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November 19, 1968 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-19

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MMM09

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, November 19, 1968

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Bowl committees vie for kingpins

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. By The Associated Press
The first bowl invitations were
issued yesterday, hnd several bowl
comiittees were left scrambling
for the leftovers.
Least affected by the NCAA
ruling that prevented any legal in-
vitatiOns until yesterday, the Rose
Bowl follows its traditional pat-
tern.
That means that Southern Cal,
the Pacific Eight champ, will face'
someone from the Big Ten-that
someone to be decided on the turf
at Columbus Saturday.
A win gives Michigan its fifth
Mew Year's trip to sunny Califor-
nia; a lose or a tie gives the roses
to Ohio State.
Meanwhile, a coup engineered
by the Sugar Bowl robbed the
'Orange Bowl of Georgia, the

Southeastern Conference cham-,
pions.
The latter has invited the' Nit-
tany Lions of Penn State, cham-
pions of the .East, and the Kansas
Jayhawks of the Big Eight.
However, when Kansas was up-
set last week by Oklahoma, Orange
Bowl attention turned to Georgia.
Then, in the middle of last
week, a Sugar Bowl spokesman re-
ported that Georgia had been (f-
fered a bid with no-strings,. at-
tached.
The Bulldogs, facing a tough
game with Auburn, decided to grab
it rather than gamble on winning
the game and scooping up the
larger Orange Bowl jackpot.
Penn State, which nonetheless
was the first choice of the Orange
Bowl for weeks, will be making its
first appearance in the Miami
classic to be played New Year's
night. Kansas appeared here once
before, losing to Georgia Tech in
1948.
It is Georgia's first Sugar Bowl
invitation since the Bulldogs belt-

SENIORS AND JUNIORS!
Today is the day to pur-
chase backetball tickets. -
ed North Carolina 20-10 in 1947.1
However, it will be the 12th bowl
game, with Georgia sporting a
7-3-1 record in post-season play.
The fifth-ranked Bulldogs will
probably battle either Arkansas or.
Texas Jan. 1 at New Orleans.
Over in Dallas, the colorful Ten-
nessee Volunteers of the South-
easter'n Conference were named to.
play in the 33rd annual Cotton
Bowl classic.
It will be the third appearance
for the Volunteers as the guest
team of host Southwest Confer-
ence foes-either Texas or Arkan-
sas, whoever loses the Sugar Bowl

Wolverine Basketball Coach
Johnny Orr said yesterday that
Rudy Tomjanovich has b e e n
fitted with a back brace to aid
his ailing back.
T h e high-scoring forward
worked out at practice yester-
day afternoon, 'the first time
Iafter a one-week lay-off. Doe-
tors are not sure as to the exact
nature of Tomjanovich's injury
but think it may be a spinal
disc ailment.
"W i t h the brace he can't
maneuver like he should," re-
ported Orr, "but we had a pret-
ty tough practice today, and
afterwards he told me that his
back didn't hurt him so much."
Orr added, "All I can say is
that he's on the mend."

Professional

bid.
As the bowls get smaller: Mis-
souri has accepted a bid to play
in 'the 24th annual Gator Bowl
at Jacksonville, Dec. 18. Its op-
ponent maybe be Alabama, but
Wyoming, Florida State, and Ari-
1 StandingsI
Sunday's Results
Houston 38, Denver 17
Cincinnati 38, Miami 21
Kansas City 31, Boston 17
Oakland 43, New York 32
San Diego 21, Buffalo 6
Sunday's Games
Buffalo at Denver
Miami at Boston
New York at San DiegoI
Oakland at Cincinnati
only games scheduled

New York
Houston
Miami
Boston
Buffalo

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Eastern Division
W L T Pet. Pts. OP
7 3 0 4.700 232 200
5 6 0 .455 213 221
3 6 1 .333 180 272
3 7 0 .300 162 275
1 9 1 .100 151 285

Wiestern Division
Kansas City 9 2 0 .818 277 150
Oakland 8 2 0 .800 339 169
San Diego 8 2 0 .800 290 176
Denver 4 6 0 .400 164 262
Cincinnati 3 8 0 .273 187 235

zona are also listed as possibili-
ties.
Houston's Astrodome will host
Oklahoma and Southern Meth-
odist on New Year's Eve in the:
Bluebonnet Bowl.
So when. it comes down to the
Liberty Bowl, the officials have
been forced deferred a decisionI
foi the Dec. 14 game. Louisiana
State, Florida State, Missouri, Au-
burn, and Mississippi are still un-
der consideration.
And last but not -least, officials
of the newest post-season game,
the Peach Bowl, are unable to line,
up a match.
"We're right back where we
started from," said Jim Corbett,;
official of the Dec. 30 night game
after a day which saw a flurry,
of invitations take all the best
schools.
'M' water polo
men sink State'
for sixth rin
By ROD ROBERT
Michigan's water polo team re-
sorted to a full-court press in the
second half to sink MSU 13-11
Sunday afternoon at East Lan-
sing.
Capitalizing on numerous mis-
takes by their opponents, the
Wolverine team surged to its sixth
win of the year.
They had to come from behind,
however, as Michigan was on the
short end of a 7-6 halftime score.
Early in the game, State players
were able to break into the clear
to set up easy goals, as some
Michigan man missed his defen-
sive assignment. In Coach Gus
Stager's words, "Our play was!
pretty sloppy at first."
The full-court press changed
all that, as Wolverine players
hounded Michigan State merci-
lessly, forcing them to throw the#
ball away time and again.
Led by Mike Allen and Mike
O'Connor, Michigan came roar-
ing back and were on top 13-9
with three minutes remaining.
Stager was quick to compli-
ment his steadily improving play-1
ers. "The victory was a real team
effort. Everyone just wore State
down with that full-court press."
He then added, "Allen was great
as usual."
And, as usual, he was.
High scorer at the Indiana In-
vitational Tournament two weeks
ago, Allen had four goals. But
more important was his ball hand-
ling, which played a part in al-
most every Michigan score.
Senior Mike O'Connor also
proved to be an offensive threat
with three goals to his credit.
This Saturday the team travels
to Ohio State to play its final
game of the season after THS
football'game.

uoug nelier

Ohio State's debt
Ohio State owes Michigan one championship.
The Wolverines' biggest rival of all time (Michigan State is a
Johnny-come-lately), received a great favor from Michigan and it's
time to pay it back.
Last winter, the Buckeye basketball team was in a tense
fight with Iowa for the Big Ten championship.'But with one game
to play, the Hawkeyes had a one-game lead over OSU, and only
had to get by also-ran Michigan for the crown.
Ohio State basketball coach Fred Taylor was desperate. In his
anxiety, he offered then-Wolverine mentor Dave Strack a varsity
'O' blanket if Michigan could beat Iowa in their Iowa City pit. Strange
to relate, the Wolverines pulled off one of the biggest upsets of the
year and knocked the Hawkeyes, 71-70. And Strack got a blanket.
The result left OSU and Iowa in a flatfooted tie for the crown.
In the playoff to determine the conference representative to the
NCAA tournament, Ohio State beat the Hawkeyes.
Shortly thereafter, in the NCAA's, the Buckeyes overcame East
Tennessee and Kentucky before losing to North Carolina. And in
the consolation finals of the tournament, OSU stunned highly-rated
Houston to snatch up the third spot in the nation.
Not bad for a team that needed help to win its own conference
championship.
So now things come down to Saturday's cork popper in
Columbus. Unlike the case of the two basketball coaches, anybody
who has met Wolverine mentor Bump Elliott and Buckeye chief
Woody Hayes has a clear-cut idea of who are the "good guys"
and the "bad guys" in this contest. Just ask a high school foot-
ball prospect who has been ,recruited by both men.
Similarly, there is a definite distinction between the g6od and
the bad when discussing the two schools academically, or any other
way for that matter.
After all, Michigan doesn't have a sick line "Don't send my
son to Michigan, I'd rather see him dead" in the fight song, do
they?
Therefore, the problem is how to collect old debts from the
meanies, since Hayes is not about to roll over and drop dead for any-
body.
It's clear that Ohio State does not want to give back the cham-
pionship that it owes. Therefore, the Wolverines will just have to go
out and take it from him.
If Hayes does reconsider, though, we'll give him an 'M'
blanket if he wants one.
Green- Bay's return
For all those who rejoiced at the demise of the New York
Yankees, and who hate the Montreal Canadiens and Boston
Celtics, the rise of another spectre from the dead cannot be any-
thing but dreaded news.
The Green Bay Packers are coming back. They almost should
be favored to win the Central Division title in the N4FL as of right now.

S

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Eastern Conference

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Gridde Pickings
Charles Chamberlain of the Associated Press yesterday picked
Ohio State to defeat Southern California in the Rose Bowl, 21-17.
How about that?
Breathes there a soul at this U who might disagree that Charlie
is the last word in prophecy? If there be, he is hereby invited to
express his selection in this year's last and final Gridde Pickings,
and he might even end up one yummy pizza richer.

Dallas
New York
Washington
Philadelphia
Cleveland
St. Louis
New Orlean
Pittsburgh

Capitol Division
WV L T Pct. Pts.i
8 2 0 .800 3121
7 2 0 .700 2322
z 4 6 0 .400 1872
a 0 10 0 .0001312
Century Division
7 3 0 .700 2622
5 4 1 .556 2332
s 3 7 0 .300 1682
2 7 1 .222 1852

Oi146
200
275
263
202
230
241
280

Western Conference

i

But those so full of apathy as
go soak their heads in the Medit. Se
FINAL EDITION
1. MICHIGAN ..at ohio state
(pick score)
2. Michigan State at North-
western
3. Minnesota at Wisconsin
4. Iowa at Illinois
5. Indiana at Purdue
6. Ransas at Missouri
7. Duke at North Carolina
8. Oregon at Oregon State
9. Southern Cal at UCLA

not disagree with Charlie

can

Baltimore
Los Angeles
San Francis
Atlanta

10. Baylor at SMU
11. Syracuse at West Virginia
12. Harvard at Yale
13. Alabama vs. Auburn at
Birmingham
14. Cornell at Princeton
15. Miami (Fla.) at Florida
16. Maryland at Virginia
17. Nebraska at Oklahoma
18. South Carolina at Clemson
19. Washington vs. Washington
State at Spokane
20. Pomona at Occidental

Coastal Division
9 1 0 .900
8 1 1 .889
co 4 5 1 .444
2 8 0 .200
Central Division
6 4 0 .600
5 5 .0 .500
4 5 1 .444
3 6 1 .333

293
217
197
139
216
180
203
160

108
131
220
290
153
238
150
188

Minnesota
Chicago
GreenBay
IDetroit

4

. . .-

Sunday's Results
Cleveland 45, Pittsburgh 24
Dallas 44, Washington 24
Minnesota 13, Detroit 6
Los Angeles 20, San Francisco 20, tie
New York 7, Philadelphia 6
Atlanta 16, Chicago 13
Green Bay 29, New Orleans 7
Baltimore 27, St. Louis 0
Sunday's Games
Atlanta at St. Louis
Dallas at Chicago
Green Bay at Washington
Minnesota at Baltimore
New Orleans at Detroit
New York at Los Angeles
Philadelphia at Cleveland
San Francisco at Pittsburgh

With four games left on the schedule, the Packers stand at
4-5-1, one-half game behind Chicago and one-and-one-half
games behind Minnesota, the leader. The catch is, that Minnesota
and. Chicago both play a rougher schedule than Green Bay from
here on out.
Minnesota must face Baltimore, Los Angeles, San Francisco and
Philadelphia. Chicago has yet to meet Dallas, New Orleans, Los
Angeles and Green Bay. The Packers will play Washington, San Fran-
cisco, Baltimore and Chicago.
The Detroit Lions face four crummy teams and could very well
beat them all. It won't make any difference, however, as the loss to
Minnesota Sunday made their record 3-6-1, and for all practical
purposes finished them off.
Now, assuming Chicago without Gayle Sayers and Virgil Carter
is a dead pigeon, only Minnesota and Green Bay are left in the race.

I____ __

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1217 S. University 769-0560

If Minnesota loses to Baltimore and Los Angeles, as expected,
and Green Bay is defeated by Baltimore, Minnesota would lose
a full game of its lead. With the remaining difference one-half
game, the key contests shape up as the confrontations between
each of these teams and San Francisco.
The 49'ers are below .500 but managed to tie Los Angeles this
past Sunday, 20-20. For Green Bay to win the conference title the
Packers must beat San Francisco while the Vikings lose to them.
It really isn't as improbable as it sounds. Green Bay plays the
49'ers after this week's breather at Washington, while the Vikings must
face them immediately following their two battles with the Rams and
the Colts.
As things stand, the Central division race, which has been one
big puzzle right from the beginning, has narrowed down to a two-
way fight between its first and THIRD place teams.

w
7''
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t 1 ' s'"
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