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November 09, 1968 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-09

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.Saturday, November 9, 1968

__eT.TH IHGA AL

,..t.,,d.,. . November. 9. .,. '1968..

cinema

Bunuel s bitter

Bach's cantatas fare well at
Hill with Chamber Choir

unclear passion

N- ONAL eENFPAI COR~PORATON
FO-x -ASTERN TiIATRE-,I
10H VILLarE
375 No. MAPLE RD.769-1300
MON.-THUR. - 8:00
FRI. ---6:30-9:15
SUN-i :00-3:45-6:30-9:15
SAT-3 :45-6:30-9:15
Unlike other classics
West Side Story"
grows younger!

By HENRY GRIX
The haggard Christ figure is
a fixture of contemporary art,
crucified most recently in the
APA's Hamlet and in Cool Hand
Luke.
That Luis Bunuel's bitter re-
telling of the myth of Jesus of
Nazareth pre-dated Paul New-
man can perhaps explain its
heavy-handedness, but it cannot
save it from seeming uninspir-
cd.
Nazarin, now showing at the
Fifth Forum, is a smeared car-
bon of the Old Testament,
which preaches an overheard
gospel; Christ was really a mas-'
ochist whose philosophy of self-
denial promises only self-des-
truction.
This time, the Nazarene is
from Spain, transplanted in
Mexico and living, as always, in
an unreal world. Unfortunately,
the director never fully defines
and develops the credibility gap
which exists between Christians
and their Christ even in the
mystical world of nineteenth
century Mexico.
Bunuel's forceful characters
are the products of the real
world: the saintly whores; sweat-
ty colonels and petty bourgeois
who populate the Mexican pro-
vinces.
However, the camera fails to
exploit the detail of peasant
hovels and merely scans the
panorama of cathedral plazas,
which from the vital backdrop
for Bunuel's updated p a s s i o n,
play.
The acting is at times second
rate, which must be expected
with the prosaic lines the play-'
ers are given to recite. Bunuel,
who helped adopt his screenplay
from a noval, and quite evident-
ly\ from the Spanish idiom of
the New Testament and the
Quixote, staged his drama to
the point of denying its life.
The Nazarin's great flaw is
that Father; Nazaro and, his
world arehdead from the begin-
ning. Isolated episodes like the
fight between the whores, the
Last Supper dialogue between
priest and disciples, the over-

whelming ending, are moving
and vital, but they stand alone,
distinct from what precedes and
what follows.
This episodic approach is, of
course, in the manner of the
New Testament. Bunuel illustra-
tes in Biblical style that the
Christian life is a series of
meaningless segments, not even
united ,by a consistent or satis-

fying philosophy. But the di-
rector succeeds at displaying,
above all, incoherence. Seg-
ments end; tales intertwine; the
characters travel from town to
town, do good, are beaten, pray,
all without cause and effect.
Part of the film's problem is
obviously a skimpy budget. The
disappointing camera work, the
choppy editing and poor acting

are the result of Bunuel n o t
having enough money to make
an elaborate, Belle de, Jour in
1958,. However, much of the poor
camera work, the dull screen-
play and stagey acting point
more clearly to Bunuel's inept-
ness in 1958.
At the same time, Bunuel's
pessimistic Christ myth has its
redeeming features.,Notably, the
film avoids becoming trapped in
satire on the pharasaical clergy,
and concentrates instead on
shooting barbs at the earnest
Father Nazario (Francisco Ra-
bal - ironically the aging con-
man of Belle de Jour).
As the film progresses, Rabal's
straightforward and impressive
acting acquires the psychologi-
cal complexity of a man yearn-
ing, but hesitant, to play God.
At first, he spouts platitudes
with regularity and sincerity
and is repulsed when adored as
a saint by hysterical women. Al-
though the camera work and
subplots undercut Rabal's por-
trayal, he is perfectly, passively
Christ-like for most of the film.
Blissfully ignorant of the cor-
ruption around him, the priest
lives with his two female dis-
ciples and preaches sermons of
love. Never does he realize it
is not the Word they want, but
the Word made flesh.
However, in the final minutes
of the film, to the terrifying,
exciting drum beat of a Spanish
passion play, Nazario is crush-
ed by the brutal futility of his
imitation of Christ.
Deprived of his apostles (who
are better off without him), the
father tries to act dignified,
priest-like and avoid the temp-
tation to beg ("All things be-
long to those who need them.")
But he succumbs, and marches
on, a prisoner, condemned to
die stupidly, worthlessly. Bun-
uel has made his point.

By JIM PETERS,
The University Chamber Choir
was on the wrong road in its
concert last night at Hill Aud.
But, in time, conductor Thomas
Hilbish found a road map and
things turned out pretty well.
The chorale music of Bach
was the fare in three cantatas
from a relatively late series,
numbers 130, 150, and 191. With
these works the troubles which
can arise are many. Due to the
really professional level of the'
singers, most of the vocal troub-
les, however, were non-existent.
I found much fault with the
orchestra in the beginning of
the concert. The awful intona-
tion of the violins was enough to
destroy the first cantata at its
very beginning; I listened to
the singers and ignored the or-
chestral group until they found
their proper place. Thankfully it
didn't take them too long.
The first cantata, "Aus d e r
Tiefe," starts out with a slow
orchestral and then choral in-
troduction, moving quite grad-
ually into the main body of the
piece with a very careful trans-
ition to a fast section. 4
Bass Joseph Long's w a r m
lyrical voice conveyed the pow-
er of Bach's musical line in his
bass aria. His warm tones were
sure, and he was dramatic
enough to be completely suc-
cessful.
But this was the problem
with the tenor aria which fol-
lowed. Jerrold Vandershaaf has
a beautiful voice; it is clear and
clean in the low tones and nev-
er sharp even in high sections.
But he just stood there and
mouthed the lyrics and followed
the score to the letter without
any emotion or expression.
He was a real disappointment,
but the chorus itself remained
fairly capable throughout the
first piece. Both of these arias

are backed by choral comments
and Hilbish kept the balance,
intact.
Despite the problems in the
strings, there were some stars in
in the orchestra. The continuo
was excellent; both the harp-
sichordist and the cellist did
some perfect work last night. I
marveled at some furious cello
lines which were executed with
ease.
,Cantata 150, "Nach dir, Herr,
verlangt mich," called for more
violins with no viola part at
all. This cantata with its aus-
tere instrumentation begins
with a. strangely emotional
opening chorus; starting and
stopping, hesitating, it changes
tempi in an almost conversa-
tional style.
Soprano Linda Oakley has a
small fragile voice; her aria,
however, was short, and her
voice never strained in the
quickly turning sections of her
piece.
The final offering, termed
Cantata 191, is an adaptation
of the "Gloria" from Bach's
Mass in B minor. Fusing the
opening section from this piece
with a short "Gloria PatriV' sec-
tion based on the "Cum Sancto
Spiritu" of the "Gloria," Bach
had another cantata to use
when he was pressed for time.
With full ensemble and full
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chorus, the piece moved along
with power and stateliness. Fin-
ally all the diverse and warring
elements came together; every-
one was working together and
working Well. But when you give
dedicated people the music of
Bach, good things usually hap-
pen.
ARK FILM SO(IETY
Jean Renoir's
THIS LAND
IS MINE
with
Charles Laughton
J Maureen O'Harq
George Sanders
MONDAY, NOV. 11
7:30 P.M.

MIRISCH PICTURES presents

PANA VISIONk
TECHINICOLOR
Re-released thru
United Artists

at the ARK

1421 Hill

Read and Use
Daly "Classifieds

*1

D.IAL
5-6290

JfMT

Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7, 9:05

Young at Canterbury

THIS IS
THE TRUE STORY
OF THE
SELF-CONFESSED
BOSTON
STRANGLER.
20th ntury-Fox
presentts TH
wlth BOSTON STRANGLER
TONY CURTIS HENRY FONDA
Next: "CAMELOT"

eil Young, former singer/comp
uffalo Springfield, appears this
Canterbury House. Many respecte
retrospect as one of the best Ame
Young, with an anticipated album
own.

'rTv.:v::" : s r.. ...S.....vv.. . .
DAILY OFFICIAL Bi
. . ..... . . . ... .................. ....... .

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication;of the Univer-
sity of lMichigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3528 L.S,&A. Bldg. before 2
p.m. of the day preceding publi-
cation and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. General No-
tices tay be published a maximum
of two times on request; Day Cal-
.endar items appear only once. Stu-
dent organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
,information call 764-9270.'
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9

tives and friends in Michigan League
Ballroom at 4:00 p.m. Please enter
League at west entrance.
Tickets: Four to each prospective{
graduate, to be, distributed from Mon-
day, December 2, to 1:00 p.m. Saturday,
December 14, at the Diploma Depart-
ment, 555 L. S. & A, Building, except on
Saturday, December 7, when office will;
be closed. Saturday, December 14, office
will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Academic Costume: May be rented atj
Moe Sport Shop, 711 North University
Avenue. Orders should be placed im-
mediately, and MUST be placed before
Noveniber 29.
Assembly for Graduates: at 1:00 p.m.
in Natural Science Auditorium. Mar-
sheals will direct graduates to proper,

oser/guitarist for the vanished
weekend as a solo performer at
ed critics view the Springfield in
rican bands of all time, and now
a, is doing some nice stuff on hisA
.m SATURDAY and SUNDAY
ULLETIN VIVRE SA VIE
written and directed by Jean-Luc Godard
Follett Corporation, Easton, Pa.: Pro- .<"Vivre Sa Vie is a tour
duct Design Engineer, BSME and 3 de style almost as start-
yrs, design on appliances, office or iong as breathless f
vending machines. I "o snetiles
Wayne County Health Department eNot Since Stllers came
Mich.: Nurses in Public Health, R.N era turned to store at
regis. in Mich., BS in Nursing, exper GarbO has a man made
not necess.
Monroe County Council of Camp such searing love with a
Fire Girls, Monroe, Mich.: Executive lens
Director, BA and 3-5 years work in
personnel or related agency, or a
MSW or MA in approp. area and 2-3
years exper, some supervisory. Other
positions of specialist, and director na-
Starring ANNA KARINA,
SUMMER PLACEMENT Mde. Godard (above)
SERVICE The storyof a Porisienne
212 $.A.B., Lower Level sales
epartment Of The Interiod. A girl forced by pov
chorage, Alaska. Fir~e Control, Smoke erty to turn to prOstitu-
Jumper, and surveying aid applic. .ac- tion.
ceped from now through Jan. 1.
General Electric Co., Chicago Heights,
Ill.: Assembly line work for men from 7:00 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
Dec..6 to Jan. 9. Good pay. Must live6
in south-suburb Chicago. 662-8 AUDITORIUM
Next application date for summer
jobs in federal government agencies is
)ec 6. 6

X
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t
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--SEE--
guitarist -singerof the Buffalo Springfield
alive and in person
at
ALSO: SingOut
magazine with
BOB DYLAN
TOIEFREE exclusive
and 8:00 EATS interviewonsale
NOW!
I SUNDAY-..--W!
SU

20th Centwy-Fot
STRANGLER
Pana.s,o,' Cocos tOe ue -MA'~

Da Cstatis
Day CaQndarPrograms: will be distributed at Hill
Auditorum.-
Football: U-M vs. $llinois: Michigan Candidates who qualify for a doc-
Stadium, 1:30 p.m. . toral degree from the iGraduate School
Cinema Guild: Jean-Luc Godards and who attend the graduation exercise
Vivre Sa Vie: Architecture Auditor- .ill be presented a hood by the Uni-
ium, 7:00 and 9:05 pm. versity at the ceremony.
School; of Music Joint Conicert: Uni-
versity Men's Glee Club - Philip DueyP
Conductor; University of Illinois Men'sG
Glee Club: Hill Auditorium, 7:00 and ' 3200 S.A.B.
9:00 p.m. GENERAL DIVISION
School of Music Degree Recital:

i
ii
;i
i
i1

Michael Jones, Viola: School of Music
Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
Russian Circle Movie: "Peter the
First," Part I, Multipurpose Room,
UGLI, 8:00 p.m.
eneral Notices
(9roadcastilng Service: W.UOM Radio
(91.7 Me.) 11. a.m. to 11 p.m. daily.
Sunday 12 Noon to 6 p.m. Saturday
1:15 p.m. Football: U-M vs. Illinois,
with Tom Hemingway reporting from
Ann Arbor. Saturday 9:30 p.m. The
Record Collector, with Prof. Warren
Good.
Sunday 1:30 pm. What Must Be Done
- "Money Sources" (Part 1), with
Osborne Elliott, Newsweek;, Dr. Vivian
Henderson, President, Clark College,
Atlanta; and Dr. Dick Netzer, N.Y.
University. Sunday 2:00 p.m. Cleveland
Orchestra Concert - Louis Lane con-
ducting. -
TV Center program: On Sunday, No-
vember 10 the following program pro-
duced by the TV Center will have its
initial telecast in Detroit: 12:00 Noon,
WWJ TV, Channel 4 - "The Aphasia
Story." An account of a tragic disease
and efforts to rehabilitate victims at
U-M Speech Clinic,
WINTER COMMERCEMENT,.
EXERCISES
December 14, 1968
To be' held at 2:00 p.m. in Hill Audi-
torlum. Exercises will conclude about
4:00 p.m. All graduates of the 1968 fall
term may attend.
Reception for graduates ,their rela-I

Current Position Openings received
by General Division by mail and phone,
not interviews on campus, call 764-7460,
or come to Placement Service for ap-
plication procedures,
I Mt. S ixyi Hospital of Cleveland, Ohio :
Positions ' for Chem.,Bio. Bacteriol.,
Physics, for med. technicians, and dieti-
tianS, in areas of Nursing, 0cc. and
"Phys. therapy, Social Work, Lab, and
research.
Electro-Mechanical Corporation, of
Sayre, Pa.: Project Design, Electronic,h
Stress Anal., and weight engineers, 2-4
years and approp. degrees.
National League for Nursing, Inc.,
N.Y.C,: MA and several years teaching
in specializations of maternal-child,
medical-surgical, psychiatric nursing,,
and nat'l. sci. areas. MA necess.
Jackson County, Missouri, Kansas
City area: Social service worker, MSW,
superviser counseling' and placement
activities.
Girl Scouts of U.S.A., Chicago, Ill.:
Assistant Personnel Specialist, BA. and!
admin exper. in this area. Methods'
and Procedures Analyst, BA and work
in manual syst.
Systems Research Laboratories, Day-
ton, Ohio*: Multidiscipline R&D work
for BSE/MSE in electro-mechanical, in-
strumentation, data syst., engrg. serv.,
adpoduct operations.
an prMarn Incorporated, Southfield,
Mich.: Seeks engrs with some expert
for project work.
IStateof Washington, Microbiologist,
BA and lab work, 3 yrs. exper.
State of Connecticut: Staff Develop-
ment Instructor, MSW and 1 yjar supv.
work with case supervisors,

Schedule of the Ni fty 650

I1

Sun
Noon
6 pm
7 pm
7:30
9:00
11:00
11:15'
11 :30
Signoff

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thr

Fri

Sat

ROCK
FORUM
news sports
folkways

ROCK
FORUM':*

news sports
S NEWS

R O C K
NEWS
SPORTS
ROCK

C E L L A R

NEWSN
SPORTS

NEW

NEWS

SPORTS
OLD MIDNITE
HITS SPECIAL

FORUM

"NAZARIN is one of
the great films of
Bunuel's career.. .
And made me remember something
Bunuel once said: 'To show with a
cold white eye what they have done
here on earth in the name of God."'
-Penelope Gilliatt, The New Yorker
"STUNNING-A movie that really glows
... the thing for you to see!"
-Judith Crist, Today S owWNBC
"An amazingly strong film with earmarks
of a classic. It should endure as one of his
best, most significant works. An exception-
al film to savor more than once.
-William Wolf, Cue
"More Bunuel than 'Belle de Jour' . .
Bunuel is one of the most audacious, single
minde dand creative directors in the history

FEROCIOUS
NSATIRE ...A
'MUST SEE'
TOP GRADE
PICTURE!"
-David Goldman,
WCBS
plus classic short by Luis
Bunuel and Salvador Dali
The ANDALUSIAN DOG'j

A

I

s ice! i _.... ! -' !

I

I

I

I

1,%"
:
1i

F'

WE DON'T DISCRIMINATE!
-But you'll have to wait your turn-!

of the cinema."

---N.Y. Times

I.-"

I

I

"The enormous power of NAZARIN will
leave you limp ... it shouldn't be missed by
any lover of fine cinema art."
-Frances Taylor, Long Island Press
"No one interested in cinema today, can af-
ford to miss it ... a starkly, simple, beauti-
ful parable, which is visually' a Goya etch-

Sat & Sun, 3, 5, 7, 9
ti0
4r
'"C .1.

THE SPY WHO CAME
IN FROM THE COLD

* ng -

-Bernard L. Drew, Hartford Times ,LIlS RIJNIF

L3C

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