100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 06, 1968 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE M.C I ;AN r)II V

LAt_._1___ _I__.. k __ ___t ,!* wltsA

TI-iF KAICi.-4lCAkf r'~AIIV

Vednesday, November 6, 1968

3

GOP

marks

minimal

gains

in

Congress

Democrats to maintain control
of majority in House, Senate
. (Continued from page 1)
Two traditions appear to be re-
turning to the Senate in January
leader, and Barry Goldwater. With
seventeen per cent of the votes STATE Pct. Units DEMOCRAT REPUBL
counted, Dirksen held a slim lead Reporting
and early returns from Arizona Alabama Allen H
showed Goldwater leading sub- ASchwenH
stantially.h Alaska 3 Gravel 836 Rasmuso
Another prominent anti - warA kGraenin36(x)smus
critic and one - time presidential **Gruening (x) 340 G
candidate George McGovern of Arizona 8 Elson 17,563 Goldwater E 2
South Dakota, with 35 per cent Arkansas 35. Fulbright (x) E 89,431 Bernard 5
of the vote counted, held a 4,000 Calif. 1 Cranston E 23,827 Rafferty 1
vote lead over Republican Archie **Jacobs
Gubbrud. Colorado McNichols Dominic
In Ohio, Democrat John J. Gilli- Connecticut 75 Ribicoff (x) E ,617,235 May 51
gan was trailing Republican Wil- Florida 12 Collins 260,307 Gurney 30
,liam B. Saxbe at 3 a.m. Gilligan, Georgia 3 Talmadge (x) E 53,182 Patton 1
a noted war critic, trailed 1,309,643 Hawaii Inouye (x)'Thi
to Saxbe's 1,319,898. Idaho Church (x) Ha
Along with McGovern, and Gil-IdhCurh(iH
ligan, Sen. Joseph Clark of Penn- Illinois 17 Clark 300,408 Dirksen (x) 27
sylvania faced an uphill fight. Indiana 76 Bayh (x) 835,560 Ruckelshaus 78
Clark, a war critic, was losing to Iowa 72 Hughes 414,533 Stanley 38
Richard S. Schweiker by 20,000 Kansas Robinson
votes with 39 per cent of the re- Kentucky 94 Peden 417,238 Cook 45
turns counted. ILouisiana Long (x) E Unopl
Harold E. Hughes, Democratic Maryland 15 Brewster (x) 35,607 Mathias 5
governor of Iowa, who nominated **Mahoney 18,161
Eugene McCarthy at the Chicago Missouri , 90 Eagleton E 725,886 Curtis 67
convention, led his Republican Nevada 1 Bible (x) 101 Fi
opponent, David M. Stanley by
25,000 votes, with 75 per cent of New Hamp. 12 King 4,102 Cotton (x) E
the vote tabulated. New York O'Dwyer Javits
By 3 a.m. Birch Bayh, after a *****Buckley
see-saw battle, took a substantial N. Caro. 17 Ervin (x) E 46,286 Somers 2
lead over his Republican chal- N. Dakota Lashkowitz Young
lenger William D. Ruckelhaus. Ohio 70 Gilligan 1,309,643 Saxbe 1,31
Withe68Bper cent of the vote Oklahoma 4 Monroney 25,148 Bellmon 3
counted Bayh led 770,095 to 720,- Oregon 67 Morse (x) 257,403 Packwood 26
782 in the face of a strong Re- Pen79Clrse(x)9274chweikwrod 25
publican national ticket. Penn. 39 Clark (x) 938,627 Schweiker E 95
Wisconsin Democrat Gaylord S. Caro. 50 Hollings (x) E 158,583 Parker 9
Nelson ;on a second term in the S. /Dakota 35 1 McGovern E 17,307 Gubbrud 1
Senate when his Republican op- Utah Weilenmann Bennett
ponent, State Sen. Jerris Leonard, Vermont Unopposed Aike
conceded defeat with 14 per cent Wash. 2 Magnurson (x) 1,826 Metcalf
of the vote in, and 64 per cent of Wisc. 14 Nelson E 107,542 Leornard 6
it going to Nelson. Vote totals are those as of midnight.
In notable House contests, four (E)-Indicates elected.
black candidates appeared to have (x)-denotes incumbent
won election. New Democratic Party candidate
In New York City, Mrs. Shirley NWritePn candidate
Chisholm, a Democrat, became **Peace and Freedom Party candidate
the first Negro woman ever elect- ***Peaendedd
ed to Congress when she upset
James Farmer, former head of ' * * *Conservative Party candidate
the Congress ,of Racial Equality.'
Farmer, aliberal Republican who
had endorsed Humphrey for Pres-
ident, was defeated by Mrs. .Chis- ernatorialnw Raerict
holnm in a new district.
But the indomitable Adam Clay- STATE Pct. Units DEMOCRAT REPUBLI
ton Powell, Harlem Congressman Reporting
excluded from the 90th Congress Arizona 4 Goddard 15,307 Williams (x) E 2
on charges of misusing federal Arkansas 31 Crank 49,215 Rockefeller (x) E 5
funds, was re-elected, setting the Delaware 94 Terry (x) 91,250 Peterson E 9
stage for another possible chal- Illinois 57 Shapiro (x) 591,489 Ogilvie 83
lenge to his seating in the new Indiana 68 Rock 751,286 Whitcomb 84
House session. He defeated Re- Iowa 2 Franzenburg 5,965 Ray
publican Henry L. Hall and Con- Kansas 4 Docking 290,123 Hayman 26
servative Joseph McGuire.M
Meanwhile, St. Louis elected its Missouri Hearnes (x)
first Negro Congressman, Dem- Montana 11 Anderson 22,669 Babcock 1
ocrat William L. Clay. Another New Hamp. 2 Bussiere 1,021 Peterson E]
black Democrat, Louis Stokes, New Mex 45 Chavez 126,132 Cargo (x) 12
brother of Cleveland Mayor Carl N. Caro. 36 Scott 263,323 Gardner 21
Stokes, was leading in a new N. Dakota Guy (x) McCa
Cleveland district. Rhode Is. 100 Licht E 191,053 Chafee (x) 17
In New York's fifth district, South Dakota 3 Chamberlain 1,067 Farrar '
Democrat Allard Lowenstein de- Texas 2 Smith 38,363 Eggers 3
feated Mason Hampton for a seat Utah 13 Rampton (x) 31,464 Buehner 1
in the 91st Congress. Vermont 2 Daley 1,489 Davis E
In Louisiana's second district, Wash. 11 O'Connell 52,907 Evans (x) 5
Democrat Hale Boggs overcame W. Va. 85 Sprouse 320,971 Moore 32
the opposition of Republican chal- Wisconsin 45 LaFollette 491,892 Knowles (x) 53
lenger David. Treen. Vote totals are those as of 3 a.m.
And in New York City's 17th d s.
"Silk stocking district," where ( denotes incumbent.
Mayor John Lindsay served, a E-denotes elected,
Democrat Edward I. Koch upset
the Republican Whitney Seymour. "
Several prominent Congressmen
had coasted to re-election as of ue. 1r
2:30 this morning, helping to

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

t

ICAN
ooper
517
0,206
6,305
5,908
k (x)
9,004
3,764
3,414
essen
ansen
8,141
2,403
6,361
Dole
0,632
posed
8,831
2,954
ke 86
7,326
(x)
7,357
(x)
9,898
0,305
8,759
8,157
4,119
3,669
(x)
n (x
1,213
4,278

Ellis wins
race for
supervisor
(Continued from page 1)
* Incumbent Richard Walter-
house (R) defeated Eugenia S.
Carpenter for Ann Arbor Ward,
Four;
* Incumbent Albert Bredernitzl
(R) defeated Barbara S. Stevens
in the Ninth District-Milan City,
York Township, Saline and Pitts-
field townships;
* Democrat Aloysius Minick
defeated Republican Maxe A.
Obermeyer in the Tenth District
-sections of Ypsilanti and Ypsi-
lanti township and Augusta town-
ship;
O Incumbent Republican How-
ard Hand (defeated Burleson M.
Fitzharris in the Eleventh Dis-
trict-a major portion of tpsi-
lanti;
O Democrat Donald M. Ed-
monds defeated Republican Ken-
neth H. Hawks in the Twelfth
District-sections of Ypsilanti and
Ypsilanti township;
O Democrat William E. Winters
defeated Republican Melvin E.
iStillwagon in the Thirteenth Dis-
trict-sections of Ypsilanti town-
ship.
RESULTS BY DISTRICT
1st DISTRICT (48)
X-Bradbury (R) 14821
2nd DISTRICT (87)
X-Mast (R) 35701
Hunawill (D) 1443I
3rd DISTRICT (97)
X-Taylor (R) 2737
Starwas (D) 2222
4th DISTRICT (93)
X-Ellis (R) 3976
Rowry (D) 2545
5th DISTRICT (94)
X'-Teachout (D) 2616
Byrd (R) 2975
6th DISTRICT (94)
Walterhouse (R) 4144
Carpenter (D) 2682
7th DISTRICT (91)
X-Nielsen (R) 1631
Brazer (D) 1596
8th DISTRICT (92)
X- Williams (D) 3447
Lands (R) 3986
9th DISTRICT (42)
X-Bredernitz (R) 1190
Stevens (D) z 688
10th DISTRICT (95)
Obermeyer Sr. (R) 2226
Minick (D) 2790
11th DISTRICT (97)
X-Hand (R) 2159t
Fitzharris (D) 16361
12th DISTRICT (95)
Hawks (R) 16141
Edmonds (D) 21421

NedradrDunn wuin
in ti ght race for Regent'

A strong Humphrey showing in
the state has apparently elected
Democrats to all the state educa-
tion boards.
Late returns show Democrats
Robert Nederlander and Gerald
R. Dunn leading in the contention
for the two openings on the Uni-
versity Board of Regents.
They overcame early leads by
the Republican incumbents Fred-
erick Matthaei Jr. and Lawrence
Lindemer.
Nederlander, a graduate of the
University Law School, stressed
budget concerns, the pressures of
increased enrollment, the recruit-
ment of qualified faculty, and the
development of the Residential
College program.
He supported using University
resources to help solve social prob-
lems.

Dunn is a former state senator Johnson said the one challenge member of the state Legislature
and chairman of the Senate Ed- for the Regents is that of the and was Republican candidate for
ucation Committee in 1965-66. He "new social system struggling to state Attorney General in 1966.
is a member of the advisory com- be born."
HPue RM1l'na bli Stt C~hai

mittee to Flint Campus. He also
supported bringing University re-
sources into play to solve social
problems. He would expand Uni-
versity programs to help educate
urban children.
Lindemet's campaign stressed
the problems of "student unrest
and discipline," maintaining' the
University's standards of excell-
ence and financing.
Matthei's campaign emphasized
the need to maintain confidence
and enthusiasm in the University
community, providing quality low-
cost education to qualified stu-
dents, and "making student activ-
ism a constructive force for the
University."

E 'ie was epuoiican *, ,latie e iiair-
Mrs. Muncy, a graduate of the man and served on the Republican
University and a retired school National Committee from 1957-61,
teacher, emphasized that the and is currently Commissioner of
"greatest challenge to the Uni- the State Bar of Michigan.
versity is youth itself." In the race for two openings on
Mrs. Schiff also addressed her the Michigan State University
campaign to the question of the Board of Trustees, early returns
student role in decision-making had showed all four candidates
processes at the University. virtually even. However Demo-
Chester and Copi, both students crats Warren Huff an'd Mrs.
at the University, stressed the Blanche Martin were almost as-
'Universtity "should be responsive sured of election as urban Demo-
to those who actively engage in ratic votes were reported.
its operation, the students and Both Democrats had run on a
faculty." They would also de- platform which is highly critical
emphasize the policy-making role of MSU's ability-to-pay tuition
of the Regents. plan.
Lindemer, a graduate of the Their Republican opponents,
University Law school, is a former Richard Ernst and David Diehl,

4

Esch,

wins rem-election

to- Con~
(Continued from page 1)
Charles Chamberlain defeated
,James Harrison, former assistant
Democratic state chairman.
In the Eighth district, which
includes Saginaw, Republican in-
cumbent James Harvey defeated
Democratic challenger Richard
Davies.
Guy VanderJagt, Republican in-
cumbent in the ninth district,
which includes Traverse City and
western Michigan, easily defeat-
ed Democrat Jay Wabeke, a real
estate operator.,

rressional seat

feated his Republican challenger,
Eugene Beauregard, also a Negro.
In the Dearborn Heights-Allen
Park area, the state's 15th district,
incumbent Democrat William D.
Ford defeated Republican John
F. Boyle.
John Dingell, Democratic in-
cumbent in the 16th district which
includes Dearborn, defeated his
Republican challenger M o n t e
Bona, a University of Michigan
graduate student.

In the 17th district, which in-'
cludes northwestern Detroit, Mrs.
Martha Griffiths, the incumbent
Democrat, defeated Republican
Jack M. Siviter, an electrical en-
gineer.
In the Birmingham-Bloomfield
Hills area, -which comprises the
state's 18th district, incumbent
Republican William S. Broomfield
defeated a spirited challenge from
Detroit attorney Allen Zemmol,
the Democratic challenger.

aave supported student roles in de-
vision making.
Minor party votes in MSU's
caces were very small.
The two Wayne State Univer-
sity Board of Governors seats will
apparently be held by Democrats
George Edwards III and Augustus
-alloway, who had strongly favor-
ad improved WSU relations with
the Detroit community.
The Republican opponents, Vic-
,or Raviolo and Kurt Keydel, re-
tained very close third and fourth
>ositions.
Late returns for the two open-
ings in the State Board of Educa-
tion again show Democratic
strength. Incumbent Marilyn Jean
Kelly and newcomer Michael J.
Deeb held substantial leads though
these returns were among the last
to be counted.

'a.

IS

CAN
1,680
3,787
6,994
7,866
1,530
8,366
6,486
Roos
5,761
1,744,
7,141
6,952

t
I
f
I

Republican incumbent Elford
A. Cedarberg defeated attorney
Wayne Miller, the Democratic
district, which includes parts of
challenger in the state's 10th
northern and eastern Michigan.
Democratic incumbent James G.
O'Hara defeated his Republican
opponent Max Harris, in Macomb
County, the state's 12th district.
O'Hara mayhbe acandidate for
speaker of the House if the Dem-
ocrats regain control.
In inner-city Detroit, the state's
13th district, incumbent Democrat
Charles C. Diggs, a Negro, de-
Ist DISTRICT
X-CONYERS (D)
(unopposed)

(Continued from Page 1)
Humphrey, dropping in to tell
his supporters at a Minneapolis
hotel that he felt confident enough
to go to bed, added, "This is at
best as we put it a donnybrook-
anything can happen."
He said he didn't expect the
fial results from California to be
known until later today.
Although Nixon led in the elec-
toral college totals, he lacked the
270 vote majority needed to win
the presidency.

Sen. Edmund S. Muskie, Hum-
phrey's running mate, said 'in
Waterville, Maine, that "if it goes
to the House it will go to House
because the two leading candi-
dates are so close . . . The Wallace
vote isn't really as strong as we
thought it might be."
Richard M. Nixon returned to
his adopted New York from his
native California yesterday to
await the nation's verdict on his
second attempt in eight years to
become President of the United
States.I

HHH loses popular lead'

Nixon and ,his family landed at
Newark Airport in New Jersey,
then motored to New York City,
where the Republican candidate
will watch the returns.
George C. Wallace found conso-
lation in the strength of his pop-
ular vote for president even
though he was leading only in'a
few states-all in the Deep South.
Wallace watched the returns on
television with his family at their,
fashionable home in South Mont-
komery while well wishers waited
forlornly for him to show up at
an election party in a huge arena
more nearly emlpty than full.
The third party candidate's run-
ning mate, retired Gen. Curtis E.
LeMay, flew to Montgomery for
the climax of the campaign.
Surrounded by 27 relatives,
Sen. Edmund S. Muskie held a
family reunion last night as elec-
tion drew to a close.
The Democratic vice presidential
candidate talked with members of
his and his wife's families,

arney f
8,557 13th DISTRICT (94)
1,475 Stillwagon (R) 1588E
0,692 Winters D) 2058
4,777 A candidate's name in bold face
2,178 indicates that he has been elected.'
5,221 Figure in parentheses following
7,184 district is per cent of precints
4,612 reporting.
X-before a candidate's namej
denotes incumbent.
Returns are as of 4 a.m.

Retirns by States

4
$'

2nd DISTRICT (70)
X-Esch (R)
Vivian (D)
3rd DISTRICT (78)
X-Brown (R)
Keenan (D)
4th DISTRICT (64)
X-Hutchinson (R)
Martin (D)
5th DISTRICT (81)
X-Ford (R)
Howard (D)
6th DISTRICT (72)
X-Chamberlain (R)
Harrison (D)

atces move

make this Congress nearly a car-
bon copy of its predecessor.
Massachusetts Rep. John Mc-
Cormack, long-time majority lead-
er, handilydefeated Republican
candidate Alan C. Freeman.
And the Republican minority
leader, Rep. Gerald R. Ford of
Michigan beat Lawrence E. How-
ard, a Democrat.
In Missouri, Democrat James
W. Symington, son of Sen. Stuart
Symington, overcame his Repub-
lican opponent Hugh Scott.
Delms see-bu
in State L(
Three upset Democratic victor-
ies in Detroit districts have appar-
ently turned control of the state
House of Representatives over 'toI
the Democrats. Republicans had
held a one seat majority.
Pre-election predictions indi-
cated that Democrats were in
danger of losing nmore ground in
the house. Four House candidates,
three of them Republicans, were
unopposed. The predictions have
apparently not been borne out.
Democrats, who controlled the
chamber with nearly a two-thirds

t

to close split in 2 1 states
(Continued from page 1) victory over Democratic Lt. Gov. Rockefeller tallied 53,787 votes to
changed parties - and New John J. Daley. Davis, a life insur- Crank's 49,215.
Hampshire and Vernont moved ance executive, will be the first Montana's Republican Gov. Tim
to the Republican camp. The Re- Republican in the Vermont gov- Babcock lost his bid for re-elec-
toutheRepublicancmp.he Reg-o ernorship in six years. tion as Forrest H. Anderson, a
publican wins accompanied a good In New Hampshire, Republican tionDemorrndstH.Atestorney-
ticket within the prstress-dsvs Democrat and states attorney-
showing by the Nixon-Agnew Walter R. Petersen, speaker of the general won an early commanding
Deane C. Davis won a healthy state legislature, took an early lead.
lead over Emile Bussiere. Peter-
sen decide to run for governor Babcock argued that the state
after Gov. John W. King made needed a three per cent sales tax
a bid for. a Senate seat. to raise $60 million to meet addi-
The, New Hampshire race cen- tional expenses. Anderson opposed
tered over the issue of a state the idea.
sales or income tax. Republican However, as of 3 a.m., six of the
Ssl a tu r e Peterson endorse the plan for 21 gubernatorial contests remain
higher taxes, while Bussiere pledg- toss-ups.
ed to veto any tax measures in- I
tinued encouragement of seeking itiated by the GOP-dominat- In Indiana, GOP Secretary of
local solutions to urban and me- ed legislature. gState Edgar D. Whitcomb was
tropolitan problems. Incumbent Gov. John Crafee's edging out Democratic Lt. Gkt.
His Democratic opponent was defeat to Democrat Frank Licht Robert L. Rock 841,530 to 751,286 .
George W. Sallade who cam- was one of the election surprises. Rock is trying to succeed Gov.
paigned for increased state respon- With all the returns in, Chafee Roger D. Branigan, barred by law
sibility for school financing, and trailed Licht by a 20,000 vote mar- from succeeding himself in the
advocated an increased role forI gin.,etfu-ertr.Tecm
the state in seeking solutions to In the Delaware race, the Re- paign centered on the possibility
problems plaguing metropolitan uof a tax hike in Indiana next year;
~brbles lagi~n mtroolianpublicans won their third seat both candidates ended up op-
areas. Among the problems he from the Democrats as Russell W.pothngandise d
singled out were the "lack of Peterson defeated incumbent posg a raise.
proper recreational facilities, rapid Charles L. Terry. Democrat Terry With only a fraction of the vote
mass transportation, aid to the lead in early returns, but with tallied, Republican Robert D. Ray,

7th DISTRICT (49)
X-Riegle (R)
Blue (D)
8th DISTRICT (46)
X-HARVEY (R)
Davis (D)
9th DISTRICT (43)
X-VanderJagt (R)
I TY,..t..1...%l

f

69,523
60,519
86,370
47,732
67,507
36,693
80,886
52,412
74,372
47,195
54,013
35,448
55,555
29,273
58,871
29,570
47,612
28,206
24,870
16,728
107,605
45,653
29,733
6,077
76,439
52,131
99,356
39,378

e
K

Wabeke (D)

10th DISTRICT (37)
X-Cedarberg (R)
Miller (D)
11th DISTRICT (27)
X-Ruppe (R)
Clevenger (D)
12th DISTRICT (80)
X_(~r (T'H

ALA.'
ALAS.
ARIZ.
ARK.
CAL.
COL.
CONN.
DEL.
D.C.
FLA.
GA.
HAW.
IA.
ILL.
IND.
IOWA
KAN.
KY.
LA.
ME.
MD.
MASS.
MICH.
MINN.
MISS.
MO.
MON.
NEB.
NEV.
N. H.
N. J.
N. M.
N. Y.
N. CAR

POPULAR VOTE

Electoral
Vote'

z
84
98
60
7
26
31
95
100
100
99
66
0
51
62
75
68
71
93
93,
56
98
35
75
69
94
91
39
35
57
62
82
77
80
90
62
76
90
62
90
69

138,722-14
16,838-50
105,653-33
8,860-31
703,343-46
311,865-41
615,844-50
88,119-42
136,452-82
663,804-32
213,296-26
0- 0
36,812-31
1,215,341-46
651,862-39
323,651-42
219,417-35
357,094-38
286,289-29
83,783-57
512,830-43
444,706-69
569,988-55
624,166-54
137,787-23
66'1,488-45
47,976-46
444,706-69
96,723-34
56,024-43
1,027,388-45
106,434-40
2,792 ,925-52
411,794-29
52,601-39
1,275,930-42
265,114-33
169,785-42
1,971,460-47
162,436-64

137,981-14
13,470-40
181,415-57
8,668-30
723,178-47
380,920-51
546,774-44
95,686-45
29,617-18
785,385-40
227,961-28
0-0
67,598-56
1,221,233-46
842,656-50
396,225-52
338,374-54
410,971-44
225,125-23
61,903-42
495,581-42
173,060-27
425,251-41
478,966-42
83,377-14
644,655-43
50,475-48
173,060-27
165,138-57
69,461-53
1,063,941-46
136,272-52
2,222,931-42
560,184-40
73,962-55
1,381,596-46
373,933-47
210,232-52
1,858,782-45
79,664-32

624,963-66
3,367-10
28,984- 9
11,067-39
116,629- 7
6,331- 1
74,431- 6
27,608-13
0- 0
552,574-28
368,288-45
0- 0
15,495-13
220,747- 8
189,480-11
650- 0
63,962-10
174,865-18
483,403-49
2,510- 2
175,789-15
30,268- 5
43,181- 0
48,381- 4
383,585-63
165,092-11
6,412- 6
30,268- 5
25,877- 9
4,801- 4
207,272- 9
20,883- 8,
266,031- 5
438,978-31
7,771- 6
356,703-12
162,887-20
27,747- 7
324,068- 8
10,375- 4

t
t

z

:
,
a
s° 3

0 0
3 0
0 5
0 0
0 ,40
0 6
8 0
0 3
3 0
0 14
0 0
0 0
0 4
0 26
0 13
0 9
0 7
0 9
0
4 0
10 0
14 0
10 0
10 0
0 0
12 0
0 4
14 0
0 5
0 4
0 17
0 4
43 0
0 13
0 4
0 26
0 8
0 6
29 '0
4 0

w
c
a
a
... i

I

T11
10 , ee begins
0
probe of
0
0sheriff 5
0
0 (Continued from page 1)
0 with a so-called "Safety Guide,"
12 the jail commissary and county
0 extradition trips.
0 Harvey replied to some of the
0 questions, but the special commit-
0 tee termed his answers "highly
0 unsatisfactory." On Oct. 22 the
0 supervisors voted to maintain a
0 continuing audit of Harvey's de-
10 partment, tightening their con-
trol over the Sheriff's Department.
0 But the supervisors refused to
0 take any other action and sent
0 their findings to the three circuit
0 judges.
0 The supervisors questioned Har-
7 vey's use of funds in extraditing
0 prisoners, specifically requesting
0 any receipts or expense accounts.
0 Harvey claimed no such files re-
0 mained, and the supervisors thus
0 claimed they were without any
0 basic information with which to
0 deterimne whether anything ex-
0 tra-legal occurred.
0 The supervisorsalso questioned
O Harvey's publication of a Safety,
0 Guide. They directly asked t h e
0 sheriff whether he had "diverted
0 any monies from the so-called
0 Safety Guide . . . to your personal
0 use?"
0 Harvey replied, "No." But sev-
cv Pal jin-v. latpr toldn. rei aa

A -v ara (D)
Harris (R)
13th DISTRICT
X-Diggs (D)
Beauregard (R)
f 14th DISTRICT
X-Nedzi (D)
O'Rourke (R)
15th DISTRICT
X-W. Ford (D)
Boyle (R)
. 16th DISTRICT
X-Dingell (D)
yBona (R)
17th DISTRICT
X-Griffiths (D)
Siviter (R)
18th DISTRICT

(37)
(77)
(96)
(50)

I

53,502 N. DAK
15,587,OHIO
(90) OKLA
105,461 ORE.
34,919 PENN.
(77) R. I.

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan