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November 03, 1968 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-03

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Sunday, November 3, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Paae Nino

Sunday, November 3, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Yrr +rn.w r n nr r

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THE NATIONAL SCENE

Jayhawks

corral

Buffaloes,

LAWRENCE, Kan. - John Rig- gins gaining 162 of it and Do}- Army outscored Penn State in
gins and Bob Douglass ate up glass 108. iThe Jayhawk rushig the final quarter 17-12, but earlier
huge chunks of yardage with their yardage wasthe most ever against scores by the Nittany Lions and a
slashing running Saturday. lead- Colorado, breaking the mark of 53-yard kickoff return for the
ing third-ranked Kansas to a 27- 421 set by Missouri earlier this Lion's final score after Army had
14 victory over Colorado. season when the Tigers beat the narrowed the margin to five

Kansas put tight _ defensive Buffs Dy the same score.
clamps on Bob Anderson the Big Riggins exploded for 63 yards
Eight total offense leader who had on the game's third; play to set up
been averaging 220 yards a game. Bill Bell's 20-yard field goal. Bell
He didn't get plus yardage until later booted a 38-yard field goal,
midway through the third quarter. the longest of his career and giv-
At one point, after 22 plays, An- ing him nine for a Jayhawk
derson had minus one yard in the school record.
middle of the third period.*
Anderson finished with only 32 Cadets killed
yards total offense, his lowest total UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -
in his collegiate career. Penn State withstood a fourth-
Kansas, meanwhile, r i p p e d quarter Army rally Saturday to
through Colorado's defense for score a 28-24 football victory be-
428 yards rushing, with John Rig- fore a crowd of 49,122.
Michiaan dTops two
in water poio tourey

points clinched it.

Penn State built a 9-7 halftime
lead on Campbell's nine-yard
touchdown run and a safety when
Army's Charley Jarvis downed the
ball in his own end zone after a
bad pass from center. A 15-yard
pass from Steve Lindell to Lynn
Moore in the second period gave
Army its first score.
In the third period, Penn State's
Charlie Pittman drove one yard
for a TD, only to see Army come
back for three points on a 30-
yard field goal by Arden Jensen
in the opening minutes of the
final ,period.
With the Lions ahead only 16-
10, Penn State added a score on
Campbell's qne-yard plunge, but
Army came right back, covering
67 yards in five plays with Jarvis
covering the final yard.
Army tried a short kick, but
Ted Kwalick picked it up and
ran 53 yards. to score for the
clincher, although Army got an-
other TD shot with Lindell pass-
ing eight yards to Gary Steele.
Yellow Jackets tie
ATHENS, Ga. - Cool Jim
McCullough kicked a 38-yard,
field goal with 12 seconds left
Saturday to cap a Georgia come-
back and give the seventh-ranked

Bulldogs a 10-10 tie with Houston
which had threatened an inter-+
sectional football runaway behind1
the explosive birsts of Paul Gip-+
son.
The 205-pound Houston full-
back sliced through Georgia's+
startled defenders for 224 yards
and allowed the Cougars to dom-
inate play until the fourth quar-
ter when Georgia scored all of its
points.{ behind sophomore quar-
terback Mike Cavan.
The Bulldog signal-caller tossed'
a seven-yard touchdown strike to
.Brad Johnson with 11 minutes
remaining and then sent the Geor-
gia team on its tying drive with
1:59 to play.
Starting from the Georgia nine,
Cavan hit on passes of 21, 7 and
14 yards and ran once for 27 more,
setting up McCullough's clutch
field goal.
Gipson never scored,, but he set
a Houston endurance record with
36 carries in the game. He gained
168 yards in the first half and
added 56 more in the last two per-
iods.+
He set up Terry Leiweke's 32-
yard field goal in the first quar-
ter and minutes later Ken Bailey
tosednan 80-yard touchodown pass
to Elmo Wright for 10-0 Houston
lead.
SMU shinned
AUSTIN, Tex. - The Univer-
sity of Texas blasted Southern

Methodist University 38-7 Satur-
day with a murderous rushing at-
tack and a scratching ball-stealing_
defense.
Chris .Gilbert, Ted Key and
Steve Worster repeatedly gouged
out huge chunks of yardage
through the SMU line, and the
Texas defense pounded Mustang
quarterback Chuck Hixson into
hurried passes that were inter-
cepted.
Twice they raked the ball out
of Hixon's hands for fumbles and

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Texas ran up 547 yards in total ' MENT 761-3548
offense, 380 of It on the ground. MET
Gilbert ran for 145 yards on 18
carries, the 15th time he has
rushed for more than 100 yards c" Obf
a game in three years.
The victory put Texas in a tie
with SMU, Arkansas and Texas Ot
Tech for the conference lead with -
3-1 records.
Texas is - 5-1-1 for the season
and SMU is 5-2.

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By ROD ROBERT
Special To The DailyI
BLOOMINGTON - aMichigan
AN lost its final two games at the I
Indiana Invitational Water Polo
Tournament yesterday, but con-:
sidering the fact that it was the'
only school represented that does
not have water polo as a varsity1
sport, the team made a very re-1
spectable showing.1
- Indiana, led by Dan Casey, voted!
the tourney's most valuable player,
captured the crown with a 13-81
victory over Loyola.
In theq preceding game, West-!
ern Illinois fought off a last-period
Michigan rally, i hanging on des-
perately for a 17-16 victory.
Going into the final period, WI
led 14-9, as they got the upper

hand by scoring mostly on break-!
aways. Four goals by Mike Allen,I
and one by Greg Zann kept Mich-
igan in the game.
With 1:06 left and the score 17-
14, the game seemed out of reach.
Yet Allen and Charlie Burback
scored back-to-back tallies in the
next forty seconds. Unfortunately,
time ended before Michigan could
get off another shot.
Earlier in the day, Loyola
showed Michigan why they were
Midwest water polo champs last
year. The' Wolverines couldn't
cover the Chicago team's well-
drilled offense 'and fell 24-7.
Mike Allen again showed his
polo prowess as he tallied four
goals. Altogether he scored 20
times during the tournament.

Doyle Novarre
Phone 426-4030

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GEORGEWAlilI SALLADE
STATE REPRE SENTATIVE
Democrat

Let me tell you why I want to be President.
I want to be President because the world has become
too small and atomic bombs have become too big for any
more war.
I want to put an end to the nuclear arms race before
the arms race puts an end to the human race.
I want to use the full powers of the Presidency to
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I want to be President because the United States, more
than any nation on earth, can help build a strong United
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lions of dollars for making a better life for all men.
I want to be President because I want to end the war
in Vietnam-and end it right away without further loss
of life to Americans or Vietnamese. I emphasize a halt in
the bombing as an acceptable risk for peace. I call for a
reciprocal cease-fire. I want to get on with the business of
making peace. I want to make possible the removal of all
foreign forces. I want to build a secure and stable Viet-
nam in which the people will be able to have a govern-
ment of their own choosing. I want to bring our men and
resources back home where they are so badly needed.
I want to be President because I believe in the young
people of this country. I want them to have a larger share
in the decisions that directly concern them. They have
something to say to us. We have the obligation to listen.
I want them to know the joys of building a meaningful
UIIDEDT U

life and to have a full part in the building of a better
America.
I want to be President because I believe in one class
of citizenship-not at some distant date, but now. This
means jobs. It means housing. It means doctors and hospi-
tals for those who need them.
I want to be President because I believe the Federal
government has a necessary role to play in helping to
build better schools and in helping to provide the fnest
education opportunities for all our young people.
I want to be President because I want to provide law
and order without creating a police state in order to do it.
I want to be President because I want to be able to
deal with the basic causes of social unrest that lead to
social protest.
I want to be President because this nation will tear
itself to pieces unless we see the difference between crime
and social protest. Both lead to violence. I will not toler-
ate crime. But neither will I tolerate the conditions of
squalor and wretchedness that lead to social unrest and
social protest.
Finally, I want to be President because I think we
have everything we need in this country for the greatest
advance in the well-being of the American people this
nation has ever known.
And I want to be President because no nation is in a
better position to help make a better life on earth under
peace for all men.

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