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November 06, 1968 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-06

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WednpsAnx, a mhnr 6'196

* G47I jL-,Zjl iyl I'IVYCf I ItJWl V, f :7VQ..

J E

LEAD DISCUSSION
Strikers march into

+F:i 'A IS bert Kastenbaum, Dept. of Psychology,
WSU. on "The Fireshortened Life Per-
spective of the Aged Person". Wednes-
da :5p.m. Campus News, produced
BULLETIN by speech department students. 5:00
p.m. The Press and World Affairs, with
:::.,."..>Prof. Ben Yablonky.

1

Ad

Bldgi.

By STEVE ANZALONE
and GEOFFREY STEVENS
The SDS student strike came to
i climax yesterday as about 200
persons marched into the Admin-
istration Bldg. and conducted a
three-hour political discussion.
The discussion on the second
floor did not develop into either
a sit-in or a seizure of the build-
ing.
The group voted not to continue
occupation of the building at
about 4:45 p.m. SDS member Jim
Mellen said emphatically "we
are leaving because we have not
undertaken a campaign on a cer-
tain set of issues that we are going
to win on in the future."
Mellen added "we feel a lot of
people on campus are digging the
things we stand for but are not
At turned on to politics. We feel
they will by the end of the year."
The entire group voiced approv-
il of Mellen's statement and vot-
ed to leave together as a group.
They marched out of the building
to the Diag where they dispersed.
The discussion in the building
capped the activities of the second
day' of the SDS sponsored strike
that was called to protest the elec-
tion, the war, and the University's
complicity with the war.
The march was brought to the
Administration Bldg "because our
fight is with the University and
we wanted to bring it all back
home," Mellon said.
President Robben Fleming,
whose office adjoins the lobby, was
not in the building during the
meeting. Fleming later declined
to comment on today's activities
because he was not present.
The march was led by a hearse
to the Administration Bldg. where
a coffin was deposited on the first
floor of the building. The coffin
symbolized the death of the two
party system.
The group decided to enter the
building, deposit the coffin and
decorate the building with black
crepe paper. Mellen said before
entering, "The nation, which has
an election today, is going to have
an upheaval." He then cited the
protests at different cities and
campuses across the country.
. The group entered the building
with a set of demands that includ-
ed: student control of finances
and curriculum, an end to all war
research, an end to all entrance
and distribution requirements, an
end to University investment in
companies dealing with the De-
fense Dept.
The day's activities were or-
ganized at a noon rally on the
Diag. The rally included guer-

rilla theater skits, and speeches
in support of the strike and the
efforts of New Politics Party. At-
;empts to disrupt the rally were
made by students chanting, "Go
Blue."
Despite these attempts to dis-
rupt the rally, most of the 800
students at the rally watched the
activities and many joined in the
singing.
About 400 people then proceeded
to the party campaign headquar-
ters and the County Bldg., chant-
ing slogans in defiance of the war
and the election.
The marchers placed "death
notices" at the headquarters of
the Democratic party and Repub-
lican Congressman Marvin Esch's
district office in downtown Ann
Arbor. The notices read:
"We do hereby declare the Re-
publican (Democratic) party dead
of natural causes after a long ill-
ness. We deeply mourn the pass-
ing of what was once a healthy
young idea. The contradictions of
capitalism, racism,, and imperial-
ism were too great. Signed, The
People."G
After visiting the County Bldg.
where a death certificate was
posted proclaiming the death of
the American electoral system the
march went to the Administration
Bldg.
At the Administration Bldg., the
group situated themselves on the
second floor. They then discussed
whether the news media should be
allowed to stay. The news media
was permitted to stay.
The discussion then turned to
political issues. Several suggestions
were made concerning the direc-
tion of the movement after the
strike. Mention was made of a
rent strike and making further
demands that the University sell
its financial interest in Dow
Chemical Co.
The group; voted not to con-
tinue occupation of the building
at this time. They said they would
continue the fight after a further
discussion of a set of demands at
a later SDS meeting.
Today's march was part of a
two-day strike conducted by SDS.
A student boycott of classes failed
to draw a significant number out
of classes. Attendance was large
at the other events, including as
many as 2,000 persons at a rally
Monday night at President Flem-
ing's house.
Second ciass postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan. 48104.
Daily except Monday, during regular
academic school year.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Dailyaassumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3528 L.S.&A. Bldg. before 2
p.m. of the day preceding publi-
cation and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. General No-
tices may be published a maximum
of two times on request; Day Cal-
endar items appear only once. Stu-
dent organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6
Day Calendar
Anatomy Seminar: William E. Burkel,
Department of Anatomy, "Terminations
of the Hepa tic. Artery": 2501 E a s t
Medical Buildng, 1:10 p.m.
Zoology Seminar: Dr. R. A. Flickinger,
Professor of Biology, State University of
New York at Buffalo, "Relationship of
Cell Division to Differentiation in Frog
Embryos", 1400 Chemistry, 4:00 p.m.
Student Laboratory Theatre Program:
(Department of Speech): Megan Terry's
Keep Tightly Closed in a Cool Dry Place
and Ex-Miss Copper Queen on a Set of
Pills: Arena Theater, Frieze Building,
4:10 p.m.
General Notices
Botany Seminar: Dr. Peter B. Kauf-
man, Dept. of Botany will speak on
"Ultrastructure of Stomate Develop-
ment in Avena", Thursday, November 7,
1968 at 4:15, 1139 Nat. Scl. Bldg.
Freshmen who have received notice of
appointments to confer with representa-
tives of their high schools on Thursday
morning are urged to be punctual.
Graduate Record Examination: Appli-
cation blanks are available in Room
3014, Rackham Building for the Grad-
uate Record Examination. The next ad-
ministration of the test will be on
Saturday, December 14, and appalica-
tions are due in Princeton, New Jersey
before November 19.
Broadcasting Service: WUOM Radio
(91.7 Mc.) 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily.
Wednesday 11:00 a.m. The Eleventh
Hour (repeated at 7 p.m.) Ed Burrows
hosts an hour of news and conversation
Prof. Paul Grigaut discussing "The Art
of Art Collecting." Wednesday, 1:00
p.m. U-M Conference on Aging - Ro-

Thursday 1:00 p.m. U.S. Foreign Pol-
icy: The Next Decade - "Within the
World Economy", with Richard Gard-
ner, Columbia U. 4:45 p.m. Conservation
Report, with rPof. Karl Lagler. 5:15 p.m.
U-M Feature Story with Jack Hamilton.
Doctoral
Exainaioqs}I
June LaVonne Triplett, Education,
Dissertation: "Characteristics and Per-
ceptions of Low-Income Women as
They Affect Use of Preventive Health
Services," on Wednesday, November 6
at 10 a.m. at 4209 U.H.S. Chairman Allen
Menlo.
William James McLaughlin, Philoso-
phy, Dissertation: Analogy and Other
Minds," at p.m., Wednesday, November
6 in Room 2223 Angell Hall, Chairman:
>A. S. Kaufman.
Henry Joseph Bourguignon, History,
Dissertation: "The First Federal Court:
The History of the Continental Con-
gress' Committees on Appeal and Its
Court of Appeals in Cases of Capture,
1775-1787." on Wednesday, Nov. 6 at 2:30
p.m. at 3609 Haven Hall, Chairman: W.
R. Leslie.
Placement
3200 S.A.B.
GENERAL DIVISION
Placement Interviews: The following
organizations will interview at Place-
ment Services, the representatives ex-
pect to see at least a vita sheet on in-
terviewees, therefore, if you are not
already registered with the General
Division, please stop in and let us pro-
vide y ou with the proper materials.
Please call 763-1363 to make appoint-
ments by phone, or stop in and make
appt. in person. Make appts. as soon
as possible, none accepted after 4 p.m.
day preceding visit.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1968
Cornell School of Industrial and La-
bor Relations, Ithica, N.Y.: All day, men
and women. All degrees interested in
graduate study in this area.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1968
Center for Naval Analysis, Arlington,
Va.: All day, men and women. PhD only
in Chen., Econ., Math and Physics for
Operations Research and Systems An-
alysis.
Atlas Chemical Industries, Inc., Wil-
mington, Del.: Men and women, all day.
Bach. and Masters degrees in Gen.
Anal., Organ., and Physical Chemistry

for Mgmt. Trng. Production, Inside and
Territorial Sales, Product Research
Dev.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1968
Prudential Insurance Company, Na-
tionw de: All day, men and women. All
degrees interested in insurance.
The Travelers Insurance Company,
Detroit Office: All day, men only. Bach
in Gen. Chem., Econ., Gen. Lib. Arts,
Math, and Poll. Set., for Data Process-
ing, Insurance, Claims and home office
and Sales.
Neiman - Marcus, Dallas, Texas: All
day, men and women. All degrees in-
terested in Mgmt. Trng and merchan-
dising.
Opportunities for Further Study, Fin-
ancial Aid, Work Study Programs, and
other information. Please contact the
Placement Service for further informa-
tion and/or applications. These an-
nouncements are on file in the Career
Planning Library area.
Mt. Sinai Hospital of Cleveland offers
Summer Scholarship Program for Stu-
dents interested in Personnel, Research
Areas, Dietitics, and Laboratories work
in hospitals. Stipend for 10 week pro-
gram of 60% duties, and 40% own pro-
ject.
Public Administration Internships
with State of New York offered to stu-!
dents with MA in Public. Admin,,
Govn't., Poli. Set., or Public Affairs, or
Law, to provide practical experience pre-
paring for advancement to top-level
responsibility. Intern given work as-
signments, on-the-job trng., seminars,
and some tuition reimbursement pro-
grams.
Careers for College Graduates in New
oYrk State Government booklet now at
our office. Complete listing of areas of

work, benefits, and application proced-
ures.
SiMFR PLACEMENT
SERVICE
21? S.A.B., Lower Level
Department Of The Interior, An-
chorage. Alaska: Fire Control, S m o k e
Jumper, and surveying aid applic. ac-
cepted from now through Jan. 1.
Federal Jobs. applications for n e x t
test, on Dec. 6, is due, TODAY, Nov. 6.
Applic. at SPS
General Electric Co., Chicago Heights,
Ill.: Assembly line work for mnen from
Dec. 6 to Jan. 9. God pay, must live
in south-suburb Chicago.
TEACHER PLAONMENT
The following schools have listed va-
cansies for now or January.
Dundee, Mich.-Jr. High: English, Ind.
Arts (Gen. Shop Auto). Elem.: Spec. Ed.
Type A. Sr. High: Speech 'English,
Wrestling Coach.
Grand Rapids, Mich.-6-8: (All Se-
cond Semester) Shop Teacher, Remed.
Reading, Guidance Counselor. 6: Eng-
lish, Reading. 8: Phys. Science. Elem.:
Phys. Educ. Jr. High: Remned. Reading.
For further information contact the
Placement Services, 300 S.A.B. 764-
7459.
PLACEMENT SERVICES
EDUCATION DIVISION
The following schools will send repre-
sentatives to the Placement Services of-
fice to interview prospective teachers.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 11
Dearborn Heights, Mich.: Elem.: K-6.
Sec.: Math, Earth Sci (Must have 5
hrs.)
Garden City. Mich.: Elem., J. High
Ind.. Arts. High Sch. Ind. Arts, Coun-
selor Sci. Teacher needed now.
Menominee, Mich.: Elem., K-6, Instr.
(Continued on Page 6)

0

'--Next-
BARBARELLA

SHOWS
AT
7:10 & 9:20
1-3-5
FOURTH
'WEEK

+

-Daily-Jay Cassidy
Strikers discuss tactics

100 ARRESTS:
Election day protest
below expectations

F

'El
2452 E. Stadium at Washtenaw
Ann Arbor
DIAL 663-8800

r er
G art is aRT'9Lone 7&Hite
W eSTARTS TOMORROW-7:00 & 006

I

From Wire Service Reports
National Park Police arrested
nearly 100 persons yesterday at an
SDS sponsored demonstration
across from the White House. No
arrests were reported. at other ral-
lies held throughout the country
as part of a nationwide protest of
the elections.
While there were scattered in-
cidents elsewhere in the country,
they had fallen short of the large
scale massive protests mapped in
advance of the election.
SDS had promised daylong de-
nonstrations by thousands of stu-
dents across the country, includ-
ing gatherings at Richard Nixon's,
New York headquarters and a
draft card burning at Hubert.
Humphrey's home in Waverly,
Minn.
In Washington, National P a r k
Police arrested the protestors for
demonstrating without a permit
shortly after they arrived at La-
fayette Park across from the
White House. On the way to the
park, Washington, D.C. police ar-
rested about a dozen people as
they crossed Constitution Ave.
Maj; George Wright of the Na-
tional Park Police said the arrests
were made because the protestors
were "parading around, m a k i n g
speeches, using a loud speaker and
things like that," in violation of
Park Service regulations.
The march to the park followed
a rally yesterday afternoon in
which 300 people gathered at the
Lincoln Memorial to discuss the;
electoral process. Police with riot
helmets and gas masks followed
the demonstrators along their
route.
In Newark, N.J., about 50 elec-
tion day protestors clashed brief-
ly with counterpickets. Police
swung clubs to break up the melee.
The demonstration began near
the. downtown headquarters f o r
Republican Candidates Nixon and
Agnew. Students from a communi-
ty college near the main down-
town street taunted the protesters
along their route

Police had managed to keep the
opposing groups apart until the
demonstration neared the Ne-
wark federal buildings. A number
of clashes between the protestors
then occurred. No arrests w e r e
made.
Sen. Edmund Muskie went to
the Waterville, Maine, polls while
demonstrators chanted "free elec-
tions now."
About 175 college students from
the area shouted and waved signs
reading "Choice????" Muskie said
the demonstration did not dis-
turb him.
New York City police contained
about 500 demonstrators at an
SDS-sponsored rally in U n i o n
Square. There were no incidents.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
...........
UM Chess Club, Nov. 6th, 7:30 p.m., 3D
Union, weekly meeting.
* * * *
Physical Therapy Club, Wed., Nov.
6th, 7:30 p.m., Univ. Hospital Gym, 3rd
Floor, rMs. Alice Johnson, P. T. will
demonstrate the use of the gym in
rehabilitation.
* * * *.
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw. Midweek Service on Weds.,
Nov. 6th at 10:00 p.m. Fellowship follows
at 10:30 p.m.
"Seek and You Shall Received", Find
- U of $M Tutorial Project Bucket Drives
on campus Friday. Nov. 8th and Sat.,
Nov. 9th. "Giveand you Shall Support"
over 300 students giving their experience
to improve community education.
UM Scottish Country Dance Society.
Dance meeting Weds., 8:00 to 10:30 p.m.
W.A.B. lounge. Instruction given. Be-
ginners welcome.
Students For Education Innovation,
Urban Education Committee meeting,
Weds., Nov. 6th 8:00 p.m. Guild House,
802 Monroe St. Subject: planning for
student initiated Urban Teacher Course.
** * * *
Baha'i "Student GrouI , Nov. 8th, 8:00
p.m. 520 N. Ashley, "The Rise and Fall
of White America". Please come to find
out what we mean!

NEW HOURS Daily6:30 AM to 10 PM. Till 1:00 AM Fri. & Sat. Night
Now serving Mediterranean Cuisine
featuring
Chef Theodoros from Athens

.

I

" RZARUZ is one
of the great films of
Bunuel's career....-.
And made me remember some-
thing Bunuel once said:, 'To
show with a cold white eye what
they have done here on erth in
the name of God."'
-Penelope Gilian, The New Yor er
"STUNNING-A movie that really glows
..the thing for you to sees"
-Judith Crisi, Todey Shew, WNSC
"An amazingly strong film with ear-
marks of a classic. It should endure as
one of his best, most significant works.
An exceptional film to savor more than
once." -William wif, cu.

FEROCIOUS
SATIRE... A
MUST SEE
TOP GRADE
PICTURE!"
-David 0l n,
Wco$

__________ :1

FREE ENTERTAINMENT
Featuring the SIX OF SPADES
Come to
LITTLE CLUB:

FRI., NOV. 8
at the Michigan League

9-12

_ {

i

TONIGHT & EVERY WEDNESDAY of
A HOOT
an evening of endless musical variety
come and do your thing or sing-a-long
THURSDAY-
ROGER CRAIG-State Senator
speaking on -"Law and Order Clamp-Down in
the Legislature." Also commentary on:the
ELECTION

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M

Featuring the
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN BANDS
-10th
GUEST XYLOPHONE SOLOIST JOHN HENEY
Formerly of the Sousa Band
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16
8:00 P.M. HILL AUDITORIUM
ALL SEATS RESERVED. TICKETS $2.00-$1.50
General Sales begin MONDAY, November 11, 9:00-4:00 at
Hill Auditorium Box Office and continue daily thru showtime.
Mail orders of 10 or more will be accepted by writing to
Bandorama, Michigan Bands School of Music, North Campus,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105. Orders must be accompanied by
check or money order with self-addressed stamped envelope.
No orders accepted after Nov. 9.

"More Bunuel than 'Selle de Jour*...
Bunuel is one of the most audacious, .
single minded and creative directors it
thehistoryof thecinema." -N.Y. Times
"The enormous power of NAZARIN will
leave you limp... it shouldn't be missed
by any lover of fine cinema art."
.Frnces Taylor, tongsond Press
"o one interested in cinema today,
can afford to miss it... a starkly, sim-
pie,,beautiful parable, which is visually,
e Goya etching."
-Bernard L' Drew, Hardord Times
LUIS BUNUEL'S

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GRAND dncedb Lis nu6~. photography by gabriel figueroa,
CANNES produced by mar~-!h r-rharharlo non~ce
INTER'NA THiN Al

FRIDAY-
JUDY SUCCOP-
singing blues, ballads and folk music, accompanied by guitar
SATURDAY-
WALDEN TWO-,
singing folk and folk-rock music and playing BASSANOVA
guitar instrumentals
Order -Your Dai ly Now-

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with classic featurette
"TH E ANDALUSIAN DOG"
by Luis Bunuel and Salvador Dali

t
/ O g1 1 Y i l 1

II

I

ROD STEIGER in
"THE PANBROER"
One showing at 8 P.M. on
THURSDAY NIGHT, November 7
Seating Capacity: 250 Admission: 50c
HILLEL, 1429 Hill St.

MONDAY
MO RNING?
Yes

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THIS IS
THE TRUE STORY
OF THE
SELF-CONFESSED

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