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November 01, 1968 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-01

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11"

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, November 1, 1968

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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GUILD HOUSE.
802 Monroe
NOV. 1st
NOON LUNCHEON 25c
BILL AYERS, Community School;
"Radical Issues in Education"

University to explore Great Lakes basin
as part of Sea Grant Colleges program

Johnson calls halt
to bombing of North

TONIGHT and SATURDAY
Pamela M iles

1421 Hill St.
8:30P.M.

By FRANK BROWNING
Plans are nearing completion for
a half-million dollar program
which would thrust the University
into the midst of Great Lakes re-
gional development.
Prof. William Farris, associate
dean of the Engineering School, is
chairman of a six-man interde-
partmental planning committee
charged with drawing up a propos-
al for the University's participa-
tion in the Sea Grant Colleges
program.
Modeled on the same principles
as the century-old Landgrant Col-
leges act, Sea Grant is designed
to provide large-scale continuous
support to universities for the de-
RAPID COPY CENTER
311 E. LIBERTY
COPIES WHILE YOU WAIT
AS LOW AS 6/1 Oc Per Copy
DROP iN OR CALL
662-3748

velopment and exploitation of Secondly, and at a later stage,
marine resources. marine researchers would join
The University would become with social scientists and econo-
the seventh institution to receive mists to suggest what kind of new
Sea Grant funds since the pro- or altered institutions are neces-;
gram was created by Congressional sary for implementation of policy.
action in 1966. For example, water currents in
Two themes emerge in Uni- Lake Michigan move almost di-
versity planning to date, Farris rectly south on the west side of
says. the lake. As a result the thous-
First, applied research in t h e ands of tons of sewage and in-
physical and biological sciences dustrial waste deposited at Mil-
and in engineering would attempt waukee feed directly into Chi-
to gather the broad base of data cago's fresh water supply.
about the Great Lakes necessary One possible problem for scien-
for developmental planning. From tists and engineers to tackle un-
that information future alterna- der the Sea Grant program would
tive management policies can be be what kind of trade-off can be
outlined. devised between the two cities to
NOW I1SHOWING!
The Year's Most Significant Reserved Seat Attraction
JOSEPH ELEVINE p,,:AN AVCO EMBASSY FILM

Returning by overwhelming pop-
ular demand to sing blues, bal-
lads, contemporary and original
folk music. Accompanied by
guitar, recorder, and harp with
Dave Johns playing guitar and
harmonica.
$1.00 cover includes free food.

provide both efficient waste re-
moval for Milwaukee and adequate,
fresh water for Chicago. As an
alternative, Chicago might simply
reach further out into the lake for
fresh water or it might assume
some of the costs of building a
waste purification facility at Mil-
waukee.
If funded, the Sea Grant pro-
gram would initially have its high-
est impact on the School of Na-
tural Resources and the College of
Engineering's Department of Me-
teorology and Oceanography, Far-
ris explains.
One of the unsettled issues in
the program is where the Great'
Lakes Reserch Institute will be
located. Currently a part of the
Institute for Science and Tech-
nology, there has been pressure for
the last year to transfer it into an
academic division and increase its
teaching component.
As Prof. Jim McFadden describ-
es it, the unique aspect of the pro-
posed Sea Grant program is the
underlying premise on which it
has been built. When the Univer-
sity received a $25,000 planning
grant from the National Science
Foundation (which received a 25
per cent cut along with other NSF
grants) in July, the explicit charge
was to promote a "development
program in the Great Lakes
basin."
McFadden is an associate pro-
fessor in the Department of Fish-
eries of the Natural Resources
School.
"Development is the key term
in the whole Sea Grant act," Mc-
Fadden says. "It is directed at
activities which enable mankind
to capitalize on marine resources.

V
*

(Continued from Page 1)
publican Richard M. Nixon and
American Independent George C.
Wallace of the decision he had
reached.
This was about 6 p.m. Twenty
minutes later he got congressional
leaders of both parties on the tele-
phone to tell them.
And he plans to see whoever
turns up winner of next Tuesday's
election, and brief him fully on all
the diplomatic steps that led to
the decision.
Most observers seemed to think
the bombardment halt - and any
heightened hopes for peace ac-
companying it y- would be bound
to help Humphrey in his uphill
fight to overtake Nixon, credited
as front runner in most polls.
The question was whether any
such boost would be enough to
put Humphrey across.
The President said that he i9
halting all air, naval and artillery
bombardment of North Vietnam,
under his current decision, but of-
ficials said this applies to all acts
involving use of force, including
troop activity in the North. It does
exempt, however, unarmed recon-
naissance.
The President made it clear that
he considers some risks still are
involved, and said the N o r t h
Vietnamese have been put on no-
tice that any violation of the
U.S. conditions will bring immed-
iate retaliation.
And U.S. officials were saying
that what has been achieved is by
no means peace at this point -
merely another hopeful step
toward it.
Hanoi was told pointedly in ad-
vance that any cessation of bomb-

PETER
O'TOOLE
as H-enr~y II, Kng of England

,
__ 1

KATHARINE
HEPBURN
a, AMAen o r of q P O L L n o -
, MARTIN POLL aw

I

I

FRIDAY-12:00 noon - Michigan Union
C ISSUES LUNCHEON.
(through cdoors along south side of basement cafeteria)
THIS WEEK
a Film: FRUSTRATED CAMPUS
-confrontation between students and structures affecting their lives-black
and white activists-students and faculty.
NEXTWEEK'S CAMPUS POLICE
TOPIC: *4 -- E """
instead of police on campus-a relevant choice?
Bag it, Buy your Lunch, or Don't Eat.
DISCUSSION: FREE
Office of Student Organizations, 1011 S.A.B.

fpii
LION IN
WINTER
8std upon 1h¢ MSay by Eetualve Nducer "ale~lay by
JAMES GOLDMAN JOSEPH E.LEVINE JAMES GOLDMAN
Produced by witted yy Mu.. c..sian
MARTIN POLL ANTHONY HARVEY 0 BJOH13ARRY
MAE'0E MBASSYPICTURES S.NOW VANTA0X-I iCOEOR IY
RESERVED SEAT TICKETS NOW AT BOX-OFFICE OR BY MAIL

ing in the North-if followed by
"abuse" of the Demilitarized Zone,
attacks on cities or provincial cap-
itals, or refusal by North Vietnam
to enter promptly into serious poli-
tical discussions - could not be
sustained. And a condition also
was laid down that the discus-
sions would have to include the
elected government of South Viet-
nam.
Johnson emphasized "that their
attendance in no way involves re-
cognition of the National Libera.
tion Front in any form. Yet, it
conforms to the statements that
we have made many times over
the years that the NLF would
have no difficulty making i t s
views known."
Secretary of Defense Clark M.
Clifford assured newsmen that
the nation's military leaders
supported -the bombing halt as
"a perfectly acceptable military
risk."
Clifford said the Communists'
lack of military success plus pros-
pects for progress in Paris led
U.S. officials "to believe that
North Vietnam will not attempt
to take advantage of this bomb-
ing' halt" in a military way.
Defense and military officials,
in conversations with newsmen,
said the U.S. commander in iVet-
nam, has full authority to take
whatever action he deems neces-
sary -to protect U.S. troops.
Military officials said Abrams
has been empowered to' destroy
enemy forces and facilities en-
gaged in attacking his forces
across the Demilitarized Zone.
They did not dispute the in-
terpretation that this meant Ab-
rams could order retaliatory air
strikes to resume just above the
DMZ if American forces in that
area were Jeopardized.
Newsmen asked why a bombing
halt could kie acceptable now
when in the past military men
had claimed that American cas-
ualties would escalate if a halt
were ordered.
Defense officials noted that the
enemy failed in a third attempt
this year to mount a major of-
fensive beginning in August and
continuing through recent days,
and has now withdrawn some
40.000 troops from- South Viet-
nam. The North Vietnamese are
also initiating fewer ,attacks in
South Vietnam than at any time
since 1965, officials said.
These factors; combined with
the belief North Vietnam is now
ready for serious negotiations, led
military officials to believe the
bombing halt was acceptable.
It was pointed out that even in
the last few hours rockets have
been launched against Slagon, and
defense officials indicated that
such isolated incidents cOuld be
tolerated.
The officials also said the
bombing halt applies only to
North Vietnam. This means that
U.S. planes can continue attack-
ing enemy supply lines and sane-
tuaries and the heavily traveled
Laos pipeline from North to South
Vietnam.
These officials also made it
plain that there is no agreement
with Hanoi about its continued
resupply of the some 80,000 North
Vietnamese stationed in South
Vietnam.

- --- - - 1

Box Office
Schedule of Performances and
Prices:
EVENINGS Main ti.& ler.ate.
Me. tore Sat..8:15 33.00 32.0
SnedaY. 7:30 e.m. 3.00 2.50

Open Daily Nodnto9
MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLEDI"
MUS C HALL THEATRE Madison at Brush
Please send n tickets fee
i Mat. LEve. Ist aiernota date .w
'aend
STREET
CITY_______STATE.......,.

MATINEES
Wednesday, 2:00 g.m. 2.00
Saturday, 2:00 ... 2.50
Sunday. 2:00 O.3. 3.00

1.75
2.00
2.50

Tickets also ayailable at J. L.. Hudson, all Sears stores, and AAA branches.
MUSIC HALL MDSO TBRUSH
Plan your Theatre Party now-Telephone: Lee Walk 961-5482

Y

AI

r+rr.r r r i i r N IM

Ll

YERS

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN BANDS
Present
BANDORAMA-
Featuring
THE MARCHING BAND
THE SYMPHONY BAND
THE CONCERT BAND
THE VARSITY BAND .
THE JAZZ BAND,
THE FRIARS
THE DIXIELAND DREAMERS
THE CHORDBUSIERS
THE SOFT SHOE SEVEN
And JOHN HENEY, xylophone soloist
formerly of the Sousa Band
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16
8:00 P.M. Hill Auditorium
All seats reserved. Tickets $2.00 - $1.50
General Sales begin Monday, November 11,
9:00-4:00 at Hill Auditorium Box Office
and continue daily through showtime.

11

0

FOR
THO

SSE

I

'1

a

L

The following local attorneys
support PIETER THOMASSEN
for DISTRICT JUDGE

A beauty parlor
you can take
back to school.

h
4I

Louis Andrews Jr. Charles H. Dever

Richard B,. Bailey
James R. Beek
Shirley J. Burgoyne
Roscoe 0. Bonisteel,
Roscoe 0. Bonisteel, Jr.
Robert M. Brimacombe
Louis E. Burke
Henry T. Conlin
William J. Conlin
Clan Crawford, Jr.
James A. Crippen

John B. DeVine
John S. Dobson
Jack S. Dulgeroff
Clarence E. Eldridge, Jr.
Graydon H. Ellis, Jr.
A. Philip Fichera
Karl R. Frankena
Thomas H. Green
Mark W. Griffin
Vanzetti Hamilton
Robert W. Harrington

B. Todd Jones
Allyn D. Kantor
Donald H. Kenney
John D. Ketelhut
John R. Laird
William M. Laird
Richard W. Lovely
Dwaine V. Lighthammer
Chris L. McKenney
Edwin L. Pear
Nicholas S. Piklor
Paul L. Proud, Jr.
Douglas K. Reading

Robert J. Rennell
William F. Richardson
Claude S. Rogers
Richard W. Ryan
James E. Stephenson
J. Phillip Surratt
Stanley J. Thayer
James P. Tryand
Robert D. Ulrich
Edward L. Vandenberg
John K. VanLoon
Richard P. Whitker
Richard M. Wood

i

In many ways the Norelco Beauty
Sachet is just like a beauty parlor.
It manicures, pedicures, mas-,
sages, applies facial creams, buffs
and files nails, and stimulates your
scalp and muscles.
But in another way, it's more
than a beauty parlor.
It also shaves your legs and
underarms. And it shaves underarms
as close or closer than a blade in 2
out of 3 shaves as tested in an inde-
pendent laboratory. (As does the

Lady Norelco 15t.on the right.)
The Lady Norelco is a shaver
that has two shaving edges. One for
legs, and one for underarms.
It also has a 110/220 voltage
selector for easy travel use.
And it's not at all expensive
Even if it shaves like it is.
the close. t~et.comfortable Ladies'shaver

Richard J. DWeLamielleure E. Edward Hood

elect

4

DIETED

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