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November 13, 1968 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-13

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday.,-Nave ber 13. 1968

._. - _ .. i i

Persian
Hostess Gowns

Goss

0

0

inspires

Big

Ten's

roughest defense

Short and Long
The Medina Shop
420 Maynard St. 663-4540

f
MONDAY
- i
MORNING?.
ADVERTISERS
Due to the increasing amount of
Display Advertising# the Deadline
for Tuesday's Daily has been
changed to 12 noon Monday.

By PHIL BROWN
In case you hadn't noticed,
Michigan is leading the Big Ten
in scoring defense after f i v e
conference games.
There might be any number
of reasons for this, but one of
the best is probably the presence
of Tom Goss in the Wolverine
defensive line.
Goss, whom head football
coach Bump Elliott once re-
ferred to as one of the team's
real inspirational leaders, has
been a major factor in two
straight shutouts of conference
opponents.
Defensive line coach Dennis
Fitzgerald notes Goss has two
outstanding attributes as a foot-
ball player, but declines to rate
one above the other. "Tom has
quickness and a great attitude."
"He is very definitely a lead-
er on the field. He probably
played his greatest game this
year against Duke - it was a
big game for us, coming off an
opening loss . . . there was some
doubt that we could be a con-
tender."
"He did a great job down
there, putting on big pass rushes
and getting a lot of tackles for
losses. His performance gave us
a big boost.''
Since Goss is not from Mich-
igan, the annual battle with
MSU has not meant as much to
him as it does to some of the
players. But this year the game
had special significance for him
just the same.
"I've been here for five years
- I was red-shirted as a sopho-
more," he says, "and we on 1 y
beat Michigan State once dur-
ing that time. State doesn't mean
that much to me, but getting
beat by one team year after year
just made me mad."

diminish the importance of the
players' "getting up" for each
week's game.
"I have my own way of get-
ting up," says Goss. "Most of
the guys do - the younger guys
usually get fired up by the
coaches' pep talks and the old-
er ones psych themselves up.
"I like to relax the night be-
fore the game; if I think about
it I can't sleep. But when I wake
up the next morning," he con-
tinues, waving a finger emphat-
ically, "then - that's when I
get mentally ready.
"Being a lineman you have to
be mean, so I work myself into a
mean mood. If you saw me the
morning of a game I probably
wouldn't even talk to you. By
the time the game starts I can
hardly wait to hit somebody."
Oddly enough, once the game
starts there are what might be
called some "lighter moments."
Goss and the three others who
make up the Wolverines' de-
fensive front four have dubbed
their little group "The Cats,"
with a friendly competition the
weekly objective.
"It's sort of a race all the
time to see who can get to the
quarterback first," smiles Goss.
"That's our job, to stop the
quarterback, so we talk to each
other on the line and make a
little game out of it."'
The result has been not, only
an impressive set of defensive
statistics, but a general inspir-
ation for the whole team.
Fitzgerald terms it "pride in
their own unit, not competition
with others. They take pride in
their teammates' performances,
too - an intrception, a fine run
by Ron, Dierdorf getting off a
big block."
The possibility of a career in

TOM GOSS

Like most team member,, Goss
has felt a definite change in the
team's collective outlook t h i s
season. It is usually called a
"winning attitude", but its
source is not easily located.
"We've got good leadership,"
explains Goss, "and that means
-a lot. Ronnie (team captain Ron
Johnson) is doing a hell of a
job. Ron is really the leader.
"And there's a better coach-
player relationship. We can
really talk with the coaches. Its
been like this ever since spring
ball, and now everybody feels it.
"We all have a winning atti-
tudep no WA ipv l-lr

ti Daily-Peter Dreyfuss
MICHIGAN'S TOM GOSS (65) hauls down a Navy ballcarrier in the Wolverines' third game at Phil
Seymour (91) comes up to help out. Goss, at 6'2" and 225 pounds, is a senior defensive end and a
key factor in Michigan's tough defense. A physical education major, he rates as a potential All-
America, as evidenced by his 44 individual and 19 assisted tackles. The Michigan coaches rate Tom
high on spirit and appreciate his inspirational leadership on the field, a force whose impetus sparks
the defense to performances reflected in their conference-leading status in opponents 'sering.

We will be in our office to serve you
Monday 9-12 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.

need
self;
makei
But
footba
cal ed

owvv. oweeave the worry- professional football definitely tU i
ing to the coaches. There's not interests Goss, although he Guida
a guy down there who doesn't realizes that it would be rough. "I w
think we can win." "I'm a defensive end now," he says. "
The presence of this aura of says, "and I'm probably too small ing ki
confidence which pervades Fer- to play there as a pro. But I enjoye
ry Field, the, Yost dressing could probably do all right as an exe
UHNRE-EGET ILL SAU NErooms, and the Stadium does not an outside linebacker. What I own r
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is a chance to prove my-
I'm confident I could
it if I had the chance."
Goss sees more than just
11 in his future. A physi-
ucation major, he hopes
eive a Master's degree in
nce and Counseling.
'ant to work with kids," he
I spent last summer help-
4s in a camp, and I really
d it. I would like to set
ample for children of my
race.
s does~not, however, plan
urn to his native Knox-

ville, seeing little difference be-
tween Northern and Southern
cities as far as the plight of the
black children is concerned.
"I like Chicago," he explains,
"and I like Atlanta most out-
side the Midwest. Down deep I
love big city life."
So Goss will carry on his pro-
gram of inspirational guidance
among city children. "I've been
through all that," he smiles. "I
know what those kids have to
face, and I believekIcanhelp
them."

Meanwhile, Michigan's weekly
progress in the national rat-
ings only confirms what Goss
says he has believed all along.
"Why not number one?" he asks.
"I really don't think there's any
team that's better than us."
His only reservation is about
his own attitude. "All we have
to do is keep from getting over-
confident.
"Boy, I'drsure like to see O.J.
try to run against o u r
defense."

4
I

C(K POWER BATTLE:
YAC Meet forced to fold

YORK (R)-The nation's
ndoor track and field com-
, the New York Athletic
eet, went out of business
ay, apparently the victim
black power struggle.
will not have a meet at
n Square Garden this win-
id Ray Lump, NYAC ath-
irector. He declined to
te.
"ew Madison Square Gar-
ene of a riot last Feb. 16
threat of a Negro boycott,
ed that it had been noti-
the NYAC that it was dis-
AIRPORT
IMOUSIN ES
r information call
971-3700
ickets are available
Travel Bureaus or
e Michigan Union
32 Trips /Day

continuing sponsorship of the tra-
ditional event.
The NYAC has been holding in-
door track meets for 100 years and
has never missed a year, despite
war or depression.
One prominent track authority
close to the situation, declining to
be identified, said of the move:
"The explanation is simple-no
one has to be subjected to the
abuse the NYAC had to take last
February."
Leaders of black civil rights
movements urged a Negro boycott
of the NYAC meet last Feb. 16 for
what they alleged was discrimina-
tion against Negroes and Jews.
At the time, Lumpp defended
the policies of the club saying:
"The NYAC always has been gen-
erous and gracious in giving tick-
ets for the meet to under pri-
vileged kids from all kinds of
groups."
H. Rap Brown, a black power
advocate, and Harry Edwards,+

State University in California,
were leaders in the boycott move-
ment, warning black athletes not
to cross the picket line.
"I nor any member of the com-
mittee will be responsible for what
happens;" Edwards said.
The 100th anniversary meet was
staged, however, in the stew $43
million Garden. Nine Negro ath-
letes took part while 600 pickets
clashed outside.
Seven Russian athletes also
withdrew from the meet and the
three U.S. service academies,
through orders' of Alfred Fitt,
an assistant secretary of defense
joined the boycott.
Col. Don Hull, executive direc-
tor of the Amateur Athletic Union,
said he also had been told of the
NYAC's withdrawal from the in-
door program.
"I don't know why, I think
they just want to wash their hands
of it," he said. He added that an
Olympic development program
would be staged on that date,
Feb. 21.
The NYAC held its first indoor
meet 100 years ago in the Em-
pire Skating Rink in midtown
Manhattan. Organizers were Clark
Curtis, James Babcock and Henry
Buermeyer. Curtis was originator
of the spiked shoe and in the first
meet athletes passed the single
pair around to NYAC members,
who swept all. events.
"There also was cycling," an
NYAC spokesman said "And the
athletes came out in Derby hats
and high, stiff collars-they were
real dudes."

p

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Joef

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THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND DEPARTMENT OF ART
Present
PUCCINUS "LA BOHEMF"
(English Translation by Josef Blatt)
NOVEMBER 22-23, 25-26, 8:00 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
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MAIL ORDERS ACCEPTED NOW. Make checks payable to "University of Michigan." Send
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Arbor, Michigan 48104. Box office opens Monday, November 18, 1968, 12:30 to 5:00 P.M.

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