadly
force himself.
The law was changed so that
either police or homeowners
could use "deadly physical force"
if they had reason to believe
that theperson had used or
was 'prepared to use any kind
of force, not necessarily dead-
ly force.
Gov. Ronald Reagan of Cali-
fornia last yeartsucceeded in
having the legislature pass a bill
authorizing local governments
to enact more anticrime laws of
their own.
Commissions or committees
have been or are being estab-
lished in Tennessee, South Car-
olina, Nebraska, California and
Washington to conduct studies
and recommend measures for'
enactment by the legislatures
I for the control of crime.

HUNDREDS OF CZECH STUDENTS peacefully ended
a four-day sit-in strike yesterday at Charles University,
as strikes at other universities were scheduled to end
last night.
Students agreed to stop their demonstrations against cut-
backs in the government's democraticization after being told
the Prague cabinet met this morning to consider their de-
mands.
In addition, t h e government issued a solemn warning
Wednesday night that if the student-worker protests con-
tinued, Czechoslovakia would face "social upheaval."
Students at Charles, and the universities at Brno, Nitra,
and Kosice have been supported to some extent by factory
workers in their protests.
* 0 .
POLICE IN OSHKOSH, Wisconsin yesterday arrested
nearly 100 students, mostly blacks, after a violent demon-
stration that wrecked administrative offices at Oshkosh
State University.
The disorder was apparently triggered when Univeristy
President Roger E. Guiles refused to sign a list of demands
from black students. The demands included employment of
black teachers, recognition of the black students' organiza-
tion, and courses in black history.
As nine Negro students conferred with Guiles and a fac-
ulty committee over the demands, another group entered the
president's offices and overturned desks, scattered files and
shattered windows. Guiles said the damages would run into
thousands of dollars.
The students were taken in police vans to Winnebago
County Courthouse and booked on charges of unlawful as-
sembly and disorderly conduct.
A DESEGREGATION SUIT, the first ever brought
against a public housing agency by the federal govern-
ment, was filed yesterday in Little Rock, Ark.
A suit filed by the Department of Justice in a U.S. Dis-
trict Court in the Arkansas capital accuses the Little Rock
Housing Authority of separating Negroes from whites in eight
public housing projects.
The suit alleges the agency has continued to violate the
Civil Rights Act of 1964, which forbids racial discrimination
in projects receiving federal funds. T h r e e years ago, the
Housing Authority made a pledge to the Dept. of Housing and
Urban Development to comply with the law.
NORTH VIETNAMESE ROCKETS shook the U.S. Ma-
rine headquarters in Da Nang yesterday for the second
straight day of shelling around the South Vietnamese
city.
Although at least ten shells fell around the headquarters,
damages and casualties were light. U.S. artillery opened coun-
terfire on suspected launching sites, killing six North Vietna-
mese soldiers.
Several major engagements have been fought in the ar-
ea south of Da Nang this week, despite prospects for peace at
the Paris negotiating .table. Brig. Gen. Winant Sidle, chief of
public information, said "literally hundreds of U.S. patrols"
are in the area, keeping constant pressure on Communist
forces.
* . 0
HOPE OF RESCUE for 78 men trapped in a Manning-
ton, W. Va. coal mine grew dim yesterday as fire spread
through the underground shafts.
Poised rescue teams, on the alert since a series of explos-
ions rocked the mine early Wednesday, stood helpless. Heat
and billowing smoke prevented their entering the shafts in
an effort to reach the men pinned deep underground.
Officials of the Consolidated Coal Co. said efforts were
being made to control air flow into the mine by sealing air
vents.
THE CHRISTIAN DEMOCRATIC PARTY leader in
Italy, Mario Rumor, quit his post last night in the midst
of a four day-old government crisis.
Until yesterday, Rumor had been widely rated as the man
- most likely to become Italy's next premier. The resignation
came after former premier Aldo Moro stated he could not
support Rumor. It is believed that Moro, who lost his post
in last May's national election, prevented Rumor from taking
a powerful role in the party.
Moro's support was necessary for Rumor to run the party.
President Giuseppe Saragat was to open political con-
sultation today to determine a successor to Premier Giovanni
Leone, who with his all-Christian Democratic minority gov-
ernment resigned Tuesday to make room for a center-left
cabinet based on an alliance of Christian Democrats, Social-
ists and Republicans.

Eng. 'subtitles-1.25 adm.-SDS
"Eats into the mind like acid"-K. Tynan.

!ANUS FILMS presents
"AN ICE-COLD
WARNING OF
INSIDIOUS
YOUNG EVIL
TRIUMPHANT

II

L/

Thursday and Friday
BALLAD OF A,
Directed by Grigori Chukari, 1959
Considered by the N.Y. Herald Tribune to be one of
the 10 best films of 1960, Ballad of a Soldier stands I
with the films of Eisenstein, Pudovkin, and Dov- I
zhenko as an example of the finest in Russian cin-
ema. Established the revival of Russian film in the
post-war years. Awards at the San Francisco and
Cannes Film Festivals.
Short:THE BOND (Charlie Chaplin)
7:00 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871' 75C AUDITORIUM

I

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F~OX EASTERN THEATRES ;(<'
FOH VELL5E
375 No.MAPLE RD.-"769-1300
ENDS TUESDAY
MON. -THURS.-8:00
FRI.-6:30-9:15
SAT.-3 :45-6 :30-9:15
SUN.-- :00-3:45-6:30-9:15
MIRISCH PICTURES presents
W~y
$10

..a tal of seven
delinquent boys who
dive to the depths
of degradation.
Excellent performance
byyoung Leif Nymark
as a poker-faced,

'I

r

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-Next-
BARBARELLA
SHOWS
AT
7:10 & 9:20
1-3-5
6th
WEEK

snake-eyed leader...
an all-out, sordid
finale involving theft,
blackmail, bestiality
and suicide.
EMPHATICALLY
JOLTING!"
- Howard Thompson, N. Times
FRI., 7:00, 9:00 - SAT., 5:00, 7:00, 9:00

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--

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GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe

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c5Ala t _s__el __e
'e*Heart is aCllne1''tnter

Fri., Nov. 22 Noon Luncheon 25c
GARY SCHAUB, Professional Theatre Program:
"PERFORMING ARTS"

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11

1 11

FRIDAY EVENING 6 P.M.
GUILD DINNER (at cost)'
For reservations call 662-5189

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7:00

Saturday, November 23rd

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mad marvin is sexy !

Mad Marvin presents:
Underground Films at The Vth Forum
5th Avenue at Liberty 761-9700
Thursday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday: 11 p.m.
Separate admission required.
cent VI I k A E'I A"

BLONDE VENUS
and
DEVIL IS A WOMAN
Both Starring
MARLENE DEITRICH
Directed by Von Sternberg

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* - - = -= - m -

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