100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 08, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, November 8 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Friday, November 8, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

EXI-PRESIDENCY

Where do you go after

the

White

House?

Hoover Roosevelt Truman

Eisenhower

Kennedy Johnson

WASHINGTON (A) - In
American folklore any boy can
grow up to be president.
The legend is less than fac-
tual. But its promise of power
and glory has goaded men to
seek what Theodore Roosevelt
called "a position as great as
that of the mightiest mon-
arch." It offersto make a man,
in Herbert Hoover's words, "a
4 link in the long chain of his
country's destiny."
But of the men who have
dwelt in the White House,
many have spoke their disil-
lusionment.

"My God! What is there in
this place that a man should
ever want to get in it," cried
James Garfield.
"The responsibilities of the
office ought to sober a man
even before he approaches it,"
said Woodrow Wilson.
"I have had enough of it,
heaven knows," said William
McKinley. "I have had all the
honor there is in the place and
have responsibilities enought to
kill any man."
The presidency, in George
Washington's eyes, required

U

"unremitting attention." It was
"dignified slavery" to Andreu
Jackson; "anxiety, tribulation
and abuse" to Abraham Lin-
coln.
Grover Cleveland, the only
president to gain a second term
after being defeated for re-elec-
tion, said paradoxically: "I do
not want the office. It involves
responsibility beyond human
strength."
Harry S. Truman likened
being president to riding a tiger:
"A man has to keep riding or
be swallowed."
To run the White House of-
fice alone takes 250 people with
a payroll of more than $3 mil-
lion a year. Lyndon B. John-
son's roster lists no fewer than
eight special assistants and
seven consultants or counsels.
As the White House has
grown more powerful, presi-
dents , have increasingly at-
tempted to delegate authority
to aides. Some of these assis-
tants have become better known
and more influential than mem-
bers of the president's Cabinet,
who often must forego their
function as advisors to tend
to their own bureaucracies, or
elected officials.
Harry Hopkins, the man

-Next-
BARBARELLA

SHOWS
AT '
7:10 & 9:20
1-3-5
FOURTH
WEEK

Franklin Roosevelt turned to
most often, acted as ambassa-
dor without portfolio; Truman
had Clarke Clifford; Sherman
Adams became a filter through
which passed all access to Eisen-
hower, and Kennedy had his
brother Bob and Ted Sorenson.
Eisenhower advocated a "first
secretary of the government," to
take on some of the presidency's
burdens. A Senate committee
rejected the proposal. "Only one
official has the constitutional
and political power required to
assume that role and mainiii n
it," the committee said. "That
official is the president of - the
United States. He cannot be
relived ' of his burdens by sup-
plying him with a deputy' to
do what only he can do."
Truman said it more simply
a few years earlier with a sign
on his desk : "The, Buck Stops
Here."
)Each president shapes the of-
fice to fit his own personality.
Roosevelt was a connoisseur of
power and he had - no peer in
knowing what it was, where and
how to get it, and how to use
it.
Eisenhower brought to the
White House a soldier's concept
of doing things through chan-
nels. When command failed, he
was frustrated or efisheartened.
He didn't enjoy the politics of
power; he was an anti-politician
in a politician's seat.
Truman, who would have been
happy to remain in the Senate
the rest of his life, nevertheless
became a decisive president. In
fact, this distinguished Truman
from Roosevelt, who was prone
to defer decisions, and from
NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION y
FOX EASTERN THEATRES
FUH VILUIGE
375 No. MAPLE RD.-769.1300
MON.-THUR. -- 8:00
FRI. - 6:30-9:15
SUN---1 :00-3:45-6:30-9 :15
SAT-3:45-6:30-9:15
Unlike other classics
West Side Story"
grows younger!

Eisenhower, who believed in a
minimal use of presidential
power. Critics often have called
Truman impulsive, but his sup-
porters say, in reality, he soli-
cited all shades of opinion be-
fore coming to a decision. But
once it was made, he expected
subordinates to accept and sup-
port it.
John Kennedy was distrust-
ful of bureaucracy and turned,
instead, to his brother Robert
and to the talented, ambitous,
strong-willed men that were his
inner circle. Like Roosevelt,
Kennedy often set them against
each other. Aides have recalled,
for example, that he, diked to
assign two or more people to re-
search a particular action, then
pick the best points of each.
Lyndon Johnson, p e r h a p s
most like Roosevelt in the
knowledge of how to get anduse
power, looks toward younger
men for action and older men,
such as Clark Clifford, for ad-
vice. Like Eisenhower, Johnson
employs a formal chain of com-
mand, and uses his staff watch
over affairs of various agencies.
Unlike Eisenhower, he seldom
delegates authority.
If the Washington community
of legislators, agency offigials
and the press sense that the
public supports the President,
his power to persuade - and
hence his power to act -- is
enhanced. ,
Woodrow Wilson, in his effort
to have the United States be-
come a member of the League
of Nations, was a classic example.
In order to get Senate ratifi-
cation he needed public support.
Wilson took his case tothe peo-
ple, failed to get public back-
ing, and the Senate rejected his
efforts.
"I suppose I am the most
powerful man in the world."
Calvin Coolidge said, "but great
i power does not mean much ex-
cept great limitations. I cannot
have any freedom even to go*
and come. I am only in the
clutch of forces that are great-
a
er thanti I am."
For every president who sur-
f gives the office, there is the
blessing of retirement to look
forward to. But is it a blessing?
Retirement to do what? What
is left after years in what Tru-
man called "the finest prison
in the world."

Freedom," say& Lyndon John-
son. "Fr'eedom to be my own
man. To hike in the pastures
14 or 15, miles a day with no
phones and no reporters. To
sleep under the stars. To be able
to take my wife by the' hand
and walk through the woods
without 40 Secret Service men
around."
In England, and elsewhere, a
man can be voted out of the
prime minister's office and still
retain his seat in Parliament.
America's system of government
assigns no role at all to the
man who has had the unique
experience of being president.
"Most people never stop to
think about what happens to a
roan who has been president -of
the United States," Truman
said. "The day he is elected
president, he suddenly finds
himself at the top of the world,
where he sits for a while, hold-
ing the destinies of millions in
his hands, making decisions that
change the course of history.
Then, just as suddenly, hg is
again at the level . of John
Jones who lives next door."
All that is left for ex-presi-
dents, said Herbert Hoover, is
"to take pills and dedicate li-
braries."
But Hoover, Truman and Ei-
senhower were active in retire-
ment and there is every indica-
tion that Johnson will be, too.
While he was physically able,
Truman lectured at universities.
He and Eisenhower :each wrote
extensive memoirs and saw to it
that memorial libraries, bearing
their names were established,
primarily for the benefit of his-
torians seeking additional data
on their administrations. Hoo-
ver was called back into im-
portant government service by
Truman after World War II.
Johnson has made extensive
plans for memoirs and a libra-
ry to house his papers.
There are surprises awaiting
the man who leaves the White
House, just as there are for the
man entering.
"I look forward to the day
when the press won't give a
damn about me as copy, when I
can walk in and get a beer and
a hamburger somewhere without
being regarded as outrageous,"
said Johnson.
He might find it doesn't turn
out that way.

the
n e ws day
by The Associated Press atzd College Press Service
THE 51ST ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION of the
Bolshevik Revolution in Moscow yesterday reflected
growing ties with the United States.
The keynote address, delivered by Defense Minister
Andrei Grechko was the mildest in years, omitting the usual
direct attacks on the United States and even omitting men-
tion of the Vietnam War.
However, the celebration was not lacking in international
tensions. Ambassadors of North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tions boycotted the reviewing stand, reportedly in protest
of the Soviet Union's August invasion of Czechoslovakia,
" i "
THE FOREIGN MINISTERS of Egypt and Jordan
withdrew at least temporarily from talks with Israel
yesterday,
The talks have been going on at United Nations head-,,
quarters through a UN intermediary, Gunnar Jarring of
Sweden.
Both ministers expressed dissatisfaction with the attitude
Israel has taken in the discussions. Israel has been report-
edly placing emphasis on security rather than the question
of the territory it occupies as a result of the June 1967 war.
A FEDERAL GRAND JURY has refused to indict nine
highway patrolmen on civil rights charges after com-
pleting their investigation of the shooting deaths of three
black students in Orangeburg, S.C. last February.'
The three students-two who attended South Carolina
State College and the other an Orangeburg high school
student-were fatally shot during a confrontation of young
blacks and police on the fringe of the college campus.
. The confrontation climaxed racial tension in Orange-
burg which resulted from attempts of college students to
integrate the only bowling alley in the city. Ithas since been
integrated by federal order. .
i i i "
NEW YORK POLICE arrested scores of anti-war
protesters yesterday as they entered the student center
at City College of New York where a 19-year-old AWOL
soldier had been given sanctuary.
Police said at least 135 students were arrested. They had
been living at the center in an effort to prevent the arrest
of Pvt. William Brakefield, who sought sanctuary there a few
weeks ago after going AWOL from Fort Devens, Mass:
THE CONTROVERSIAL POLICE DIRECTOR of Ne-
wark, N.J. was cleared yesterday of charges that he deli-
berately failed to crackdown on gambling.
Superior Court Judge Samuel Larner ruled that because
Police Director Dominick Spina's methods were different,
"less efficient, less successful than those of other agencies,
does not establish criminal non-feasance." I
Spina's indictment last July followed a charge in the gov-
ernor's riot commission that a "pervasive feeling of corrup-
tion" existed in Newark.
The commission investigated the 1967 racial rioting In
New Jersey.
A MEMPHIS STRIKE by 1,000 non-,professional
workers at city-owned hospitals was settled yesterday.
The strike was similar to the one by the city's sanitation
workers which brought the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King
to Memphis where he, was assassinated April 4.
Like the, sanitation workers, most of the hospital em-
ployes are black. Both strikes were characterized by num-
erous marches on City Hall and boycotts of downtown
stores.

A

ewHeart is a'Lone1'Hunter

I

I

1
1
1
o
1
1

DANDORAMA
Featuring the
UNIVERSITY OFMICHIGAN BANDS
with
GUEST XYLOPHONE SOLOIST JOHN HENEY
Formerly of the Sousa Band
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16
8:00 P.M. HILL AUDITORIUM
ALL SEATS RESERVED. TICKETS $2.00-$1.50
General Sales begin MONDAY, November 11, 9:00-4:00 at
Hill Auditorium Box Office and continue daily thru showtime.
Mail orders of 10 or more will be accepted by writing to
Bandorama, Michigan Bands School of Music, North Campus,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105. Orders must be accompanied by
check or money order with self-addressed stamped envelope.
No orders accepted after Nov. 9..

MIRISCH PICTURES presents

3020 Washtenow, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor
This is a
Remarkable Motion Picture
Based on fact
20th Century Fox
STRANGLER
* a~so'Colo, y e "seSMA :

44
gill I
.

a AM mk ---dft m -

l

00

:
1i

w

l

PRINCE NORODOM SIHANOUK of Cambodia said
yesterday he would releake 11 American prisoners if
President Johnson promises the united States will try to
.,stop, bombing incidents along the frontier with' South
Vietnam.
Sihanouk, said, he was holding the Americans ' as host-
ages to make sure no more Cambodians were killed along the
border by U.S: and South Vietnamese forces.
The offer was a dramatic reduction of the prince's earlier
demands. He had asked the United States to issue formal
recognition of Cambodian borders and deny the South
Vietnamese claim to several offshore islands involved in a
dispute between the two nations.
! ! ! ! "
I THE GOVERNMENT has 'ordered federally insured
banks to tighten up security by installing cameras and
alarm systems.
The four agencies which regulate federally insured banks
and savings and loan associations yesterday set deadlines of
1970 and 1971 for the installation of a series of security
mechanisms.

1

I

Litter doesn't throw
itselfaway; litter
doesn't just happen.
People cause it-and
only people can prevent;'
it. "People" means you.
Keep America Beautiful.
-,,advertising contributed
,for the public good

ff w w

": . L.... :tiff: y,, L:iW
PANAVISION"
TECHNICOLOR
Re-released thru
United Artists

I

THE SPY WHO CAME
IN., FROM THE COLD

RICHARD BURTON
OSCAR WERNER

i

from a novel by JOHN LECARRE

NOV. 8-9

RUSS G/BB presents in Detroit
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY
Bud.dy Guy
FRIDAY: Charging Rhinocerous of Soul
SATURDAY: The March Brothers
SUNDAY: The Case of E. T. Hooley
GRANDE BALLROOM
Grand River at Beverley, I block south of Joy
Admission $3.00 8:30 p.m.

'

I

i{

NOW -1279TEMM DIAL,
8=6416
Dedicated to every man who has ever had to
lie a iot...lust
!r f r
c.
... to love a htt e
.: :::: :i::: :::: r i ::: ::::.::::

3 '

fl

00
O
O
:too
'i tin

,ma
THURSDAY and FRIDAY
THE THIRD MAN

I

... >;:

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan