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November 21, 1968 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-21

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Thursday, November 21, 1 9'6$

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Thursday. November 21. 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Paae Nine

s., .,,. . . a.

PEACE TALKS TO GO ON:
Hanoi debates war tactics,
may revert to guerrila ,plan

law professor says
Hershey violates draft act

By The Associated Press greement in Hanoi on how the
The suspended peace talks in = w a r should be prosecuted. This
Paris probably will resume, but dates to the Tet offensive early
the official Communist press in this year, when Hanoi seemed to
Hanoi suggests a conviction that want its forces and the Viet Cong
it will be a long time before the to go all-out in a decisive blow.
shooting stops in Vietnam. The offensive failed, to gain its ob-
here are vague ..indications that }jectives. Since that time, the talk
the nare ofguthend warimsythein Hanoi has reverted to "pro-
the nature of the .war may be tracted war."
changi~ig, that. the Communist
side may be reverting to primary A great deal of North Vietnam's
reliance on guerrilla tactics com- domestic propaganda these days
bined w i t h political warfare in revolves about the idea that the
South Vietnam's cities; war in the South will be long, and
Both North Vietnam and the that the North, in the position of
Viet Cong's National Liberation "rear" to the Liberation Front,
Front claim victory, basing this faces a long period of austerity.
on the notion that President People are being told they must
Johnson was forced to suspend the resign themselves to the kind of
bombing and acts of war against existence they have now.
the North. But a change in tac- "We have systematized the
tics now could be the result of general, combat-oriented way of
heavy losses and thus indicate a life," said Nhan Dan, official
measure of defeat for Communist newspaper of the Lao Dong Work-
leaders. ers pai-ty in a recent article.
There have been signs of disa- The paper claimed victory over
Stuyshows Vietnam
Scauses most.protests

PRINCETON, N. J. (CPS) - A 1
recent survey of more than 8001
deans at the nation's colleges+
shows that Vietnam' was the ma-
jor cause of organized protests by
college students during the 1967-
68 academic year.
Dormitory rules, civil rights,
and student participation in col-
lege government were, in that
order, the . next most frequently
protested issues on the nation's
campuses, according to the sur-
vey by the Educational Testing
Service (ETS).
The ETS report also notes that
organized groups demonstrating
against most issues rarely made
up more than ten per cent of a
college student body. Protesters
against U.S. policy in Vietnam,
for example, averaged about five
per cent of their respective stu-
dent bodies, according to the'
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 8)
questions about working abroad an-
swered.
TEACHER PLACEMENT
The following schools have listed
Vacancies:
Caracas, Venezuela: Colegio Ameri-
cano - Jr. & Br. High Math, Jr. & Sr,
1 High Science (Gen. Science, Biol., and
Chem.)
Chelsea, Mich.: Girls Phys. Ed., Spec
Educ. (Type A).
Albion, Mich.:. Starr Commonwealth
for Boys: Cottage Child Care workers
(part or full time.) ,
pexter, Mich.: 3rd grade.'
Farmington, lMch..: Our Lady of
Mercy High Sch. English - HS.
Interlochen, Mich.: Interlochen Arts
V Academy, dorm. advisor.
For further information contact the
Placement Services, 3200 S.A.B. 764-7459.

deans' estimates. Protests not or-
ganized in advance were not in-
cluded in the findings.
ETS's questionnaire survey was
completed by deans of students
in 860 accredited four-year col-
leges and universities.

Alumnae

niay act on
bias lruling I
(Continued from page 1)
Several sororities in violation of
Panhel's resolutions are report-
edly considering establishing an
independent association apart
from the University to conduct
rush thereby bypassing the ban on
alumnae recommendations.
However, Mrs. Newell said last
night "there is a question whe-
ther those sororities would be re-
cognized as approved housing by
the University."
Advisors to at least two sorori-
ties were invited but declined to
attend the meeting. They are Mrs.
Robert Weaver, advisor to Alpha
Chi Omega, and Mrs. Roger Lin-
inger of Alpha Phi.
Mrs. Lininger said last n i g h t
shy "hopes the meeting would not
be ,interpreted as representative
of all the alumnae or all the sor-
ority women."
She said she was invited to the
session by Mrs. William C. Walz
an alumnae and national officer of
Kappa Kappa Gamma.

the Americans ror "our correct
revolutionary line" but it was not
clear just which line is being de-
fended: that of the Tet offensive1
or that of past years when guer-
rilla warfare was the order of the
day.
"We have built a pattern of life:
suitable to wartime conditions,"
it said. "The combat-oriented waya
of life has demonstrated our de-
termination to fight and defeat
the U.S. aggressors ... In t h e
present situation, to firmly main-
tain the combat-oriented way of
life is to highly demonstrate our
revolutionary offensive impetus
and revolutionary enthusiasm to1
fulfill most satisfactorily our duty
toward the anti-U.S. national sal-
vation struggle."
This duty is to step up produc-1
tion,. to see that e a c h person4
"works as two," to improve re-
sourcefulness and "not shrink be-
fore difficulties and hardships."
The "new situation" requires vigi-
lant "maintenance of public or-
der and hygiene and respect for1
state laws," among other things.I
The words "new situation,"1
cropping up frequently, are intrig-
uing. In the past few years, the
autumn has been the time when
North Vietnam's exhortations have
concerned preparation for the
"dong xuan" - the winter-spring
offensive to come. That was how
it was at this time last year.
Since the, according to Amer-
ican statistics, enemy losses in
the South have been enormous in
terms of troops killed and equip-
ment captured.
The Tet offensive appeared to
result from the thinking of Gen.
Vo Nkuyen Giap, North Vietnam's
top military man, and Le Duan,
t h e party's first secretary. Re-
cently, however, Truong Chinh,
once considered 'pro-Chinese, has
been making statements indicat-
ing that espousal of "people's war"
in the past, as opposed to the'use
of a big investment of regular
troops, had been justified.
North Vietnam in this "new sit-
uation" can negotiate for a lng
time, free of bombings and other
attacks on its soil. Hanoi still can
support the war in the same way
it supported the guerrillas before
it sent regular troops.
In the meantime, Hanoi and the
Liberation Font can revert to re-
newed political warfare in t h e
South's cities against the Saigon
regime while hoping for an ero-
sion of U.S. patience to set in.
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DICK RINI, 769-0226
STUDENTOURS, 886-0844

(Continued from page 1)
make now-whether or not t h e
student had an undergraduate II-
S after June, 1967-leads to dif-
ferent interpretations in at least
two other cases.
Donahue says that if his inter-
pretation is correct, second and
third year graduate students who
lose their II-S can still qualify
under the III-A exemption, the
fatherhood clause. Under the 1967
draft law, students who have hada
a II-S as an undergraduate since
June, 1967, are not eligible to ap-
ply for I-S and III-A deferments,
if they lose their II-S for any rea-
son.
The second case concerns stu-
dents placed in draft priorites af-
ter losing their defenments. Dona-
hue says that second and third
year graduate students should go
into the draft pool only by their
age-oldest first from 26 down-.
but Hershey would lump all stu-
dents who lost II-S deferments
into one group, which means they
would be placed at the top of the
list.
It's important that we inform
as many students as possible,"
Greg Curtner, '70L, said 1 a s t
night. Curtner has helped Dona-
hue with his work.
"A student can only get a I-S
after he's received his induction
notice, and too many people don't
know that it is available," he said.
Yale and University law profes-
sors began their legal protest
against Hershey'se interpretation
of the 1967 draft act early this.
semester. Until then, a number of
students had been denied not only
I-S deferments, but even p o s t-
ponements for the remainder of
the term.
When Hershey revealed that in-

dividual exemptions would be con-
sidered for the academic term, the
law professors who had registered
the original complaint said he still
hadn't complied with the law.
"By limiting the deferment to
the academic term rather than the
academic year, the new policy
grants the students as a matter
of administrative grace only part
of what is rightfully theirs by act
of Congress," Donahue said at
that time.
University law professors and
students haveabeen prepared for
some time to test their arguments
in court, but no opportunity has
arisen in the state. Radcliffe was
ready to serve as a test case when
he received his I-S deferment
early last week.
Two Yale professors have
brought suit in a Connecticut
court over the drafting of a law
student, Donahue said last night.
"Professors here are ready to do
the same," he added.
The attempts at delays and
stays of induction are not just ex-
ercises in legal gymnastics. Many
students feel the time saved may
make a significant difference.
"We're buying time for change,"
Radcliffe says, "Draft laws, the
status of the war, or the demands
of the draft might all change be-
tween when they first try to in-
duct someone and when his legal
alternatives expire."
The I-S ruling is important.
Sources at the University Law
School report that a significant
number of students from the sec-
ond year class have already left
because of the draft-some into
the Army, some enlistments' to
b e a t conscription, some into
teaching and other deferable pobs.

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$1,'25

Rose

Bowl

Charter

Flights

i

The University of Michigan accepts no
responsibility for charter flights other
than those under the title of University of
Michigan.
Some persons may be misled by groups
implying University sponsorship. Should
circumstances warrant such action, the
University of Michigan will again spon-
sor Rose Bowl charter flights for faculty,
staff and students.

I
.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22 8 P.M.
EASTERN EUROPE:
Land in Transition
Dr. Zvi Gitelman, Asst. Prof. of Political Science,
U-M.
Dr. Ladislav Matejka" Prof. of Slavic Studies,
U-MV.
(Dr. Mateika was in Czechoslovakia during the recent troop move-
ments and will report his personal experiences.)
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, SOCIAL HALL
1432 Waoshtenaw
Sponsored by the Ecumenical 'Compius Center and the Interfaith
Council for Peace.

1. Wowl What is it?

I

2. What happened to your Viper
Mark IV?
I just couldn't identify
with that car.

Python LTD.
Fully equipped.
8. That's what you said about
the Sidewinder Eight.
But a Python is some-
thing else. Four-on-the=
floor, six-barrel carb,
console tach... and
what a steal!

OFFICE OF STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

164-1420

IL

u

I

Have you examined al

Il

the alternatives

1,

to campus living?

Panhellenic

Tea

4. Don't you think you ought to
hold onto a car more than a
month, Chet?
When you see a great
buy coming your way,
you have toi grab it.

5. That's what'I did yesterday-
signed up for Living Insurance
from Equitable. At my age the
cost is low, and I get solid
protection now that will continue
to cover my family later when
I get married. Plus a nice
nest egg when I retire.

Union

Room 3 R-S

NOVEMBER

24

With the right set of
wheels, you'll go a
long way.

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