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November 07, 1968 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-07

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, November 7, 1968

PQge Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

..hur.day. November,,, 7. .,96.

I

EIGHT YEAR ABSENCE
Nixon comes back from near political oblivion

(Continued from Page 1)

longest war in American hi

before the election he would go the highest taxes in American
to Saigon or Paris if necessary tory, the worst crime wav
to get peace negotiations "off American history, the highes
dead center." creases in prices in a gener
Then, the man who lost to John the lowest respect for Ameri
F. Kenedy by 120,000 votes in the have ever had."
1960 Presidential race-but came Nixon said he got no seep
back to become the first candi- the the long night and morai
date in this century to win the vote counting, and he clearly
presidency on the second try- ed weary.
headed for three days of rest in Although Johnson has of
Key Biscayne, Fla. Nixon government office spa
In his speech, Nixon pounded Washington, the Republican
away at those grievanmes: "The said he will make New Yor]
Returns by States,

story,
m his-
me in
st in-
ation,
ca we
dur-
ang of
look-
ffered
ace in
n has
k, his

POPULAR VOTE

Z'
ALA. 88
ALAS. 69
ARIZ. 84
ARK. 53
CAL. 96
COL. 97
CONN. 100
DEL. 100
D.C. 100
FLA. 93
GA. 87
HAW. 88,
IA. 97
ILL. 95
IND. 98
IOWA 99
KAN. 91
KY. 94
LA. 97
ME. 94
MD. 100,
MASS. 88
MICH. 96
MINN. 96
MISS. 97
MO. 94
MON. 74
NEB. 98
NEV. 95
N. U. 95
N. J. 99
N. M. 95
N. Y, 100
N. CAR' 100
N. DAK 79
OHIO 98
OKLA. 94
ORE. '97'
PENN. 92
R.I. 100
8. CAR 93
S. DAK 94
TENN. 96
TEX. 85
UTAHU 100
VER. 95
VA. j 9
WASH. 85
W.'VA. 100
WIS. 99
WO. 86
TOTALS

L-0

140,056-15
21,221-44
136,143-35
79;961-31
3,093,093-45
331,920-42
624,661-50
88,119-42'
136,452-82
569,184-30
305,457-'--27
139,784-60
83,972-31
1,929,254-442
783,321-381
464,554--41:
268,292-35
365,669-38
304,041-29
212,484-55
5a19,787-43
1,278,036-63
1,554,647-491
824,531-54
144,697-23
701,814-45
75,752-44
162,416-32'
56,164-40
125,230-44
1,245,748-451
126,838-40
3,444,812-502
462,601-29
76,075-39
1,661,813-431
278,550-32
324,758-44
2,015,359-471
239,497-65
192,348-30
108,015-41
345,259-28
3,044,722-421
155,999-36
70,792-44
437,173-33
500762--48
373,326-50
745,565-44
37,015-36
29,677,152-43 29

138,300-14
21,714-45
216,431-56
72,293-28
3,262,315-48
405,714-51.
557,830-44
-5,686-45
29,617-18
753,838-40
346,021-30
89,359-38
155,173-57
2,064,756--47
1,037,746-50
601,592--53
419,577-55
419,916-44
249,397-23
164,477-43
500,600-42
650,544-32
1,303,320-41
635,822-41
85,714-14
690,451-44
$5,204--49
297,341-59
66,035-47
147,633-52
1,299,461-46
164,350-52
2,96',987-44
626,690-39
109,078-56
1,767,421-45
405,123-47
362,986-49
1,898,388--45
115,929-31
251,370-39
136,390-51.
455,402-38
1,002,000-40
247,309-59.
84,013-53
582,818-44
463,675- 45
305,667-41
807,698-48
57,571-55
9,726,409-43

626,623-65
5,310-11
35,357- 9
106,438--41
465,129- 7
59,357- 7
76,707- 6
27,608-13
0- 0
560,236-30
491,898-43,
3,104- 1
34,411-13
361,554- 8
237,771-12
65,407- 6
77,827-10
175,425-18
512,627-48
6,307- 2
177,432-15
87,119- 4
313,718-10
70,877- 5
/ 398,382-63
175,511-11
12,247- 7
41,973- 8
18,277-13
10,453- 4
253,411- 9
25,055- 8
347,786- 5
497,482-31
11,115- 6
464,319-12
175,392-20
46,697- 6
33,163- 8
14,967- 4
207,363--32
2,1,167- 8
412,534-34
470,354-19
26,977- 6
4,846- 3
318,065-24
75,277- 7
71,774-10
127,014- 8'
9,181- 9
9,291,807-14

.
I
'
J
7
7
l
1;
.r
i
t
L

Electoral
Vote
a
0 0 10
0 3. 0
0 5 0
0 0 6
0 40 0
0 6 0
8 0 0
0 3 0r
3 0 0
0 14 0
0 0 12
4 0 0
0 4 0
0 26 0
0 13 0
0 9 '0
0 7 0
0 9 0
0 0 10
4 0 0
10 0 0
14 0 0
21 0 0
10 0 0
0 0 7
12 0 0
0 4 0
0 5 0
0 3 0
0 4 0
0 17 0
0 4 0
43 0 0
0 13 0
0 4 0
0 26 ,0
0 8 0
0 6 0
29 0 0
4 0 0
0 8 0
0 4 0
0 11' 0
25 0 0
0 .4 0
0 3 0
0 12 0
9 0 '0
7 0 0
0 12 0
0 3 0
03 290 45

adopted city, his pre-inaugural
headquarters.
With Nixon in victory were his
wife Pat, their daughters Julie and
Patricia, and Julie's fiance, David
Eisenhower..
Besides getting a formal wire
from Humphrey, Nixon received a
phone call from the vice presi-
dent. He said he told the vice
president that he sympathized
with him and knew how he must:
feel - having lost a close election
to John F. Kennedy in 1960. To his
ballroom audience, Nixon said:
"Winning is a lot. more fun."
Itwasn't fun,' however, for the
Democratic .candidates.
Humphrey and his running
mate, ;Sen. Edmund S. Muskie of
Maine, after winning the Demo-
ratic nominations in a conven-
tion held under armed guard be-
cause of Chicago street disorders,
began their campaign with polls
showing them 15 percentage points
behind Nixon and; Agnew.
But in the final weeks they
closed the gap so rapidly that
professional pollsters said the race
was too close to predict a win-
ner.
While vote-rich Illinois and Cal-
ifornia put him over the top,
Nixon laid the foundation for his
victory by capturing crucial bord-
3r states and sweeping virtually all
Midwest, Mountain and Far West
3tatesi
-He carried 30 states in all and
was ahead in one other.
Humphrey, whose strategy was
built on winning the big industrial
States, carried New York, Pennsyl-
vania, Michigan, Texas, and seven
ather states, plus the District of
Columbia. But Nixon grabbed New
Jersey and Ohio - and the Demo-
,ratic hopes collapsed.
In one oddity, Humphrey car-
ried the home states of all four
major candidates - his own
Minnesota, Nixon's New York, Ag-
new's Maryland and Muskie's
Maine.

Wallace, the first third-party
candidate of the century to get
his name on the ballot in all
states, campaigned against the
"pseudo-intellectuals," the su-
preme Court, the pollsters, the
news media, and the "long-haired
anarchists" who heckled him from
coast to coast.
He had hoped to keep both Nix-
:n and Humphrey from winning
a majority of electoral votes. Un-
less a compromise could have been
worked out in the Electoral Col-
lege, this would have left to choice

to the House where Southerners
presumably would have had a
powerful bargaining position.
But Wallace failed to win any
state outside the South. His 45
electoral votes, collected in Ala-
bama, Arkansas. Georgia, Louisi-
ana and Mississippi, barely top-
ped the 39 electoral votes Sen.
Strom Thurmond of South Caro-
lina won as a third-party candi-
date 20 years ago.
And his popular vote was far
aff his claims and below estimates
of many polls.
---- -

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

County to maintain

CONCERT DANC
ORGAN IZATIO '
BETIT
LEADING SOLOIST

"E1

PROFESSIONAL
THEATER PROGRAM

resents

*

0

. " .y
l *
J
II
L a

0

conservative image

(Continued from Page 1) I
"I'm going to be fighting spec-
ifically for some new social wel-
fare programs geared to helping
people and not geared to making
them dependents," Edmonds says.
But Edmonds is realistic" "I
don't think we'll be able to do the
things we should do. The board is
very conservative."
Edmonds' fellow liberal, Demo-
crat William Winters, is president
of a local union in Ypsilanti. The
two will spend much of their tine
trying to convince the board's
third Democrat, Aloysius P. Mi-
ick of Willis, to "groove with the
times."
Unfortunately, Minick is almost
as old as the combined ages of Ed-
monds and Winters and will not so
easily find faults with the board's
past performances. Minick has
twice served as chairman of the
county Democratic party.
County citizens also returned
.the three S's to the State Legis-
lature: arch-conservatives T o m
Sharpe (51st district), Roy Smith
(52nd district) and Ray Smit
(53rd district). A hard campaign

FRI., NOV. 8
at the Michigan League

9-12

__

waged by present Democratic
county chairman George Sallade
against Smit went down in de-
feat 17,890 to 13,750.
The three men are another in-
dication of thecounty's continu-
ing conservatism. They took al-
most 60 per cent of the vote cast in
all three races.
Not counting Harvey, conserva-
tive Republicans took all of the
county offices. Present chairman
of the county supervisors Robert,
Harrison is the new county clerk.:
Harrison's election marks to end
of a 30-year regime by Luella M.
Smith, who retired this year.
Mrs. Smith, however, could pro-
bably have retained her position,
for the number of years-in-office
seemed to be a helpful factor in
this year's county elections. Of ten
incumbent supervisors, only two
were not elected to office this
time. And Patricia Newkirk Hardy,'
13 years the county's register of
deeds, was reelected to her posi-
tion by the largest margin of any
Republican candidate in the
county - almost 15,000 votes.

YJONES
WITH JOSE LIMON DANCE COMPANY
in a concert-lecture
""DANCES'
I DANCE"/
with FRIZ LUDIN
Program inludes excerpts
from "INVENTION," "MISSA
BREVIS" and "THERE IS A TIME,"
plus
"JOURNEY NO. 2: FOR AN ANGEL
AND A CLOWN"

FREE ENTERTAINMENT
Featuring the SIX OF SPADES
Come to
LITTLE CLU B

..... ... .......

r

DEC. 6

TRUE BLOOD THEATER

8:30 P.M.

Tickets now on sale at'PI'OFESSIONAL THEATER PROGRAM
TICKET OFFICE, MEN DELSSOHN THEATER'

;.

I.

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NAZARIN is one of the great f 'is
of B nelscareer .. .
And made me remember something Bunuel once said:
'To show with a cold white eye what they have done here
on earth in the name of God."'
--Penelope Gilliatt, The New Yorker
"STUNNING---A movie thatreally glows ... the thing for you

4

to seel "

-Judith Crist, Today Show, NBC

TONIGHT at
ROGER CRAIG
speaking on "LAW AND ORDER CLAMP-DOWN
INTHE LEGISLATURE," also commentary on the , 1421 Hill St.
ELECTIO... ' $:3C1 P.M. I
FRIDAY--
DY SUCCOP_-
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and folk music accompanied by 'guitar
SATURDAY-
WALDEN TWO-
(from East Lansing) singing folk and folk-rock music,
playing bassonova guitar instrumentals.
THURSDAY and FRIDAY
THE THIRD MAN
Directed by Carol Reedy with Graham Greene, 1949.
ORSON TREVOR JOSEPH
WELLES HOWARD COTTEN
A Hitchcockian thriller of cold war spies,
black market penicillin, and intrigue in Vienna.
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-William Wolf, Cue

"More Bunuel than 'Belle de Jour' ... Bunuel is one of the most
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2 EXCITING NEW PLAYS!
A -powerfWlandprophetic An imaginative and
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THE WORLD PREMIERE OF
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Adapted by RUTH WILLARDEVAN HUNTER
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Directed by

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"The enormous power of NAZARIN will leave you
limp .... it shouldn't be missed by any lover of
fine cinema art."
-Frances Taylor, Long Island Press
"No one interested in cinema today, can afford to
miss it . . . a starkly, simple, beautiful parable,
which is visually, a Goya etching."
-Bernard L. Drew, Hartford Times
LUIS BUNUELUS
UAZI
trring francisc b i
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CANNES
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