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November 14, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-14

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Thursday, November 14, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

TH.IHGA.AL Pg he

'68 election: Change in Presidency, parties, ca binelj

By CARL P. LEUBSDORF
WASHINGTON VP) - T h e
1968 election has opened the
way for a period of consolidat-
ing, and streamlining of the
government after eight years of
rapid growth.
In the next few years, lead-
ers of both parties feel that the
central issue will not be whe-
ther the federal government is
to play a role in such fields as
education, consumer affairs and
urban problems but how much
and what kind.
And the structure of the gov-
etnment itself, especially t h e
department dealing with domes-
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tic affairs, and the broad area
of federal-state relations, a r e
likely to become subjects of in-
creasing debate.
In a sense, the second half of
the Johnson administration has
marked a watershed between the
old New Deal type of federal aid
program and newer kinds of
programs involving broad co-
operation between the govern-
ment and private enterprise.
In -part, this has been forced
on the government by the Viet-
nam expenditures producing
large federal deficits and cur-
tailing direct new spending pro-
grams. But it also represents an
increasing awareness that the
old boundary lines between the
government and the private sec-
tor have dissolved.
Thus, the model cities pro-
gram, last of the major Johnson
domestic programs to win ap-
proval, has tended to rest heav-
ily on efforts to get private in-
vestors, such as the insurance
companies, to put up funds for
urban development.
A similar, pattern is develop-
ing in some other areas, such as
the Appalachian regional pro-
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gram, and in efforts to find jobs
for hard-core unemployed.
President-elect Richard M.
Nixon has indicated he thinks
the private sector should be the
major element in future urban
programs, aided by tax credits
which Congress is expected to
be reluctant to vote. A com-
promise may result, similar to
the pattern of model cities.
There may also be balking in
Congress, especially in the com-
mittees which wrote the origi-
nal legislation, to Nixon's an-
nounced intention of scrapping
the Job Corps, generally seen as
a forerunner to a complete over-
haul and possible dismantle-
ment of the Office of Economic
Opportunity.
But there will be no disagree-
ment from key congressional
leaders on the need to overhaul
and simplify the overlapping
federal grant programs that
have brought so many com-
plaints from local officials qe-
cause of the paperwork involved
in getting the federal funds.
In fact, it has been S e n a t e
Democratic leader Mike Mans-
field who has repeatedly stress-
ed the need for congressional
study of the way new programs
are functioning. With Repub-
licans in power, congressional
Democrats may be more eager to
do this than they have been un-
til now.
When it comes to federal-state
relations, Sen. Edmund S. Mus-
kie of Maine, the defeated Dem-
ocratic vice presidential candi-
date, is considered one of the
leading experts, and his inter-
governmental relations sub-
committee could become a key
source of possible reforms.
There is broad support, too,
for decentralization of federal
programs. Both presidential
candidates called this year for
some sort of tax sharing plan,
involving turning over federal
revenues to the states, along the
lines of .the proposal made four
years ago by economist Walter
W. Heller but never adopted by
the Johnson administration.
One of the big question marks
is how far events, especially in
the cities, will shape a N i x o n
administration.
. For one thing, any end to the
Vietnam war will almost cer-
tainly generate demands f r o m

Congress and elsewhere for
stepped up federal spending on
education and the cities. Nixon
has indicated he favors tax re-
ductions and increased defense
spending.
In addition, Nixon has the
political problem of broadening
his base of support to what pol-
lster Louis Harris calls t h e
"change coalition," the racial
minorities and the growing
number of affluent suburbanites
who favor government action to
improve the quality of society
and its institutions.
Harris said in a talk last week
to the National Press Club that
Nixon was elected primarily by
"the more responsible elements"
of what he called the "no
change coalition" but that this
group is dwindling.
He said Nixon probably re-
ceived a majority vote this time
from members of the "change
coalition" because of the Viet-
nam war and the feeling that a
change was needed.
But he said the new president's
crucial test will be how well he
can build bridges to this group,
expected to grow from 25 per
cent of the electorate to 35 per
cent over the next four years, so
that he can maintain this sup-
port if he seeks an expected
second term in 1972.
This will determine not only
the shape of his administration,
but ultimately, Harris said,
which party becomes dominant
in the 1970s.
ens rebuild
House power
In the meantime, however, the
Democratic party, preparing to
relinquish national power after
eight years, finds itself with a
strong congressional base but
in needof considerable rebuild-
ing across the nation.
Republicans, on the other
h a n d , have their greatest
strength in the states but are
hoping that President-elect
Richard M. Nixon will set a na-
tional pace that will finally
bring congressional break-
throughs in the 1970 and 1972
elections.
The strong Democratic show-

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ing in congressional races,
where they lost a net of only
four House seats, confirmed
their view that the 1966 losses
cut the party back to its hard-
rock strength in many Northern
areas.
Heavily financed, vigorous
GOP challenges failed to dis-
lodge Democratic incumbents
in many marginal districts and
states, even as Nixon was run-
ning ahead of Democratic can-
didate Hubert H. Humphrey in
those areas.
In 1970 the Democrats hope
to benefit from the usual mid-
term gains by the party out of
power, even though they will
again have to defend a number
of Senate seats in normally Re-
publican states and House seats
in the large Eastern states where
Nixon ran weakest.
It is these big states that pre-
sent for the Democrats both
their brightest promise and
their biggest problem.
In one after another, the party
machinery is virtually in sam-
bles, and the top positions are
in Republican hands. Thus, in
New York, Pennsylvania, Michi-
gan, Ohio, Illinois, and Califor-
nia, the Democrats have no
governors and only three of 12
senators-Philip A. Hart in
Michigan, newly elected Alan
Cranston of California and 79-
year-old Stephen M. Young of
Ohio.
The fact that Humphrey car-
ried New York, Pennsylvania
and Michigan, and ran relative-
ly well in the other states de-
spite severe organiational han-
dicaps, means that the Dem-
ocrats have a good chance to
make comebacks, provided they
can reorganize and pick attrac-
tive candidates.
In the meantime, they will
face next year a gvernor's
electionein New Jersey, where
Democrat Richard J. Hughes is
nearing the -end of his second
and last four-year term. Their
leading possibilitynisformer
Gov. Robert Meyner, but sev-
eral of last weeks congressional
winners are also possibilities.
Other major elections next
year will be in such big cities
as New York, Los Angeles, Pitts-
burgh and Cleveland, where
Democrats will be trying to re-
tain power.
The Democratic record on the
national level may play a con-
siderable role in the party's
long-range prospects. For one
thing, Nixon, as president, will
camp5aign in 1970 for an end
to divided government by elec-
tion of a Republican congres-
sional majority. A constructive
Democratic record would help
defeat such plea.
Senate Democratic Leader
Mike Mansfield of Montana, one
of the least partisan of congres-
sional leaders, has already point-
ed the way to such an approach.
In the absence of any strong
Democratic leadership in the
House, Senate Democrats seem
likely to become the party's
chief national spokesmen.

The presence there of Sens.
Edward M. Kennedy, Eugene J.
McCarthy, George S. McGov-
ern and Edmund S. Muskie,
plus newly elected Harold E.
Hughes of Iowa, virtually as-
sures this.
As for Humphrey, many Dem-
ocrats feel their defeated can-
didate can best serve this party
by working to initiate the re-
forms in party structure voted
at the Democratic convention,
so that the party will be able
to widen its popular base look-
ing toward 1972, especially
among the younger and non-
white vioters who are suspicious
of the incoming Republican ad-
ministration.
Cabinet leaves
bef ore'boss'
Robert C. Weaver, first Ne-
gro Cabinet member in history,
is expected to be the next top
ranking official to quit Presi-
dent Johnson's service, follow-
ing Undersecretary of State
Nicholas Katzenbach and Sec-
retary of Treasury Henry B.
Fowler.
Katzenbach and Fowler hand-
ed in their resignations Friday
becoming the first to follow the
traditional practice of high pres-
idential appointees whose boss
is leaving office.
Weaver, secretary of housing
and urban development, report-
edly is planning to leave before
the end of the year to become
president of the Bernard Baruch
School of Administration in New
York.
Nearly all of the other top
men say they plan to stay on
until the inauguration of Rich-
ard M. Nixon or-as Atty. Gen.
Ramsey Clark put it-"until the
bell rings."
Nixonghas not disclosed any
of his Cabinet choices, but he
said during the campaign that
they might include a Democrat
or two.
No member of the Cabinet in
recent times has been held over
by an incoming administration
of a different party.
Agriculture Secretary Orville
Freeman, one of the three hold-
overs from the original Ken-
nedy Cabinet, plans to join
EDP, a Washington-based com-
puter consultant firm. Secre-
tary of State Dean Rusk, who
joined the Cabinet from the
Ford Foundation, has told
friends he wants to relax for
awhile.
Katzenbach, who left a spe-
cific date for his departure up
to the President, is going to be-
come vice president and general
counsel for IBM, State Depart-
ment officials said.
Wilbur J. Cohen, secretary of
health, education and welfare,
told a news conference Friday
he plans to return to the Uni-
versity of Michigan to teach, but
added he'll stay till the end of
Johnson's term.

news..to day
by The Associated Press and Colege Press Service
THE NATIONAL LIBERATION FRONT yesterday de-
manded that the United States resume the Paris talks,
with or without representatives of the South Vietnamese
government.
Duong Dinh Thao, no. 2 negotiator for the NLF in Paris
said if Saigon does not send a delegation, then the three
parties-the NLF, North Vietnam, and the United States-
must meet without delay. He declined to say what effect a
delay would have on the future of the talks.
Meanwhile, as relations between the U.S. and South
Vietnam dropped to a new low, the possibility that South
Vietnam would agree to attend talks moved no closer.
South Vietnamese Information Minister Ton That Thien
yesterday reiterated Saigon's demand for recognition as the
top negotiator for the allied side, and a subordinate roll for
the NLF on the Communist side.
Thien warned that unless his government participated,
any agreement made at the talks will not be recognized or
observed by the government.
Thien's remarks came in response to Defense Secretary
Clark Clifford's statement of Tuesday which charged that the
Saigon government reneged on an agreement to participate
in the talks.
THE SOVIET UNION urged the admission of Com-
munist China to the United Nations yesterday.
Calling for the expulsion of Nationalist China, Soviet
Ambassador Jacob Malik told the, UN General Assembly that
the Soviet stand was a matter of principle, and not related
to the "transitory nature" of Russia's relation with the
People's Republic.
French Ambassador Armand Bernard supported the
Soviet proposition, saying that the seating of mainland
China would recognize existing political realities. Both Britain
and France support UN -membership for China.
In other UN action, Canada called for the United States
and the Soviet Union to enter into strategic arms limitation
talks before the end of the year.
This plea came in the wake of Malik's offer on Tuesday
that the Soviets stand ready to open disarmament talks, The
United States has dropped all plans for talks since the Soviet
invasion of Czechoslovakia.
PANAMA'S MONTH-OLD JUNTA received diplomatic
recognition from the United States yesterday.
The State Department decision to set up normal ties
with the military government withholds resumption of its
$14.2 million aid program to Panama.
Relations between the two countries were suspended
four days after Col. Jose Pinilla ousted Panamanian President
Arnulfo Arias October 11. Arias had served two weeks of his
four-year elected term.

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PRESIDENT-ELECT RICHARD NIXON planst
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to

GieGf eart is aG~onelyj iunter

Box Office
Open
Doily
at
12:30

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ii

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I!

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND DEPARTMENT OF ART
Present

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Wednesday - Saturday

i

11

Ann Arbor Art Association
Anu l 1day Craft Sale
November 15
YW-YMCA 1O:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.
Ceramics, Enamels, Jewelry,
Textiles, Christmas Cards

PUCCINI S
"LA BOHEME"
English Translation by Josef Blatt)
NOVEMBER 22-23, 25-26, 8:00 P.M.
Lydia Mendelsesohn Theatre
ALL TICKETS - $3.00
MAIL ORDERS ACCEPTED NOW. Make checks payable to "University'
of Michigan." Send self-addressed, stamped envelope to' School of ,
Music Opera, Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Box office opens Monday, November 18, 1968, 1230 to 5:00 P.M.
Russ Gibbs Presents in Detroit
Capital Recording Stars
Steve Miller Band
FRIDAY and SATURDAY NIGHT
8:00-1:00AM. Adm. $3.50
SUNDAY direct from England
The Mood Blues
two performances

I

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0

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1

Slated for elimination are the positions of Presidential
press secretary and appointments secretary.
Nixon announced that H. R. Haldeman, a Los Angeles
advertising executive, will handle general administrative
matters and the President's daily schedule in the new admin-
istration.
Under the new system, Haldeman will become one of
three or four assistants to the President who will be involved
in general planning rather than details.
!-! .
APOLLO 10 ASTRONAUTS were named yesterday for
a mission in late 1969 that may include a landing on the
moon.
The Houston Space Center named Air Force Col. Thomas
Stafford, the fight's commander; Navy CMdr. Eugene Cernan,
lunar module pilot, and Navy Cmdr. John Young, command
module pilot.
CHICAGO MAYOR RICHARD DALEY said yesterday
that street violence during the Democratic Convention
had nothing to do with Vice-President Hubert Hump-
hrey's election defeat.
Asked at a press conference if he thought that the August
violence had any effect on the election, the Democratic Party
kingpin replied: "No, I don't see how it could."
COLUMNIST DREW PEARSON said yesterday that
Richard Nixon was under psychiatric care while he was
vice-president.
In a National Press Club speech, Pearson said that New
York psychiatrist Arnold Hutschnecker had advised Nixon
on psychiatric problems, quoting the doctor as saying "Nixon
did have the problem of not standing up under great pres-
sure."
Hutschnecker and a Nixon aide denied the report.
LAST CHANCE TO ENJOY HEARING
RONNIE ROSS and CAROLE WALLER
and THE CIRKUS
0 at the L
r0
Fine food daily 314 South 4th Ave. (
fJfrom 3 P.M. -1 A.M. 761-35480
'V o rn

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"TH E PUMPKIN EATER"
By HAROLD PINTER
with ANN BANCROFT
PETER FINCH
BEST ACTING AWARD
CANNES FILM FESTIVAL

{ --------the unbelievable - -
Dave Van Ronk
THIS weekend at
W~I!BIQl'(YIT OUSB

NOV. 15-16

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8 :00 P.M.

FREE GOODI ES

$2.00 at the door ($1.50 after 2nd set)

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15

11

1

See the filmed documentary

I'

1"ie"Na Dalog"
The story of U.S. involvement in Viet Nam, the Paris
Peace Talks and their relation to U.S. domestic
problems, as narrated by David Schoenbrun.

North Campus Committee with -
the Endorsement of IHA and Bursley Council
presents
FADING FALL
a candlelight dinner dance

5:30 and 8:30

Adm. $4.50

I

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