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November 09, 1968 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-09

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, November 9, 1 968

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,,

Cai

THE WALK
STORE-WIDE SALE
109 S. 4th
Ph. 769-01 13
PRICES REDUCED 30%
featuring imported gifts, clothing

vs.

By JIM FORRESTER
Hello out there sports fans,
pigskin pundits and other fools
who have lost their pants so far
this fall betting on the outcomes
of football contests all over the
country.
In our far ranging search to
bring wonder and delight to our
readers we have come up with the
following accurate analyses of
these assorted conflicts of the
earth-shattering type.
On tap this weekend besides
dr aug h t (or' draft-chuckle,
chuckle, chuckle) is the tilt be-
tween cross-state rivals (up-down-
state rivals?) California and
Southern California. The result
will most likely decide 'the Pacific-
Eight representative to the Rose
Bowl.
The game will be played in Los
Angeles, but in this game of games
who is at home should make little
difference. What will decide the

Attention Fraternities
FORMING BOWLING LEAGUE
5 man teams for Tuesday nights
Sign up at Michigan Union Bowling Lanes,
see George

USCIS
game is how hungry the Golden
Bears really are. They have not:
been to a Rose Bowl since 1959
and even that was not a very good
year as the boys from Berkeley
turned pseudo-intellectualism into
pseudo-football and got clobbered
by Iowa, 38-12.
Southern Cal has an attack
which features O. J. Simpson, O.
J. Simpson and more 0. J. Simp-
son. The big back averages 36 car-
ries every outing and about the
only time the Trojans get into
trouble is when they do not give
the ball to O. J. Simpson.
The Cal attack is morel varied
as quarterback Randy Humphries
is featured handing the ball off
to backs Gary Fowler, Bob Darby,
and John McGaffie.
The Cal attack, however, has
not featured many points against
tougher opponents, scoring only
ten, seven and seven points against
Colorado, Army and Washington
respectively. But the defense has
been stingy, giving up only 5.6
points per game to lead the na-
tion.
Cal's defensive line is their bread
and butter. Mike McCaffrey and
Irby Augustine anchor the, ends
and, middle guard Ed White is
having an unexpectedly great
year. Backed up by Dennis Pitta,
this crew has ability to put the
crunch to thefabulous 0. J. Simp-
son and put the Bears into that
game of games.
With Louisiana State losing
last week too 'Ole Miss, Tennessee
has a great chance to put itself
into the Southeastern Conference
lead with a victory against Auburn
this Saturday. Seeing as how Au-
burn has the habit of becoming
hapless Auburn in the clutch, the
Vols should win by a touchdown
or three.

Trojan horse

py , t
" ---

h e T .

-F--

uck/in'
Q!tI'A
- Bob Lees ...

-Daily-Andy Sacks
CALIFORNIA'S DENNIS PITTA (56) and another Golden Bear
bring down a Michigan ball carrier in Cal's opening-game victory
over the Wolverines. The though California defense meets a tough
test today as they oppose Southern Cal and O. J. Simpson at
Los Angeles.

Tennessee has a fine passing
game with Bubba Wyche tossing
to flanker Lester McClain. But the'
rushing attack is making the Vols
tough this year. Fullback Dick
Picken runs over people and Rich-
mond Flowers run past them.
Auburn's offense is limited to
the passing game with Loran Car-
ter throwing to split end Tim
Christian along with anyone else

Davis Cup inter-zone draw
favors U.S. team over India

on the team that is allowed to
catch a pass.
But the Tennessee defense will
tell the story. Linebackers Steve
Kiner and Jack Reynolds can put
on the big pass rush and defensive
back Jim Weatherford will be
there to snatch any hurried pass-
es. Auburn's Tigers are not those
of a more temperate climate.
Kansas plays another biggie,
this week with Oklahoma. The un-.
beaten Jayhawkers rush for 318.7
yards every time they play and
score more points than anyone
else in the nation with a 42 6 per
game average.
The Sooners, however, are
really tough but have had their
problems in dropping three games
thus far in the campaign. 'They
would like nothing better than to
knock Kansas from the ranks of
the unbeaten. There could be an
upset, but smart betting men are
putting their money on the Jay-
hawkers to the tune of at least
one touchdown.
Two other tilts on today's
schedule rank in the fabled class
of barn-burner. Louisiana State
and Alabama like to kill and es-
pecially each other. Defense is the
key and the contest could end in

SAN JUAN, P.R. UP) - Arthur
Ashe, the U.S. ace, will m e et
India's Premjit Lall in the first
I n dia's match, today in the
opening of the Davis Cup inter-
zone finals at the Caribe Hilton
Hotel tennis courts.
In the second singles, C 1 a r k
I araebner will face India's veteran
Ramanathan Krishman.
The draw was held Friday at a
luncheon attended by Robert Ma-
laga, executive secretary of the1
U.S.Lawn Tennis Association, and+
under the supervision of official,
referee Charlie Hare.
The draw favored the United
States. The Indians had hoped to
pit Krishnan, 31, against the 25-;
year-old Ashe of Richmond, Va.,a
in the opening singles.
Krishnan,' at his best, is capa-1
ble of beating anyone. The Indians
__.-___I

felt that if he could topple t h e
leading American, they might have
a chance for an upset.
The Indians are at their best
on slow courts while the Ameri-
cans favor fast courts.
"The cqurts here are very fast,"
said Luis Ayala, the Chilean pro
who has been coaching the In-
dians. "It will be an uphill battle
for our players."
Lall, 27, also doesn't figure to
beat the 25-year-old Graebner, an
Ohioan wo now makes his home
in New York City.

Thursday, Thursday
It being a typical Thursday night last Thursday night, I got
drunk.
(There's something inherently reassuring about having a regu-
lar drinking night. It sort of puts the whole week in perspective.)
The modus operandi of last Thursday night followed a by-now-
hallowed pattern. My roommate Bob, often known, along with me,
as the .co-biographer of that noted personality Doc Ohms, Joined me
at the UGLI for a few hours of heavy booking. (This, after all, being
the University of Michigan, such matters as studying may not be
dispensed with lightly.)
At approximately quarter to eleven, we both glanced up from our
respective texts, nodded slightly, closed our tomes, and marched res-
olutely out the door - to the Bell.
(The Bell, you may ask? Well, why not? A good beer is a good
beer, and a good beer in loud company is infinitely better than a beer
in solitude - unless, of course, you really want to get PLASTERED.)
We reached the doors of the Bell at 11 p.m., in expectation of
greeting our third partner in the normal Thursday night endeavors.
And we were not disappointed, as a friendly hail from Diamond Hank,
who has been described in many ways by many people in many cir-
cumstances, but whom we now refer to as the one who died for our
sins, graced our ears as we entered the portals. He beckoned us to a
nearby table, and there introduced us to our surprise for this week -
Georgy.
Thanks to a movie bearing that title, the name Georgy bears
certain connotations - but few of them applied to the petite, long
blond-haired, bright-eyed, warm person who graced our table last
night. Yet what really endeared her to us, even more than the
many graces she displayed, was a talent she possessed which few
females can claim: she really liked beer.
So we sat there, imbibing freely, discussing the world situation
in general and a few incidents in our lives in particular, for an hour
or so. Then we got up to leave, pausing at the door to sing a few bars
of "The Marseillaise" with several patrons. The next stop was Hank's
place, where there was cold Budweiser in the refrigerator - as well
as another surprise companian: Petronius the Arbiter, a somewhat
spirited cat named for a similar feline in Robert Heinlein's Immortal
Door into Summer. Pete was a little sleepy, though, and Georgy was
getting that way, so we decided to be chivalrous and walk her back -
or at least to do a reasonable approximation of walking.
Stopping only once along the way - at the UGLI for a call
of nature -we made it to her apartment building in near-record
time, singing all the way, (Once before we assayed a similar route,
only to take about three hours. It was terrible.) There in recogni-
tion of our gracious deeds, the three of us young gentlemen were
knighted by the fair lady - and I, who asked for a favor, receiv-
ed a wondrous leaf to be worn at my helm.
Being then in the neighborhood of many of our closest acquan- 1
tances, we decided to pay a few respects before returning to our abodes
for the evening. We bounced down a few buildings, glided up some
steps; rang a doorbell, and stepped into the waiting paws of Oar-
funkle, a slightly hyper-active young female dog. Once past her, we
discovered the four young ladies, who therein resided, busy at a game
of bridge - and partially stoned.
It was an idyllic situation - but we were tired, they were tired, $
and Garfunkle was rabid. We stayed a bit, ate a bit, and departed.
Once we hit the crisp outdoor air, however, a new energy sparked
us on. The Residential College sign caught our attention - as it had
one month before - and we entered - as we had one month before.
Our path led us to the main lounge - as it had one month before -
and there we stood, taking it all in, recognizing faces dimly from the
past. Suddenly whom should we spot but Miss Kate - the very same
young damsel who four weeks ago had listened to our ambling talk
in the very same spot.
But here came our downfall. "We're high again," we an-
nounced cheerfully.
"On grass or liquor?" she queried.
"BEER," we sang out.,
"BEER!" she exclaimed hideously, and departed.
Well, that did it. We've always treasured beer, and still do,
We've always thought that all forms of high were good in their
proper place. But suddenly here came someone implying that
there is a kind of hierarchy to high, that some forms are better
than others, that a beer-high is for peons while grass was the only
REAJL stuff.
We were crushed. Home we went, sadly pondering over the vag-
aries of the world.
But this Thursday is another day.
Put Your Car On A Dirt-Free Diet
You know it's clean because you do it youself
Wash, Rinse and Wax!1
5 Minutes - 25c u'e
LIBERTYC a
CAR, WASH a ,

in uie uaay, LiL.o i ascorelss tie, the moral winner
is expected to play Stan Smith being the team with the least men
and Bob Lutz of ; Los Angelescbedg themie h am
against Krishnan and Jaidip Mu- carried off the field.
kerjea. The other clash of note pits
On Monday, Graebner will op- powerful (and just a bit lucky)
pose Lall and Ashe will face Penn State against the Hurricanes
Krishnan. from Miami Florida. Miami was
The winner will earn the right a top ten pick at the beginning
to meet' Australia's Cup holders of the season but 'has been dis-
in the Challenge Round at Adel- appointing. The Hurricanes will
aide, Australia, Dec. 26-28. want to take advantage of this
The Americans haven't played final chance to redeem themselves
in the Challenge Round since against an elite team but the Nit-
1964. They haven't been to Aus- tany Lions will prove lucky again
tralia for Cup play since 1963 and eke out their seventh straight
when they last captured the Cup. win.

WORSHIP

1

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Southern Baptist Convention
1131 Church St.
761-0441
Rev. Tom Bloxam
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School
11 :00 a.m.,-Morning Worship
6:30 p.m.-Training Union
7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH;
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Terry N. Smith, Minister
Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
Services ate 9:15 and 11:00 a.m.--Sermon
Topic: "Tips on the Stock Market." Rev.
Terry Smith preaching.

CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Donald Postema, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday dt 9:30 & 11:00: Services, The Rev.
Donald Mossman, Guest' Preacher (Commu-
nion at 11:00),
Sunday at 9:30: Bible Class
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta Supper-Program.
Wednesday at 10:00 P.M.: Mid-week evo-
tion.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Phone 662-4466
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church
Guest preacher, The Rev. Bryant George of
New York.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 East Huron
Phone 662-3153
Minister: Calvin S. Malefyt
10:30 a.m.-"Strong Faith and Shoulders."
Speaker Calvin Malefyt, minister.
7:00 p.m. - "Parent-Child Relationships."
Speaker Richard Peterson, M.S.W.
FII ST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Dr. Erwin A. Goede, Minister
Phyllis St. Louis, Minister of Education'
Sermon-"This Liberal Congregation."
Student Religious Liberals meeting 7:00 p.m.
"Conscience & Conscientious' Objection."
Prof. Carl Cohen.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
I 0 An m -Arc rv rice.Su Cay choo, lknl

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH and WESLEY
FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Church-662-4536
Wesley-668-6881
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. The Reverend James
Lawson, Jr, as Henry Martin Loud Lecturer
preaching. "The Only Question that Counts.'
6:00 p.m. Fellowship Supper, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m. Loud Lecture, Wesley Lounge. The
ReverendLawson speaking on "Black Pow-
er in Christian Perspective."
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
7:30 a.m.-Breakfast, Pine Room. Out in time
for 8:00 a.m. classes.
THURSDAY
12.00 noon-Luncheon and Discussion, Pine
Room. "A Church for the 20th Century."
Out in time for 1:00 classes.
FRIDAY
6:00 p.m. Wesley Grads and Young Marrieds
Dinner.
7:00 p.m. Hayride.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division.
8.00 a.m.-Holy Communion
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon'
11:00 a.m._.-Morning Prayer and Sermon
7.00 p.m.-Evening Prayer

318 W. Liberty St.

OPEN 24

HOURS

Use Daily Classifieds

Win or Lose!

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Pastors: H. G. Kroehler, A. C. Bizer,
W. C. Wright
9:30 a.m.-Worship Service
9:30 a.m.-Church School
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council k
Hit St. at S. Forest Ave.
SUNDAY

ST. AIDEN'S EPISCOPAL
(North Campus)
1679 Broadway
10:00 a.m.-Discussion Group.
11:00 a.m.-Service.

CHAPEL

Go to Blaises' Hearty Post
10.0022.0m.6 'MOAN

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CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
11:00' a.m.-Holy Communion; "Presentation
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