100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 10, 1968 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sunday, November 10, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine
t

Former Suckers shut out

(Continued from page 1 I penetrations into Michigan terri-
quarter; pick up steam in the sec- tory 'during the first half, gave
ond period with two more scores; them only half a dozen plays be-
a n d maintain the momentum fore forcing a punt. The offense
throughout the second h a 1 f -- then took over on the Michigan 21.:
much like t he proverbial steam Only five plays later came
engine. Brown's bomb to Harris, as the
The first score came on a four- fleet end got behind his defender_
yard Johnson plunge following a and outran him to the goal line.
64-yard Wolverine drive. Only Brown got the PAT this time, on'
eight plays were needed, including I a seven-yard run (following a'
a key interference call which gave
Michigan a first down on the Il-
linois 22. Killian's conversion at-
tempt was wide left, and the Wol- Big Ten Standings

five-yard penalty), and the Wol-
verines had 20.
The second half started off with
an exchange of punts-hardly an
offensive showing. Yet the Wol-
verines were able to capitalize on
them, especially since the second
- a Mark Werner boomer -
bounced right off the Illini re-
ceiver's chest right into Dan Dier-
dorf's waiting arms at the 21 of
Illinois.
Three passes later the score
m ain. The first was inecmplete.

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR'
FRED LaBOUR

i
A
.1
1

verines had a 6-0 lead.
Johnson also gained the second
Michigan TD, capping a 74-yard
drive with a two-yard run. In ad-
dition, the tailback figured here
in probably the most exciting play
of the game, grabbing a swing pass
from Brown behind the line and
twisting and powering his way
for 31 yards, with the whole team
downfield throwing blocks. Brown
fumbled the PAT attempt follow-
ing the touchdown, but Michigan
had a 12-0 lead.
Four minutes later the score-
board operator was busy again.
The Wolverine defense, which al-
lowed the Illini only two minor

MICHIGAN
Ohio State
Indiana
Iowa
Minnesota
Purdue
Michigan State
Northwestern
Illinois
Wisconsin

W
5
5
4
3
3
3
1
1
0
0

L
0
0
1
2
2
2
4
4
5
5

Pct.
1.000
1.000
.800
.600
.600
.600
.200
.200
.000
.000

g4 41. 11 Z it 11~ljliC
the second was made good via in-' The very next play after the
teference - admd the third was kickoff was a Bob Naponic-to-
Brown's strike to Staroba. The Doug Redmann pass, one of the
PAT pass was intercepted, but Illini quarterback's few comple-
now it was 26-0: tions of the day. But the receiver
promptly fumbled the ball, George
Hoey fell on it at the 27, and the
offense was back out. Four plays
netted good yardage, but Killian
came in on a fourth down to boot
his field goal. The score: 29-0.
That was the last time the first
team scored, yet Elliott elected to
leave them in till midway through
the last period. Aterwards he
explained his reasoning.
I} . . r

-Daily-Andy Sacks
DENNIS BROWN (22) scoots along the sideline

-Daily-Andy Sacks
SUPERLATIVE RON JOHNSON (40) evades Illinois' John Mauzey

Sports Beat Sports Beat Sports Beat
By David We ir
4Hedcefumbles, and
the seventh straight
The first time he carried the ball in the fourth quarter, he did it.
Ron "Flipper" Johnson, Michigan's All-American calibre half-
back, took a pitchout around right end for three yards.
With that, he went over the 2000 yards-gained plateau to become
the second plgyer in Wolverine history to do so. Johnson has now
lugged the ball a record 435 times for 2002 yards - only 132 short of
Tom Harmon's all-time mark of 2134.
Breaking into the select "2000-gained" circle didn't alter the
game statistics, however, as Johnson suffered through his worst
game of the season - 19 carries for 51 yards - against a deter-
mined front-wall defensive unit from Illinois.
On his initial carry from scrimmage in the first quarter, Johnson
was hit hard and fumbled. "I was hit in the head," the Michigan
captain explained after the game., "I never really recovered for the
rest of the game - it continued to bother me.
"Everyone seemed to be moving in slow motion, like a dream,"
he said.
Johnson's fumble was the first lost by Michigan this season, The
Wolverines had played 421'minutes and 10 seconds of game-time
without losing the ball on a bobble. Yesterday they lost it that way)
four times.
"We were dropping the ball a lot because of the wetness,"
quarterback Dennis Brown said -in the post-game locker room.
"Our receivers had trouble holding onto some of the passes, and
we lost the ball once on a hike."
"On the first two-point conversion attempt in the second quarter,
I never even saw the ball-it never got to me. The rest of the fum-
bles came when the ball carrier was hit."
Brown hit on 13 of 27 passes in the game to close in on Dick
Vidmer's all-time aerial records for Michigan. Hie now has a career
total of 174 completions in 351 attempts . . only 13 and 31 respec-
tively from Vidmer's marks.
Safety Tom Curtis pre-empted the other 'Wolverine pace-setters
yesterday, however, as he broke the all-time Big Ten record for in-
terceptions in one ,season.
Curtis snagged one of Illini quarterback Bob Naponic's fourtli-
quarter passes for his eighth pickoff in five, conference games this
year. The interception stopped the only teal scoring threat Illinois had
all afternoon.
Brown threw two touchdown passes to increase his season total
to 12; and Johnson, the Big Ten scoring leader going into the game,
added two more TDs for a 50-point total in the five games (he's scored
74 overall). Only Tom Harmon has racked up more touchdowns in one
season.
When asked to compare this year's team to his 1964 Rose
Bowl squad, Head Coach Bump Elliott said that "the '64 team
was much more dominating, while this year's club comes up with
the 'Big Play' a lot of times.
"Defensively, we're up to the '64 standard - we've improved rap-
idly this season. Offensively, we've been able to strike fast and con-
sistently in the last seven games," he noted.
The Wolverines have scored 229 points to 96 for their opponents
so far. They need only eight more points 4n the last two games to be-
come the highest-scoring Michigan team in twenty years.
Yesterday's victory' was remarkably similar to last week's over
Northwestern. Michigan started out slowly, but took advantage of a
few breaks for the 'Big Play' to build up an insurmountable lead at
halftime, 20-0. The Illini were out of the contest before they knew
what had happened.
Spirit ran high, as usual, in the Wolverine locker room. And as
g happy as anybody was Johnson. "We're gonna win three more games,"
he yelled. "Two now and one later."

Yesterday's Results
MICHIGAN 36, Illinois 0
Ohio State 43, Wisconsin 8
Indiana 24, Michigan State 22
Iowa 68, Northwestern 34
Minnesota 27, Purdue 13

I_

SCORES

The Run for the Roses

MI

FIRST DOWNS

Rushing
Passing
Penalty
TOTAL NO. OF RUSHES
NET YARDS - Rushing 1
Passing2
FORWARD PASSESl
ATTEMPTED
Completed'
Intercepted by
Yards interceptions
returned
TOTAL PLAYS
(Rushes and Passes)
PUNTS, Number
Average distance 1
KICKOFFS, returned by
YARDS KICKS RETURNED
Punts
Kickoffs
FUMBLES, Number
Ball lost by
PENALTIES, Number
Yards penalized
MICHIGAN 6 14
ILLINOIS 0 0

ICH. ILL.
23 15
12 14
9 1
2 0
47 62
154 225
242 35
31 16
15 5
2 0

Moorhead
Total
Mandich
Harris
Johnson
Staroba
Imsland
Hankwitz
Betts

Is

4 2 0 16
31 15 0 242

Pass Receiving

No. Yards
7 84
1 69
2 40
2 25
1 8
1 6
1 10
Totals 15 242

Ave.
12.0
69.0
20.0
12.5
8.0
6.0
10.0

22
78
6
35.7
34
15

33

78
5 Werner
.6

Punting
Number Yards Average
6 143 35.7

7
137
4I

4' 6 Rich
4 5 Naponi
7 5 Kmiec
75 62 Bess
Raddal
9 7-36 Vargo
0 0 0- 0 Burns

Johnsoi
Li
t~z

ILLINOIS
Rushing
Tries
n 27
17
4
4
5
4
Totals 62
Passing
Att. Comp.
16, 5
Pass Receiving
No.

"Illinois has a history, of being
awfully tough in the second half,"
the Wolverine mentor declared.
"We wanted to keep our number
one offense in till we felt it was
all right, in order to rule out the
possibility of them picking up
momentum like they did against
Ohio State." (Against the Buck-
eyes, Illinois had rallied from a
24-0 deficit to tie the Big Ten
co-leaders at one point in the
second half.)
This second half threat never
materialzed. The only really sus-
tained Illini drive came at the end
of the third quarter and continued
through the first part of the last
period, ask Illinois took over at
their own 15 and Naponic and
Rich Johnson went to work.
Twelve plays later the ball rest-
ed on the Michigan 15, and a
score seemed imminent. But Tom
Curtis came up with his eighth Big
Ten interception-a record-and
that was that.
SALE! CHEAP!
! Junior sizes 7 and 9
Dresses $10, Skirts $5, Slacks $5,
Sweaters $5. HARDLY WORN!I
Sun., Nov. 10, 12-6 P.M.,
721 South Forest, No 309
NO CHECKS!

GRIDDE PICKINGS
MICHIGAN 36, Illinois 0
Indiana 24, Miiigan State 22
Minnesota 27, Prdue 13,
Iowa 68, Northwestern 34
Ohio State 43, Wisconsin 8
Army 58, Boston College 25
Penn State 22, Miami (Fla.) 7
Alabama 16, LSU 7
NC State 17, Duke 15
Georgia 51, Florida 0
SMU 36, Texas A&M 23
Stanford 35, Washington 20
USC 35, California 17
Oregon State 45, UCLA 21
South Carolina 34, Wake Forest 21
Oklahoma 27, Kansas 23
Navy 35, Georgia Tech 15
Harvard 9, Princeton 7
Cincinnati 37, Louisville 7
Austin Peay 56, Murray State 0
THE EXAM SECRET

MICHIGAN

Net Ave.
121 4.5
32 1.9
94 6.0
is 4.51
1i 3.6
15 3.7
-3 -3.0
225
Int. Yards
2 35
Yards Ave.
15 15.0
14 7.0
4 4.0
2 2.0I
35

Missouri 42, Iowa State 7
Notre Dame 56, Pittsburgh 7
Ohio U. 28, Bowling Green 27
Oklahoma State 34, Colorado 17
Arkansas 46, Rice 21
Texas Tech 31, Texas Christian 14
Oregon 27, Washington State 13
Oregon State 45, UCLA 21
VMI 21, Davidson 17
Arizona 14, Air Force 10
Utah State 34, Brigham Young 7
Dartmouth 31, Columbia 19
Kansas State 12, Nebraska 0
Texas 47, Baylor 26
Muskinggum 31, Heidelberg 0
Montana State 41, North Dakota 7
Bemidji 37, St. Thomas 0
Ricks 19, Snow 14
Fort Lewis 20, Westminster 19
Pacific Lutheran 39, Whitman 17
Lane 20, Fisk 7

SUCCESSFUL
TECHNIQUES
FOR
PASSING
EXAMS

I

I

I

I

V

Johnson
Brown
Craw
Moorhead
Scheffier
sipp
Beruttl

Rushing
Tries
19
13
3
6
2
Totals 47

JUMBOY

Net Ave. Naponic
51 2.6
45 3.5J
2 0.7
24 8.0 Raddatz
24 4.3 Redmann
6 3.0 Kmiec
0 0.0 Johnson
154
Int. Yards
0 226 Bareither

D. BROWN, passer
LET US STYLE YOUR
HAIR TO FIT YOUR
PERSONALITY

Y

1
2
1
Totals 5

" 8 BARBERS
* No Waiting
The Dascola
Near Michigan

NOW-You can shine in Exami-
nations and Life! Don't fail exams
through ignorance of tehnique!
"The Exam Secret" gives you ex-
perience, knowledge needed to
make good. It includes: magical
lessons; essay is the key; year's
master-plan, etc. Complete. 128
pages. Only $1 ppd. Money-back
guarantee.
EVERSOLE CO., BOX 10231
Phoenix, Arizona 85016

M-M-m-m-m, yummie!
A giant hamburger of ilb. U.S.
Govt. pure beef topped with let-
tuce, tomato, mayonnaise, onions,
pickles and ketchup'.
ALL THIS FOR'ONLY
49c
L MNG PEEDY ERVICE
West of Arborlond

rassi i mp
Att. Comp.
27 13

Punting
Number Yards Average
5 168 33.6,

Barbers
Theatre

Browne

U- .

""""...

ADVE.RT
i .} r{rShouldKn
e r
wrra.
i ~

Is
owv

ERS
rWhat ,''
~ z~ 2

A RECORD SPECTACULAR!!,
AT
discountrecords, inc.
3oo S. State St.
10 MAJOR LABELS
AT AMAZING SAVINGS
-ONE DAY ONLY-
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10th

TUESDAY'S DEADLINE
has been changed
MONDAY 12 NOON
Office hours Monday 9-12, 1-4

11 A.M.

to 5 P.M.

DON'T FORGET!r

_ _ _ _ _ _ _---

ii _. _. .:

FOCUS

ON

LATIN

AMERICA

CONSIDER A

Monsignor IYAN ILLICH Speaking On the Seamy Side of Crarity: some statements about American
Missionary work in Latin America.

TUESDAY, NOV. 12
noon - International Center Luncheon
"Social Change in Latin America Today"
8:00 p.m. - Rackham Auditorium
"The Danger of the School System as a Belief System:
The Need to Demythologize Education." Introduction
by Prof. Mathew Trippe, Special Ed., School of Educa-
tion.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 13
noon - Canterbury House, 331 Maynard St.
"Peasants in Latin American Church & Society." Dis-
cussion with Prof. Eric Wolf, Anthropology.
8:00 p.m. - St. Andrew's Episc. Church, 306 N. Divis-
ion. "Christianity & Communism: Coexistence or Con-
flict." Discussion with Prof. Albert Meyer, Polit. Sci.

Men and money sent with missionary motivation carry a foreign Chris-
tian image, a foreign pastoral approach and a foreign political message.
They also bear the mark of North American capitalism of the 1950's. Why
not, for once, consider the shady side of charity; weigh the inevitable burdens
foreign help imposes on the South American Church; taste the bitterness
of the damage done by our sacrifices?
Superficial emotional involvement obscures rational thinking about
American international "assistance." Healthy guilt feelings are repressed
by a strangely motivated desire to "help" in Vietnam. Finally, our generation
begins to cut through the rhetoric of patriotic "loyalty." We stumblingly
recognize the perversity of our power politics and the destructive direction
of our warped efforts to impose unilaterally "our way of life" on all. We have
not yet begun to face the seamy side of clerical manpower involvement and
the Church's complicity in stifling universal awakening too revolutionary
to lie quietly within the "Great Society."
Groups of U.S. missioners cannot avoid projecting the image of "U.S.
outposts." The U.S. missioner of necessity is an "undercover" agent-albeit
unconscious-for U.S. Social and political consensus. But, consciously and
purposely, he wishes to bring the values of his Church to South America;
adaptation and selection seldom reach the level of questioning the values
themselves.
Latin America can no longer tolerate being a haven for U.S. liberals

CIVILIAN
AIR FORCE CAREER
with the
AIR FORCE LOGISTICS COMMAND
at
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base
near
Dayton, Ohio

There are excellent opportunities in
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
(All engineering degrees considered)
for those interested in the Air Force Logistics Command Staff Positions. The Industrial Engi-
neer applies his skill in the areas of management systems, design, significant problem solving
using his knowledge of the mathematical and physical sciences together with methods and
principles of engineering analysis and design. He is a consultant to management in the
application of proven management techniques to increase the effectiveness, efficiency, and
economy of Air Force operations. He also administers and operates in methods improvement
and processing engineering. He receives on-the-lob training in all the foregoing' areas and
within a minimum of training time. The Industrial Engineer is given specific assignments
relating to the above areas of activity pertaining to the particular organization to which he is
assigned. Throughout his career, he continpes to be given increased responsibility commen-
surate with his ability.

I,

I

i

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan