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November 20, 1968 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-20

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Page Six

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Ohio's Stincic 'up

for Michigan

By KAREN VAN SCHOICK
Tom Stincic is from Ohio, not
too far from the sight of this
week's sport spectacular. And he's
all psyched up for the big game
down in hometown territory.
"For those of us on the team
from Ohio," Stincic declares, "the
Ohio State game is like the Mich-
igan State game for Michigan'
guys.,
Stincic, the 6'3" anchor man for
the defense, has prepared for this
game for the past four years.
"Bump Elliott) has said for
weeks that we take each game as.
it comes along. And he's right. All
of us are ready for this one."

"I guess we'll feel we have really man to man. "It helps to equalize time in quite awhile that the
accomplished something after this things that way," he points out. Maize and Blue had been behind

week," he says.1

A senior in the physical educa-
tion department, Stincic will be
playing his last regular season
game this Saturday. He has play-
ed fine defensive ball for the past
two seasons, and has undoubtedly
won his third letter this year.
Stincic, a middle linebacker, is
currently leading the team in
tackles, but considers himself pri-
marily a team man. He sees the
defensive team as a unit and plays
"not necessarily as the coaches
see it, but as the players see it,"

Stincic had few doubts about in the scoring column. But Tom
the success of the Wolverines 1968 had no fears. "Playing in the mud
season. "We knew we had a good is miserable, and I just had to
team and we didn't pay much at-' change those wet clothes. Afterall,
tention to the pre-season polls," our defense was doing their job;
he remarks. "Our 8-1 record says :the weather just made it difficult
it pretty well for us." for our offense to score."
Reaching for roses had little to' Losing the first game of the
do with Stincic's choice of col- I year to California did not discour-
leges. "I wanted to play high age Tom either. "I don't think we
quality football and I narrowed were ready for that game," Tom
my choices down to three: Pitts- treflects. "In any event, we really
burgh, Ohio State, and Michigan," decided to fight after it was over."
he says. Aftervgraduation in Anril Tnm

4

TOM STINCIC

r -"---'- -

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University Charter Flights
CL0/V?

Actually, Tom thought Michigan
should have gone in place of Pur-
due as a second place team to the
1966 Rose Bowl game. He felt that
the following season (1967) was
primarily a 'rebuilding one for the
Wolverines, and this year is final-
ly the one he has been looking
forward to.
"Our defense is good. The first

lp l , M
hopes to be playing pro football.
He thinks he will be drafted, but
really doesn't care by whom.
"When you are in pro ball chances
are pretty good you will be play7l'
ing for a few years and you can
build with the team, so it doesn't
really matter where the team
stands when you sign with them,"
he contends.

string has only allowed nine What Stincic really feels he is
points scored against us in the past preparing himself for at the Uni-
four games. . . . and that touch- versity is a coaching career, fol-
down last week by Wisconsin had lowing of course, 4 try at pro
to be a fluke," he says. "They football.
might say it was a case of being All of this comes after Satur-
alert, but I call it luck. Their of- day's game. Right now that's the
fense (Wisconsin's) just wasn't big thing on Tom's mind. And this
Sthat potent." just may be the longest week of
Halftime last week was the first his football career.

-Daily-Larry Robbins
TOM STINCIC (90) dives into Tommy Love's knees during this year's tilt with Michigan State.
Stincic's solid linebacking has been a major contribution to the Wolverines' emergence as the
second best team defensively in the Big Ten.

t

BIG PICTURE
Michigan holds steady at

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4th in AP poll

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"y The Associated Press 33-27 to match Southern Cal's 8-0
Michigan clung tenaciously to record, held the runner-up spot,
its fourth place position in the picking up seven first place bal-
Associated Press weekly football lots, but slipped farther behind
poll by virtueof its 34-9 triumph t h e Trojans in points, 704-636.
over Wisconsin. The leaders had a'44-point rear- -
tr sgin over the Buckeyes last week.
Southern California's c o m e-
from-behind victory over Oregon Penn State, 8-0, and Georgia,
State in last Saturday's Pacific 7-0-2, remained third and fifth,
Coast showdown has bolstered the with the Nittany Lions receiving
,top-ranked Trojans' bid for the two firsts and the Bulldogs one 1
national college football champ- following impressive triumphs.
ionship. Penn State trampled Maryland
T h e unbeaten Trojans nailed 57-13 and Georgia stopped Au-
the host spot in the Rose Bowl by burn 17-3.
trimming Oregon State 17-13 with The top 20, with first-place votes,
a second half come-back. records and total points. Points award-
Ohio State, which downed Iowa ed for first 15 picks on basis of 20-18-16-6
14-12-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1:1

*

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* * *
Frosh promisIng Toledo win
By .JIM FORRESTER tackles JimBrandstatter and Guy liott running the roll-out option
What makes this day really im- Murdock, guards Reginald Mc- for 21 of those yards.
portant is that it is the day the Kenzie and Don Shaw and center .
I Ty e Charles Trick Defensively we can start where

Rose Bowl Parade tickets
seats) and box lunch

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12. Purdue 7-2 110
13. Missouri 7-2 1101
14. Oklahoma 6-3 92
15. Alabama 7-2 , 65
16. Oregon State 6-3 601
17. Ohio University 9-0 54
18. California 6-2-1 46
19. Auburn 6-3 361
20. Wyoming 7-2 161
Others receiving votes, listed alpha-
betically: Arizona, Arizona State, Army,
Harvard, Minnesota, Mississippi, North
Texas State, SMU, Syracuse, Virginia
Tech, Yale.

a
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ball clash is rehashed.
Friday last, the ,mighty Wolver-
ine football initiates met, fought
and defeated their counterparts
from the University of Toledo, 12-
6. The game was one of those
hard-fought clashes one would
read about for years if it were
played for the Big Ten title. But
it wasn't, so everybody will forget
it. Unless of course, they are true
football fans.
Who could forget that magnifi-
cent scoring strike launched
from the arm of baby Wolverine
quarterback Dennis Connell to the
waiting hands of flanker Glenn
Doughty, 42 yards away? And
when will the memory fade of the
strong, crushing rushes contrib-
uted by fullback Dave Zuccarelli
(including a one yard smash for
Michigan's second touchdown) to
further inspire the Wolverine
cause.
Other offensive players of note
were tailback Bill Taylor and split
end Mike Oldham. The offensive
line, while not spectacular, dis-
played plenty of promise with

Another offensive player worth
space in this most excellent of
journals is Bruce Elliott, son to
Pete and nephew to Bump. He
looks amazingly like his father
and uncle when they were All-
Americans twenty years ago.
Elliott spelled Connell at the
signal calling slot and led the
fledgling Maize and Blue to their
second touchdown. The scoring
drive, 58 yards long, featured El-

we left off on the offense, with
Elliott. He led a defensive back-
field consisting of himself, Tomo
Darden (who has that George
Hoey look when running with
punts and kickoffs), John Seyferth
(who also punts) and Preston Hen-
ry. This unit, with work and ex-
perience, could replace the grad- -
uating -seniors in 'the varsity de-
fensive backfield.
The defensive front four pound-
ed and thundered the sputtering
Rockets for a minus one yard in
the first half of Friday's clash, and
a meager 71 in the second as the
seond team saw plenty of action.
Defensive ends John Cilluffo and
Alden Carpenter tip the scales at
only a slight bit over 200 pounds
but are fast and tough.
The two tackles, though, are
awesome. Fred Gambeau is a 6'4"
250 pound behemoth and Tom
Beckman 'crashes 6'6" and 245
pounds into the opposition. To top
all of this off 6'6", 270 pound Leon
Hart (son of Heisman Trophy
winning Hart of Notre Dame) had
to sit out the game with an in-
jury,
Linebackers Mike Keller, Mike
Taylor and Dana Coin show great
promise with Coin a field goal
kicking prospect.
The word to the men who know
football is that Michigan scooped
just about everyone in recruiting
this year. Last week's perform-
ance is proof of this assertion.
Maybe that idiotic Big Ten rule
that says no team can go two
years a row to the Rose Bowl
should be abolished.

you've,

read it in

generation
now hear them read it!
STUDENTFACULTY
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(r - - -------- _ . -

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