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November 12, 1968 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-12

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Tuesday, November 12, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Tuesday, November 12, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

. Hot

dog.

Michigan

roars

to

4th

in

nation

By The Associated Press
Michigan zipped up three more
spots in the Associated Press na-
tional football poll this week to;
capture fourth place behind only
* Southern California, Ohio State,
and Penn State.
The Wolverines progressed in
the poll due to their 36-0 trounc-
ing of Illinois last Saturday.
With Michigan arch-rival Ohio
State ranked second in the coun-
try and both schools eyeing a bid.
for the Rose Bowl, the clash be-,
tween the Wolverines and the
Buckeyes in two weeks is shaping
up as the Big Ten's, and possibly
the nation's "game of the .year."
The Trojans of Southern Cali-
fornia were runaway winners over
Ohio State after their most im-
pressive showing in fpur games:,
Steve .Sogge's passing and the
running of O. J. Simpson sparked
Southern Cal to an easy 35-17
triumph over California and
earned the defending natipnal
champions 32 first-place votes and
908 points on, the 46 ballots cast
by sports writers and b oadcasters
across the nation.
Ohio State, which trailed by
only 13 points last week, received
14 first-place. votes, same as a
week ago, and 864 points after
crushing Wisconsin 43-8. Southern
Top Twenty
The top 20, with first-place votes,
records and total points. Points award-
ed for first 15 picks on basis of 20-18-
16-14-12-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1:
1. So. California 32 7--0 908
2. Ohio State 14 7-0 864
3. Penn State 1 7-0 744
4. MICHIGAN 7-1 542
5. Georgia 6-0-2 493
6. Missouri 7-1 492
7. Kansas 7-1 492
8. Texas 6--1--1 371
9. Notre Dame 6-2 213
10. Arkansas 7-1 193
11. Tennessee 5-1-1 180
12. Auburn 6-2 172
13. Oregon State 6-2 150
14. Houston 4-1-2 131
15. Purdue 6-2 111.
16. Alabama 6-2 63
17.' Ohio U. 8-0 39
19. California 5-2-1 33
19. Indiana 6-2 30
2Q. Wyoming 6-2 26
Others receiving votes, listed alpha-
betically: Arizona, Arizona State, Army,
HIarvard, Iowa, Michigan State, Minne-
sota, Mississippi, North Texas State,
Oklahoma, Southern Methodist, Syra-
cuse, Texas Tech, Virginia Tech, Yale.
NBA Standings f
Eastern Division

dailly
Sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
FRED LaBOUR
Cal had 19 first-place votes last
week.
Penn State, with a 7-9 record
like the top two teams, moved up
from fourth to third in the wake

of a 22-7 thumping of Miami, Fla.
The Nittany Lions picked up the
other first-place vote.
Kansas, dropped from the un-
beaten ranks 27-23 by Oklahoma,
fell from third to seventh place.
Georgia jumped four places to
No. 5 after mauling Florida 51-0,
and Missouri moved from eighth
to sixth thanks to a 42-7 romp
over Iowa State.
Rounding out the Top Ten were
Texas, Notre Dame and Arkansas,
up two, three and four spots, re-
spectively. The Longhorns ripped
Bayler 47-26, Notre Dame wal-
loped Pitt 56-7 and Arkansas
bombed Rice 46-21.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

What more can you, say about Saturday?

By BILL CUSUMANO
36-0. A spectacular passing per-c
formance by Dennis Brown. Twot
more touchdowns by Ron John-1
son. Pretty good, huh?a
It's not bad at all to tell thet
truth. But the amazing thingt
about Michigan's smashing ofr
Illinois last Saturday was that
they really didn't play anywhere1
near their top level.
While the defense was notching
its second shutout in as many
weeks, the offense had what might
have been its most inefficient
game since the season's opener.
Numerous scoring opportunities
were missed as four fumbles were
lost (the first ones lost this year),
a touchdown was called back be-
cause of a clip and one sure pass
for six- points was dropped.
Yet the Wolverine offensive
squad still managed to produce
five touchdowns and a field goal,
and that ain't a bad day's work.
Still the fact must be faced that
it wasn't a great day.
When one considers this and
then looks again at the final court,
the question has to come as to
just how good Michigan really is.
The answer would seem to be
that they're real good, maybe the
best in the Big Ten. Illinois coach
Jim Valek called the defense the
best his team has faced since
Notre Dame.
The Wolverine defense leas be-
come known for its ability to
force mistakes and Saturday prov-
ed their reputation. Six times
Illinois fumbled and five times
blue shirts came up with the ball.
When the Illini decided to go to
the airways the results were not
much better. Bob Naponic com-
pleted only five passes to his team-
mates, while two other tosses
found their way into Michigan
hands.
The defense has given up only
12 points per game, but their great
value has been in the many times
they have given the ball over to
the offense in good field posi
ion.
_________ -I__

In Saturday's contest Illinois enc2 between the two clubs Sa-
constantly had pressure applied to turday. Illinois outside of their
them because of Michigan's excel- lack of talent, just does not have
lent positioning, Dennis Brown the killer instinct of Michigan.
and his crew took advantage of The omen of this came early in
these opportunities enough to blow ,he contest when Ron Johnson,
the game open early and' go on to fumbled on Michigan's first series
rout the outmanned Illini. of downs.
The ability to capitalize on the The Illini recovered on their
breaks was really the true differ- own 47 and were in excallent posi-

tion for a scoring drive. But two
plays later Naponic promptly
fumbled the ball right back to the
Wolverines and the handwriting
was on the proverbial wall.,
Bump Elliott's team has not
made many ball handling mistakes
this year, and when Illinois was
not able to use the breaks they
received their fate was sealed.
Sooner or later the Michigan at-
tack was bound to come u with its
usual explosion and bury the Illini.
In less than a quarter the Wol-
verines had opened up a 20-0 lead
and the game should have been
ended there. Maybe they should
put a rule in football that allows
the referee to declare a technical
knockout. It would have saved all
concerned the trouble of the
second half Saturday.
The game actually took' on a
pattern. It was just to be ex-
pected that Illinois would fumble
or throw a.n interception. Once,
whenthe Ilini had a fourth and
inches, some wit in the press box
commented that there was no need
to worry, Illinois would probably

fumble the snapback. Sure
enough, they did.
And that's the way it was Sa-
turday; it was a game of mis-
takes. The difference was t h a t
Michigan used the errors to their
own advantage and Illinois didn't.
Some may say that this really
doesn't prove anything when the
competition is as bad as Illinois.
But such opportunism is what
really separates a good team from
1 a bad team. It must be remember-
ed that the Illini did score 24
points against Ohio State and had
225 yards rushing Saturday.
Michigan fans probably saw Illi-
nois at their best, yet the Illini
could not score.
The conclusion must be then
that what was seen Saturday was
a display of powerful football. One
can only shudder when the real-
ization comes that Michigan could
have done even better. Undoubted-
ly the thought has already oc-
curred to John Coatta and Woody
Hayes.

i

- I

Gridde Pickinifgs
The guy who won Gridde Pickings this week is from Bay City,
Michigan, but we'll give him his pizza anyway.
He also claims his name is Edward Hodges, which personally
I don't believe for a minute.
At any rate, you ought to enter this week. Get your entry into
this joint by Friday at midnight and gi'e us a chance not to'believe

who you are either.
1. Wisconsin at MICHIGAN

-Daily-Eric Pergeaux
LANCE SCHEFFLER (45) lugs the old pigskin towards the
Suckers' end zone last Saturday. In case you didn't notice, Michi-
gan is now ranked behind only three other teams in the country.

-Daily-Andy Sacks
BURLY JIM MANDICH (88) hops around a little bit while
hauling in one of his seven passes against Illinois. Mandich's
sticky fingers are part of the reason for the Wolverine's startling
success on the gridiron this year.

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

(pick score)
Northwestern at Illinois
Minnesota at Indiana
Ohio State at Iowa
Purdue at Michigan State
Navy at Syracuse
Princeton at Yale
Georgia at Auburn
Mississippi at Tennessee
Missouri at Oklahoma
SMU vs. Arkansas

12. Texas Tech at Baylor
13. Oregon at California
14. Oregon Stte at Southern Cal.
15. UCLA at Washington
16. Dartmouth at Cornell
17. Ohio University at Cincinnati
18. Florida at Kentucky
19. Nebraska at Colorado
20. University of Southwest
Louisiana
at University of Northwest
Louisiana

rroiession:al aianuings

I

* Cincinnati
Baltimore
Boston
Detroit
Philadelphia
New York
Milwaukee

W
8
10
7
6
4
2

L
2
3
3
5
4
10
8

Pct. <GB
.800 2
.769
.700 1/
.545 3
.500 3%
.333 6
.200 6/

, WesternDivision

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Los Angeles
Atlanta;
San Diego
Phoenix
San Francisco
Chicago
Seattle

9
6
5
5
5
5
4

4
6
5
5
7
9
10

.692
.500
.500
.500
.417
.357
.286

2
2%
2%
3/
4
5

Minnesota
Chicago
Green Bay
DETROIT
Baltimore,
Los Angele
San Fianc
Atlanta
Cleveland
St. Louis
New Orlea
Pittsburgh
Dallas
New York
Washingto
Philadelph

Coastal Division
8 1 0 .8892
es 8 1 0 .8891
isco 4 5 0 .4441
1 8 0 .111
Eastern Conference
Century Division,
6 3 0 .6672
5 3 1 .6252
ins 3 6 0 .3331
2 6 1 .2501

266 108
197 111
177 204
123 27'
217 17
23$ 20
161 21
161 235

y

Central Division
W L T Pct. Pts. OP
5 4 0 .556 203 147
5 4 0. .556 167 222
3 5 1 .375 174 143
3 5 1 .375 154 175

Sunday's Games
DETROIT at Minnesota
-Atlanta at Chicago
Cleveland at Pittsburgh
Dallas at Washington
Los Angeles at San Francisco
New Orleans vs. Green Bay at
Milwaukee
Philadelphia at New York
St. Louis at Baltimore
Eastern Division
W L T Pct. Pts. OP
New York 7 2 0 .778 257 184
Houston 4 6 0 .400 175 184
Miami 3 5 1 .375 159 234
Boston 3 6 0 .333 145 244
Buffalo 1 8 1 .111 145 264
Western Division

8
1
0
7
F
3

Sunday's Results
Los Angeles 130, New York 109
Phoenix 130,Detroit 128, overtime.
Only games scheduled.
Yesterday's Games
Seattle vs. Philadelphia at Boston
San Diego at Boston
Only games scheduled.
Today's Games'
Seattle at Milwaukee
San Diego at Chicago
Atlanta at San Francisco
Cincinnati at Baltimore
Only games scheduled.

on
hi

Capitol Division
7 2 0 .778 268 122
6 3 0 .667 225 19'
4 5 0 .444 163 23
a 0 9 0 .000 125 25

Sunday's Results
Baltimore 27, DETROIT 10
Minnesota 14, Green Bay 10
Los Angeles 17, Atlanta 10
Cleveland 35, New Orleans 17
New York 27, Dallas 21
Pittsburgh 28, St. Louis 28, tie
Chicago 27, San Francisco 19
Washington 16, Philadelphia 10

2 Kansas City 8 2 0 .800 246
5 Oakland 7 2 0 .778 296
San Diego 7 2 0 .778 269.
2 Denver 4 5 0 .444 147
Cincinnati 2, 8 0 .200 149
14 i n Sunday's Results
'6 New York 26, Houston 7
Kansas City 16, Cincinnati 9
Miami 21, Buffalo 17
Oakland 43, Denver 7
San Diego 27, Boston 17
Sunday's Games
Boston at Kansas City
Cincinnati at Miami
Denver at Houston
New York at Oakland
San Diego at Buffalo

133
137
170
224
214

fill

I_'_ _ __________ il

;'
;,
i
'

,.

The Ann Arbor YM-YWCA

I

JUDO

CLUB

is presenting a demonstration
of men's, women's and youth
judo, on
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15
8:00 P.M.

UW

- ._____

JJ
'1
,
'

UNION-LEAGUE THERE IS.STILL SPACE UN ION-LEAGUE
EUROPEAN CHARTER FLIGHTS
FLIGHT 1 May 4 DETROIT-LONDON Sabena
June 1 BRUSSELS-DETROIT
FLIGHT 2 May 8 NEW YORK-LONDON Sabena
Aug. 17 BRUSSELS-NEWYORK
FLIGHT 3 June 29 NEWYORK-LONDON Pan Am
Aug. 14 PARIS-NEW YORK
Only flights backed financially by the University
Oniv I AT A r'hrter toE Froethis cmmer

Is Bell
Depends on how you look at it. We aren't blowing grass in
the rack room and wearing beads, if that's what you mean.
In fact we sit at desks and wear neckties a lot. Q But
if you think that makes Ma Bell a stuffy old broad
with a passion for the status quo, you aren't with
it. Stuffy old broads don't' put up communica-
tions satellities. They don't get to be leaders
.1 . - - - -. - A a

s

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