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November 02, 1968 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-02

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I I

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday. November 2, 1968

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

_, ...,.... 7 ,,..,R. ..., ...N .. .....
+. ..

..

Jay hawks seek Buffalo

hl'* e

PRAISES GIBSON:
McLain modest Young winner"

By JIM FORRESTER
Hey there, sports fans! Brace
yourselves for another fantastic
Saturday as the nation's collegiate
youth prepare themselves for those
modern Arthurian tilts known as
football games.
This week's game of the cen-
tury is the joust between the Buf-
faloes of Colorado and the Kan-
sas Jayhawks. The Buffalos have
won four games in the current
campaign and have been "chip-'
ped" but twice - by California
(remember them?) and number-
ten ranked Missouri.
Winning, though, was Colorado's
way last weekend as the Buffaloes
stampeded tough Oklahoma in a
41-27 upset.
Colorado sports the Big Eight's
leading offensive player in quar-
terback Bob Anderson. Anderson
ran for three touchdowns in a
KENSINGTON MARKET
They assembled in Toronto, the
five best rock-men in Canada
..,recorded in Manhattan, in a
prestigious series of sessions...
proving the cream of Canada
to be a very heady brew.

single-handed stomp of th
ers.
On the season, the CU
caller has tossed for 863
and six touchdowns while
up another 455 yards +
ground.
The targets for the A

BOB ANDERSON (11),
Buffalo hope for an 'uns
rence. Anderson leads th
is what he will need to t
of 45.2.

e Soon- aerials have been ends M o n t e feat of the season. Kansas is the
Huber and Mike Pruett. Huber has class of the conference and holds
r signal caught 24 passes thus far in the down the number three spot in the
3 yards campaign, nine of which came in national ranking to boot.
eating the losing cause to California. KU quarterback Bob Douglass
on the But for all the hoopla surround- is nearly as spectacular as Ander-
ing Anderson, Colorado will more son as he has passed for 734 yards
nderson than likely suffer their third de- and eight touchdowns without an
interception.
The running game, though, is
where Kansas does the most dam-
age. Jayhawk ballcarriers have
combined to average just over 300
yards per game on the ground.
Far and away their most dan-
gerous rusher is little Don Shank-
line. The Senior halfback stands
5'9" and is a featherweight foot-
baller at 177 pounds but runs at
... .the phenomenal clip of 7.8 yards
"on each carry.
The afternoon looks long for
Colorado, who has been less than
stingy with its rushing , defense
giving up more than 200 yards in
every game. To top all this off
Kansas has scored more points
this year than any other team in
the nation, piling up 271 in six
contests.
It looks like Buffalo steaks for
Kansas and cips for the boys
from Boulder.
Penn State meets its toughest
COLORADO QUARTERBACK, is the challenge to date as it goes against
et over Kansas in today's game at Law- Army at UniversityPuperby bN-
he Big Eight in total offense, but points anced attack that features the
op the Jayhawk's nation leading average running of halfback Charlie Pitt-
man and fullback Tom Cherry.
But the pasing game makes the
offense go and tight end T e d
Kwalick makes the passing go.
Kwalick's statistics are not im-
pressive - he has caught only
A io -i 16 passes for one touchdown in
the season's first five games.
But Kwalick is so good that
two, often three men have to fol-
low him every place he goes. This
allows quarterback Chuck Burk-
hart to either throw to someone
else or run the ball to where those
three men following Kwalick are
supposed to be.
EETING S The Army, on the other hand,
has offense also. They socked it to
Duke last week for 57 points in
Nov. 4 7:30 P.M. probably their finest performance
i' of the year. Steve Lindell is one
of the better field generals in the
B rEast and Charley Jarvis is pro-
on Ballroom bably the best fullback in that part
of the country.
The Cadets may pull an upset
~today and Eldridge Cleaver may
t3 hzmfa~.. ;......pull one next Tuesday. They have
about the same chances.
Georgia, tied once against five
victories, plays host to Houston's
Cougars in a game that rates as
a tossup. In their last outing
Georgia showed some points but
not enough of them to be impres-
sive as theybeat weak Kentucky
h<by only a 35-14 count.
The Yellow Jackets have the
rtS o ersonnel to beat just about any-
one with Kent Lawrence at tail-
r for questions back and ends Billy Payne and,
KAPPA TAU) Dennis Hughes. The defense has
All-Americas Bill Stanfill and
Happy Dicks.
arOUnd the country The Cougars, however, have
oo three wins marred only by a 21-17
rofs.
,C network
neo RAPID COPY CENTER
311 E. LIBERTY

TED KWALICK
defeat at the hands of Oklahoma
State and a 20-20 tie with Texas.
But when they have played the
has-beens, possiblys and never-
were-at-alls they haven't messed
around. They massacred Tulane
54-7 and obliterated Cincinnati
71-33.
Last week they mopped up Mis-
sissippi, a team that has given
more lumps than they have taken,
29-7 with running back Paul Gip-
son rushing for two touchdowns.
To top everything off they lead
the nation in total offense with a
528-plus yard-per-game average
and are second in the scoring race
with a 38.2 point average. Tune in
your short-wave sets to this one
-it'll be good.
In other games, Southern
Methodist travels to Texas in what
may be the championship of the
Southwest and Louisiana State
hosts Ol' Miss in a similar tilt
for the Southeastern Conference
crown.

SAGINAW, Mich (JP - Norm-
ally talkative Denny McLain was
unusually humble yesterday as he
said in a hoarse voice that his
winning of the 1968 American
League Cy Young Award was the
"greatest honor ever put on me."
"When people start mentioning
Bob Gibsons and Sandy Koufaxes
and Don Newcombs, it's great to
be put in a class with them," he
said.
Detroit's 31-game winner in the
'68 season paused, backed up and
corrected h i m s e l f . . . "to be
thought of being put in a class
with them.'
McLain readily admitted that
his World Series foe, St. Louis
hurler Bob Gibson, was "the great-
est pitcher I've ever seen."
"Does that include you?" he
was asked.
"Yes, it does," said McLain, who
is appearing with his musical trio
at a nightclub in Saginaw. Mc-
Lain, who performs on the organ,
just finished a nightclub appear-
ance in Las Vegas.
The 24-year-old McLain became
the only American League pitcher
to become the unanimous choice
in balloting by the Baseball Writ-
ers Association of America for'the
annual award. Earlier in the week,
Gibson won the award for the Na-
tional League.
"It was a great deal of personal
satisfaction, especially getting 20
out of 20 votes," said McLain, who
is suffering -from laryngitis and a
cold he caught from a draft the
last few days.
McLain said the World Series
duel between him and Gibson was
blown out of proportion.
"I wish it would have come out*
a lot better, but it didn't and it's
unfortunate. You never know.
what's going to happen in seven
games," said McLain.+
McLain lost two World Series
games to Gibson !but then came
back to win the sixth game for

-Daily-Andy Sacks
A 30-game winner, with more to come

'4

AmericansI

Detroit but not against Gibson. In
the seventh game, McLain's teams-
mate, Mickey Lolich, defeated Gib-
son to give Detroit the World er-
ies.
McLain said his victory in the
sixth game against Ray Wash-
burn was "probably the most im-
portant one I've ever pitched in
my life."
"You've got to believe you're,
the greatest on the day you pitch.
And that's the way I think. I feel
I'm the best in the league on the
day I pitch and on other days I'm
nobody, because I'm not out
there," he said.
"But as far as I'm concerned,

the greatest pitcher I've ever seen
is still Bobby Gibson. He throws
so doggone hard. He's got great
control and I think he paces him-
self just as hard as he has to un-
til he gets himself in trouble.
"That's the ,sign of a g r e a t
pitcher , . . to reach back a litte
bit and be able to throw the ball
by a few guys when you get in
trouble," said McLain.
McLain said he has been ne-
gotiating with Tiger General
Manager Jim Campbell and that
he's close to a new contract but
would not say whether he will get
the $100,000 he is seeking.

KENSINGTON MARKET WS 1754
WARNER BROS. -SEVEN ARTS RECORDSINC.

M
Monday, I
Uni

Revived Spartans challenge OSUI

By JOE MARKER

In addition to his problem with1

LISTEN TO

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Duffy Daugherty's resurgent complacency, Coach Hayes also
Michigan State Spartans journey has to worry about an injury list
to Columbus. Ohio, to tangle with which has reached a season's
Ohio State in the highlight of to- high.
day's Big Ten action. The game Offensive halfback John Brock-
takes on special importance for ington and defensive men Dick
Michigan, tied for the conference-
lead with the Buckeyes. I" s e
A win for Ohio State today ichigan wv'at
would practically assure them of,
going into the finale against Mich-"3
igi uundefeated, as they take n pfits in Inf 1a
pitiful Wisconsin and Iowxa th111j
next two weeks.
Two weeks ago no one would By ROD ROBERT
have given the Spartans a chance Special To The Daily
against Woody Hayes' machine, BLOOMINGTON - Michigan
but their stunning upset of Notre split its first two matches at the
Dame last week raised a few eye- Indiana Invitational Water Polo
brows. Tournament yesterday. After a
In that contest State showed for thrilling 22-18 overtime victory
the first time an ability to come against Kentucky, Indiana's pow-
up with the key plays, as the de- erful team blasted tie Wolverines
fense twice halted Irish drives 24-7.
within the ten yard line. Bob Zann's tieing goal in the
Ohio State, on the other hand, last second of regulation play en-
has declined steadily since demo- abled Michigan to topple Ken-
lishing Purdue, although still hold- tucky in overtime. Up until the
ing down second place in the na- last three minutes Michigan had
tional polls. Against winless Il- been in control of the game lar-
linois last week, the Buckeyes fell gely because of player-coach
into complacency, squandering 24- Charley Burbach. He scored seven
0 halftime lead. Only a late touch- goals and his fine play stabilized
down broke up a tie game and pre- Michigan's inexperienced team.
served the perfect record. However, Mike Allen and Gary'
THE DIVINE RELATIVITY-
ASocial Conception of God
An introduction to process philosophy as a frame-
work for theological reflection. Informal seminar
sessions, led by Lloyd W. Putnam, are open to all
interested persons.

-r

Worden, Mike Polaski, and Mark
Debevc did not see action against
Illinois, but will see limited service
today. However, defensive halfback
Tim Anderson is not so fortunate
and will be sidelined for the year.
Minnesota entertains Iowa in
er polo squad
na Invitationa

one of the Big Ten's longest and
most intense rivalries. Both teams
are fresh off of the worst pastings
they have received this year.
Iowa was crushed, 44-14, by a
Purdue offense which did not com-
plete a single pass. Minnesota like-
wise was belted to the tune of
33-20 at Michigan in a game that
was much more lopsided than the
score indicated.
The game could turn into a wild
scoring duel, since the H~awkeyes
lead the conference in total of-
fense with a 457-yard ner-game

4.

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662-3748

STRIKE FOR YOUR LIFE !

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STRIKEMEETING
Open SDS meeting for all strikers
Discussion of finalplans for Noy. 4 & 5 strike

I1

I

Kinkead, who had scored five and ...............J J* -***
three goals respectively, fouled \average, while Minnesota should be
out early in the last qurter. Ken- able to post a few points on the
oufal nteatqatr ensoebor against an Iowa de-
tucky then shocked Michigan with scoreboard sendst i de-
fourstrigh goas fnserated second worst in the
four straight goals. Big Ten.
Mi O'Connorseconds cma ace Once-beaten Purdue is a heavy
off. He passed to Zann whose per- favorite to knock off winless Il-
fect shot just caught the lower linois. The Boilermakers have
left corner of the goal. found their stride again after their
In the extra period two of Ken- collapse at Columbus. Against
tucky's starting players fouled out Iowa the Purdue offense rolled up
and ichgan oased hme. 483 yards on 92 rushes and no
and Michigan coasted home passes
But the Wolverines' second
game was no heartstopper, as In- With injured quarterback Mike
diana stopped tfie Wolverines cold. Phipps returned to the line-up to-
Goalie, Tom Look could not con- day against a porous Illinois de-
tend with AAU water polo All- fense, the Boilermakers should
Americans Dan and Don Casey i easily surpass the 500-yard mark.
who scored over half of the Fabulous Leroy Keyes needs on-
Hoosier goals. ly 53 yards to eclipse the all-time
The impressive Indiana team Purdue rushing record of 1802
controlled the game from start to yards held by Duane Pervis (1932-
finish by capitalizing on Michi- 34).
gan's defensive lapses and pre- Last, and by all stretches of
venting them from using their imagination, least, Indiana travels
ster the first quarter it was to Madison to spoil Wisconsin's
8-2 and the game was all but over. homecoming. The Badgers are cur-
The only Michigan player who rently running neck and neck with
could penetrate Indiana's defense the 1961 Illinois eleven in the race
sucessfully was sophomore Mike toward super-ineptness.
Allen. His four goals were about Thatamemorable team went 0-9
the only bright: spot in the con- and was outscored 53-289, while
test. Wisconsin' is chugging along at
Indiana and Loyola of Chicago 0-6,fwhile being outpointed 34-189.
emerged as co-favorites to capture Indiana is fresh from a 16-13
the team title. Indiana also beat hearthumper over Arizona, the
Kentucky, 11-6, while Loyola leading defensive squad in the
humiliated Western Illinois, 18-6. country, and should provide a
Tomorrow morning Michigan will stern test for the Wisconsin de-
face the tough Ramblers from fensive wall which has yielded over
Chicago. 30 points per contest.

I I

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