100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 20, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, November 20, 1968
MURPHY CHOSEN:

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

THE MICHIGAN DAiLY Page Three

* Hard-line view on Communism
characterizes Nixon appointee

By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER
WASHINGTON (9) - President-
elect Richard M. Nixon has chosen
as his first foreign-policy repre-
sentative in Washington a diplo-
mat with a reputation for hawk-
ish, hard-line views on dealing
with Russia and Communist
China.
His reaction reinforces the im-
pression created by some of Nix-
on's own statements that the new
president will be more hawk than
dove in formulating policies on
East-West conflicts and negotia-
tions.
Former Undersecretary of State
Robert D. Murphy who became
Nixon's emissary to the State De-
partment last week, is known as a
severe critic of the U.S. response
to the Soviet Blockage of Berlin
in 1948, the compromise K o r e a n
peace settlement 15 years ago, and
the "visions" he has attributed o
U.S. leaders of coming to terms
with the Soviet Union on its own
policy of peaceful co-existence.
Nixon announced Murphy's ap-
pointment as his personal repre-

sentative to consult with Johnson
administration leaders on foreign
policy developments.
He is also to keep Nixon him-
self advised of such developments
during the two months until Nixon
is inaugurated. After that he is
expected to stay on temporarily
as an adviser.
Associatesof the president-elect
said Murphy was chosen because
of his exceptional qualifications
for the transition task. When he
retired from the foreign service in
1959 he was undersecretary of
state. He had been a troubleshoot-
er for three presidents - Roose-
velt, Truman and Eisenhower -
in the later years of a career that
spread over four decades.
In recent times he has been
quietly consulted by the Johnson
administration, and he probably,
knows as much about State De-
partment operations as any man
Nixon could have found. '
It seems highly unlikely, how-
ever, that in choosing Murphy
for such professional competence,
Nixon and his advisers would have

r---

CHILDREN OF THE GHETTO: film and discussion
THE QUIET ONE
discussion led by HAROLD COLLINS
presented by THE FORUM

been unaware of Murphy's policy
views'or found them unacceptable.
In general they can be reduced
to two propositions:
- In a struggle involving the
use of force don't be bluffed out of
victory by the Communists.
- Negotiate with the Commun-
ists only from a position of
strength.
In his book "Diplomat Among
"Warriors", published in 1964,
Murphy said the United States was
bluffed out of victory in the Kor-
ean War by fear of a greater war
withaRed China. And he wrote it
was unduly influenced earlier in
the Berlin Blockade confrontation
by fear of war with the Soviet Un-
ion.
Murphy was critical also of
President Dwight D. Eisenhower's
acceptance of personal responsi-
bility for U2 spy-plane flights over
Russia, after one plane was shot
down in 1960.
Soviet Premier Nikita Khru-
shchev subsequently wrecked an
East-West summit conference
over this issue and canceled an
Eisenhower visit to Russia.
Murphy thought Eisenhower's
action lost him a historic oppor-
tunity to exert direct influence on
the Soviet peoples.
How Murphy may apply his
views to Vietnam war issues in
any advice he gives Nixon is
not known. Presumably he would
be influenced by whether he thinks
victory is possible. He is to be
fully briefed on the situation in
Vietnam and on the Paris nego-
tiations.
Nixon himself has said "The
national interest, the interests of
our fighting men, and the interest
of peace in the world require that
this war be brought to an honor-
able conclusion as quickly as pos-
sible."
He has supported President
Johnson's peacemaking policy,
which generally defines honor-
able peace as withdrawal of all
foreign troops and self-determin-
ation for South Vietnam.
Nixon, judged by his statements,
wants either to end the war by
settlement or to de-Americanize it
by turning over the main burden
of the fight to South Vietnam's
army. Either course would allow
him eventually to move toward
his top priority of European prob-
lems, including relations with
Moscow.

McCoy reinstated
Rhody McCoy (right) listens as Dr. Herbert Johnson, trustee of the Ocean Hill-Brownsville school
district, tells newsmen that McCoy is reinstated as district unit administrator. The announcement
was made yesterday at a news conference in a Brooklyn public school, as New York City schools re-
opened for the first time in a month.
GERMAN MARK STRONG:
European monetary shake-ups
unlikely to alter dollar's value

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
SOUTH VIETNAMESE NEGOTIATORS in Paris are
reportedly preparing for the arrival of a full-scale nego-
tiating team within 11 days.
This report reinforced widespread speculation among
diplomats that President Nguyen Van Thieu is likely to end
his boycott of the peace talks, begun this month.
In Vietnam, at least 30 heavy rockets and a number of
mortars slammed into the big military base at Da Nang
yesterday and early today as Viet Cong shelled three provin-
cial capitals and six other towns.
The recent attacks on Da Nang, South Vietnam's second
largest city, are especially relevant to current peace efforts
because one of the conditions set down by President Johnson
for the continuation of the present bombing halt is an end
to attacks on major cities.
South Vietnamese officials claim there have been 68
violations of r the President's conditions for continuation of
the bombing halt since its announcement Oct. 31.
THE ITALIAN GOVERNMENT RESIGNED yesterday
in the middle of the worst nation-wide strike in the past-
decade.
The resignation of Premier Giovanni Leone's five-month-
old Christian Democrat minority Cabinet came as some two
million government employes paralyzed the nation in a 24-
hour strike.
Leone said he was quitting to clear the way for a new
center-left coalition. The strikers, members of both the
Catholic and Communist labor unions have demanded better
fringe benefits and a reform of the government system bf
advancement.
WEST GERMANY WILL TAKE urgent steps to stab-
ilize the crisis-racked balance of payments situation.
Chancellor -Kurt Georg Keisenger announced plans yes-
terday which would curb the country's soaring exports and
ease restrictions on imports.
The move met with immediate approval from the French
government which has experienced a severe monetary crisis
recently. Paris sources hailed the move as an enormous con-
cession to preserve international monetary stability.
President Charles de Gaulle's government has announced
Monday an austerity program to defend the French currency.
The German move would allow for increased sale of French
goods in Germany, helping to alleviate France's present
financial difficulties.

Wednesday, Nov. 20
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM

8 P.M.
ADMISSION FREE

Ending
Wednesday I
Pathe Contemporary Films presents Jerzy Skolimowski's
Grand Prize, Berlin Film Festival 1967

DIAL
8-6416

l ldepait
* A joy to watch.
right and real,
funny and haunting,
}= a clear-cit gem."
-The New York Times
- Thursday-H
REX HARRISON in "A FLEA IN HER EAR"

By JACK LEFLER
NEW YORK (P)-The value off
the dollars in your pocket aren't
likely to be hurt by the monetary
upheavals shaking France, West!
Germany and Britain,three lead-
ing U.S. economists say.
These experts say a possible in-
crease in the value of the German
mark and a cut in the value of
the French franc wouldn't have
a serious effect on the dollar.
But a changeinthese currencies
could weaken the shaky British
pound, whose value was reduced!
14.3 per cent to $2.40 a year ago
in an effort to bolster the faltering
British economy.
What does the value of a
French franc, a West German!
mark and a British pound have
to do with the dollars you earn
and spend?
William F. Butler, vice president#
and director of economic research
for Chase Manhattan Bank of
New York, explains it this way:
"Devaluation of the franc would
mean that things we buy from
France-such as wine-would be!
* -
It might be
{ an identity crisis...
aV
I
i-.
iu

cheaper. If the German mark were ican goods imported into Germany
upvalued it would take more dol- would be relatively lower priced.
lars to buy a German product,! This would improve the U.S. bal-
thus discouraging purchases of ance of payments problem.
German goods. The British position is touchy,
The end result, he says, would since the pound reflects variations
be that Americans would pay less in other currencies. Britain's de-
for imported goods. France, in valuation last November has not
turn, would pay more for its im- produced as rapid an economic
ported goods, thereby discouraging comeback as Britain expected. Any
the purchase of foreign products major devaluation by France
by its citizens. This would help would imperil the British move,
stop the flow of francs frqm because the benefits of devaluation
France.s accrue to a country only when
Francis H. Schott, vice presi- others do not follow suit.
dent and economist for the Equit- Ts
able Life Insurance Society of the The questions of increasing thegj
Unied tatssay realatin o Cvalue of the mark and devaluating
United States, says revaluation of the franc had been under discus-
the mark and or devaluation of sion in Basel, Switzerland, by
the franc "would be a serious bankers and government officials.
speculative problem in foreign ex- banker mengendedfficiay
changes in general." But their meeting ended Monday
"But," he adds, "there is no with no indication of a response
to the currency crisis.
reason for it to be a major effect:

0 * 0 0
THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT may do away with
elaborate investigations of welfare applicants.
The new governmental plan was instigated both by com-
plaints that the present method of administering welfare
money is demeaning to recipients and by surveys which have
shown that, in states which do not investigate, at most 11/2
per cent of those receiving aid are not eligible.
The proposal could take effect within 30 days.

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND DEPARTMENT OF ART
Present
PUCCINFS "LA BOHEME'
(English Translation by Josef Blatt)
NOVEMBER 22-23, 25-26, 8:00 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
ALL TICKETS - $3,00
MAIL ORDERS ACCEPTED NOW. Make checks payable to "University of Michigan." Send
self-addressed, stamped envelope to School of Music Opera, Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Box office opens Monday, November 18, 1968, 12:30 to 5:00 P.M.

i
E

on the dollar. Revaluation of the
mark would help the dollar."
The reason the dollar would
benefit is that Americans would
be less willing to pay higher prices
for German goods and that Amer-
DIAL 5-6290
Daily at 1:00-3:45-6:30-9:10
Now for the
first time
at popular prices.
Direct from
its reserved-seat
engagement.

Some feel that the mark is un.-
dervalued in relation to currencies
of other countries in view of West
Germany's strong international
trade position.
Butler said upward revaluation
of the mark would "help-interna-
tional financial structures by
making it more difficult for Ger-
many to export because German
products cost more than other cur-
rencies and would encourage im-
ports into Germany because they
cost less."
- - - -

i

1

CZECH STUDENTS, some 100,000 strong, continued
to hold their universities yesterday in a bid for various
freedoms in the Soviet-occupied country.
The purpose of the strike has been to "wake up" the
Czech people to conditions in the country. Students report
good relations with workers, and citizens around the country
have begun signing resolutions to demonstrate their solidar-
ity with thee government of Alexander Dubcek.
YOUNG ARMY OFFICERS staged a successful and
apparently bloodless coup in Mali yesterday.
The new government replaces President Modibo Keita,
one of Africa's most prominent revolutionaries. The military
men, lead by Lt. Moussa Traeore, claimed they had taken
power from the dictator until free elections could be held.
Keita had run the country since it received independence
from France in 1960. Under his leadership, there was a heavy
influx of Communist Chinese influence. But recently, Keita
had turned back to the United States for economic aid.
THE SUPREME COURT yesterday gave extremist
groups a better chance of holding public rallies.
The court ruled that governmental authorities can bar
them from meeting only if the prospective speakers first have
a chance to fight for their right to speak in court.
THE UNITED NATIONS GENERAL ASSEMBLY
again refused to seat Communist China yesterday.
The vote of 58 against, 44 in favor and 23 abstentions was
the strongest majority in the last four years received by
those wishing to block Communist China's entry into the
United Nations. It was the 18th time in 19 years that the
assembly has voted on the question.

-r

Winner of 3
Academy Awards!
TECHNICELOR*PANAVISN'
FROM WARNER BRAS.-SEVEN ARTSM?

Michel Ange
GODARD'S
LES CARABINIERS
SUNDAY, NOV. 24-Aud. "A"
7 and 9 p.m.
MONDAY, NOV. 25-Arch.
9 p.m. only
"A great movie. "-Renata Adler,
N.Y. Times
Also CHAPLIN. $1.25
SIDS

1

Appearing

WEDNESDAY
NOV. 20, 1968
8:00 p.m.
MICHIGAN UNION
BALLROOM
Tickets Available
Mon.-Tues.-Wed.
Diag and Fishbowl
and at the door

I

I

DUE TO CIRCUMSTANCES BEYOND
OUR CONTROL
The
3D HAPPENING
will be
POSTPONED
till next semester

"

A HOO
An informal 'evening of en
variety-come and do yourt
and sing along.
THURSDAY
-IS LIBERALISM
sonekinn.ARNOLD KAUFA

TONIGHT at
IT
ndless musical
thing or listen
DEAD? 1421 Hil St.
" k \f ( S ..L8 :30 P.M.

0

0

I

I

'A

MAN--U. of

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan