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November 01, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-11-01

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Friday, November , 1968

THE MIC,,,HIGAN DAILY

Rage Three

FrdaNoebe , 98 TEMQIANDLYPgThe

The '64
WASHINGTON' (P) T h e
three leading candidates for
President have been crisscross-
ing America for months, each
telling voters he can handle the
country's problems better than
either of his opponents.
Civil rights, crime and labor
have been among the key do-,
mestic issues as the candidates
with mfllions of words, have de-
fended their own records and at-
tacked those of their foes.
But what are the records that
lie behind that oratory? What,
' for example, was Independent
party candidate George C. Wal-
lace's record on labor legislation
when he was governor of Ala-
bama? And what -is Democratic
nominee Hubert H. Humphrey's
record on crime? Or Republican
Richard M. Nixon's record on
civil rights?
CIVIL RIGHTS'
AS MAYOR OF MINNEA-
POLIS in 1946; Humphrey es-
tablished a Mayor's Council on
Human Relations to deal with
alleged racial discrimination. He
also won passage of the nation's
first municipal fair employment
practices act.
At the 1948 Democratic Na-
tional Convention, Humphrey
led a successful fight for a

I candidates:

Their domestic records

stronger civil rights platform
plank.
As a member of the Senate
from 1949 through 1964 Hum-,
phrey voted for the Civil Rights
Acts of 1956, 1960 and 1964. He
was floor leader for the 1964
bill and received much of the
credit for its passage.
NIXON SERVED IN THE
HOUSE from 1947 through 1950
and the Senate from 1951
through 1952. In 1949, he voted
for a bill barring states f r o m
making payment of a poll tax a
requirement for voting in na-
tional elections.
In 1950, Nixon voted for a bill
establishing a Fair Employment
Practices Commission with pow.
er to investigate,' recommend
and seek voluntary compliance.
The bill had been substituted for
a compulsory FEPC bill filed
by President Truman.
As vice president from 1953
through 1960, Nixon was chair-
man of the President's Commit-
tee on Government Contracts.
On May 9, 1957, Nixon asked the
heads of federal contracting
agencies to deny federal con-
tracts to firms practicing racial
discrimination.
When Congress convened in
1957, Nixon, as president of the

Senate, gave an informal opin-
ion that Senate rules could be
changed by a majority vote. His
position supported that of sena-
tors seeking to make it easier to
stop filibusters aimed at block-
ing civil rights legislation.
In 1968, Nixon telephoned key
Republicans in the House urging
them to support the pending
civil rights bill with its open
housing provision.
' WALLACE FIRST RAN FOR
GOVERNOR of Alabama in 19-
58 but was defeated by John
Patterson who received the sup-
port of the Ku Klux Klan. Wal-
lace denounced the klan and was
endorsed by the National Asso-
ciation for the Advancement of
Colored People.
After the gubernatorial elec-
tion, Wallace returned to his
post as a state circuit court
judge. When the U.S. Civil
Rights Commission asked to see
voting records of counties with-
in his juducial district, Wallace
took possession of the records
and threatened to jail any com-
mission staff member who tried
to get them.
A federal judge ordered Wal-
lace to give up the records. He
refused and was cited for con-
tempt. Wallace later turned the
records over to grand juries and
was acquitted of the contempt
charge.
Elected governor in 1962, Wal-
lace closed h i s inaugural ad-
dress with the cry: "Segrega-
tion now. Segregation tomorrow.
Segregation forever."
In 1963 he stood in the admin-
istration building doorway at
the University of Alabama to
block entrance of two black stu-
dents. President Kennedy feder-
alized the Alabama National
Guard and Wallace stepped
aside on orders of the guard
commander.
Wallace called the Alabama
legislature into special session
on Sept. 21, 1964, to adopt a res-

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Humphrey
olution calling for a constitu-
tional amendment that would
bar federal courts from order-
ing integration of schools. The
resolution passed both branches
unanimously.
On Nov. 23, 1965, Wal-
lace asked a federal court in
-Montgomery to bar enforcement
of the 1965 federal, Voting
Rights Act on the grounds it was
unconstitutional. His motion
was denied.
On Sept. 2, 1966, he signed a
bill which he had proposed to
nullify all existing compliance
agreements by Alabama school
boards with federal integration
guidelines..
CRIME
DURING FOUR YEARS as
governor. Wallace proposed and
won passage of legislation ex-
panding the state police forcer25
percent and creating four re-
gional riot control units.
In 1963, the legislature passed
a Wallace proposal to appropri-
ate $5.5 million. to modernize
the state prison system.
Alabama state police were
used to break up a voting rights
demonstration at Selma in 1965.
When civil rights leaders an-
nounced plans to march from
Selma to Montgomery, Wallace,
with suport from the legisla-
ture, declared the state lacked
manpower to protect civil rights
demonstrators and asked for
federal assistance.
Federal Bureau of Investiga-
tion crime rate statistics for 19-
65, while Wallace was governor,
show Alabama with 1,068 total
offenses per 100,000 inhabitants
ouests,
Do them a favor. Put
them up at Bell Tower
Hotel, then join them
on the town after the
game. I
Bell Tower Hotel-
bigger than before,
elegant new rooms and
suites-the only great
hotel in campustown.
Near where all the
action is.
Reservations? 769-3010
BELL TOWER HOTEL
300 S. Thayer
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
ii00@@

compared with a national aver-
age of 1,502.
AFTER TAKING OFFICE as
mayor of Minneapolis, Humph-
rey appointed a new police chief
andordered him to crack down
on crime, particularly gambling
and prostitution. He reorganized
the police department and ap-
pointed a Citizen's Law Enforce-
ment Committee.
As a senator, Humphrey in
troduced legislation to provide
federal grants to state programs
to combat juvenile delinquency.
In 1958, -Humphrey' voted
against a proposal to bar ques-
tioning of a suspect unless he
was first informed of the nature
of the accusation and of his
rights. In the same session, he
opposed a bill to bar federal
courts from disqualifying con-
fessions solely because of a de-
lay in 'bringing the suspect to
arraignment.'
DURING NIXON'S CAREER
in the House and Senate, there
was no major legislation deal-
ing with crime.
Nixon was active while in
Congress in internal security
matters. He headed the investi-
gation that led to the convic-
tion of Alger Hiss on a perjury
charge in 1949.
LABOR
NIXON SERVED on the Labor
Committees of both the House
and Senate.
As a member of the oHuse
committee in 1947, he helped
draft the Taft-Hartley Law. He
voted for the bill's passage over
a veto by President Harry S.
Truman.
In 1949, Nixon voted to in-
crease grants to states for ad-
ministration of unemployment
compensation and other em-
ploymept programs. The same
year he voted to increase the
minimum wage to 75 cents an
hour.
As vice president, he broke a
Senate tie in 1956 to support a
bill giving state highway depart-
ments rather than the secretary
of labor the authority to deter-
mine wage rates to be paid

workers in the interstate high-
way system.
In 1959, he broke a tie to sup-
port a motion retaining in the
Landrum-Griffin Labor Act, an
amendment designed to pro-
tect union members against un-
fair actions by their unions.
In 1962, while campaigning
for governor of California, Nixon
opposed a, state right-to-work
law.
WHILE WALLACE WAS gov-
ernor he supported legislation
increasing unemployment com-
pensation toa$38 a week in 1965,
$42 in 1967 and $44 in 1968. He
also' supported increasing work-
men's compensation from $33 a
week to $38 in 1963.
A right-to-work law was pass-
ed by the Alabama legislature
in 1953 after Wallace left that
body to become a circuit judge.
As governor he opposed repeal of
the law.
While a member of the legis-
lature in 1952, he won passage
of the Wallace Industrial Act
designed to bring new industry
to Alabama. Wallace says this
has created 100,000 new jobs.
HUMPHREY HAD STRONG
labor support when he defeated
incumbent Republican Sen. Jo-
seph H. Ball in 1948. One cam-
paign issue was Ball's vote. in
favor of the Taft-Hartley law.
In the Senate in 1949, Hum-
phrey opposed a bill giving the
President power to seek injunc-
tions and seize plants in strikes
deemed national emergencies.
In 1959 Humphrey voted for
the Landrum-Griffin bill after,
an unsuccessful attempt to de-
feat a section designed to pro-
tect union members from unfair
treatment by their unions.
He supported a resolution in
1963 to turn the railroad em-
ploye work rules dispute over to
an arbitration board and de-
clare a moratorium, on strikes
on this issue.
While in the Senate. Hum-
phrey voted for increases in fed-
eral minimum wages. He also
advocated extension of the Na-
tional Labor Relations Act to
farm workers.

Nixon Wallace

the
news today
b) The Associaed Press and College Press Service
PIECES OF THE SCORPION, t h e nuclear-powered
submarine which vanished last May, were found yester-
day under two miles of water on the Atlantic floor.
The Navy identified portions of the hull - irretrievable,
because of the depth - about 400 miles southwest of the
Azores, using underwater cameras, magnetic sensors and son-
ar gear.
The submarine disappeared last May with 99 officers and
men aboard. Since then, more than 6,000 men, 40 ships and
numerous patrol planes have searched for the carcass of the
ship in what Chief of Naval Operations Thomas Moorer call-
ed "the most extensive sea search ever conducted."
Although the Navy would like to recover some of the de-
bris, it has virtually no resources for salvaging in such deep
water.
ISRAELI COMMANDOS slipped into Egypt yesterday
and blew up two bridges and a power station on the Nile
River, according to Israeli army sources.
The government said the action - the first Israeli pene-
tration of Egypt since the Six Days' War - was reprisal for
"aggressive Egyptian acts" across the Suez in past weeks.
GEORGE PAPANDREOU, t h r e e times premier of
Greece, died yesterday 24 hours after major surgery.
The former premier was ousted from office last year by a
military junta.'
. * 0
POPE PAUL'S council of cardinals held one of its rare
meetings yesterday, touching off reports of a crisis de-
veloping in the Vatican.
Content of the emergency meeting was not disclosed, but
sources speculated that the cardinals discussed how to fight
the growing wave of defiance among lay people and priests
against the Pope's encyclical banning artificial contraception.
Pope Paul recently deplored such disobedience as a sin,
and is reportedly preparing a major document emphasizing
papal ;authority.
" "
VIETCONG GUNNERS launched yesterday their first
rocket attack on Saigon in more than a month.
The attack, which killed three persons and wounded four
on the eve of South Vietnam's National Independence Day,
came amid widespreac speculation that Hanoi and Washing-
ton are near agreement on a bombing halt of the North.
TWO UNMANNED SPACESHIPS were launched yes-
terday by the Soviet Union, just one day after comple-
tion of their manned flight.
Although nothing in the brief announcements on the
launchings hinted at a space spectacular, the flights opened
the possibility that the two new Cosmos may be a direct fol-
lowup to the Soyuz 3.
NARCOTICS RAIDS led to the arrest of 41 suspect-
ed sellers in New Brunswick, N. J. yesterday.
A small army of 150 law enforcement officers s w e p t
through homes and apartments before dawn in a synchroniz-
ed, carefully planned raid - the biggest in New Jersey his-
tory.
Police said most of the persons arrested lived in a pre-
dominantly low-income section of the city. Warrants were is-
sued on the basis of purchases - mostly heroin, but also mari-
juana - made by a state police agent posing as a narcotics
user.
WAGE HIKES in major 1 a b o r contracts this year
boosted the salaries of 3.4 million workers 7.5 per cent.
A Labor Department report showed the pay increases
were the highest since the government started keeping tabs
on them 15 years ago - and two percentage points over last
year's gain.
DEMOCRATS PLAN TO SPEND $2.5 million on tele-
vision and radio advertising in the last days of the presi-
dential campaign.
Buoyed by an increase in financial contributions, the
Democratic National Committee says it can match Nixon on
television time.
The Democrats have suffered throughout the campaign
due to lack of funds.

V OR l~f15a

IN AVE.
-9701t

PARAMOUNT PICTURES preses t
a MAG BODARD Production Staong
MICHELE MORGAN
MICHEL PICCOLI
PIERRE CLEMENTI
acCATHERINE DENEUVE

Ne jamOLRYFANIANWUCETryOU#AU
MON. thru FRI. - 7:00, 9:00 ANCINESERGE AWNA(E
A,7:0 ,CATERINE ROUVELR -LER
SAT. and SUN.'- 3:00, 5:7:00, 9:00 CrnRIE~tVI d IE"with

n

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN SOCIETY

th
HS

I3rlutugI
Fo VJa

JACQUES DUFILHO
Screeno.ay by NNA COMPANEEZ - Directed by MICHEL DEVILLE
Photography by GHISLAIN CLOQUET- COLOR
A PARC FILM MARIANNE PRODUCTIONS CO.PRODUCTION
A PARAMOUNT PICTURE

I

The
GONDOLIERS
or
the King
of Barataria
WED.-FRI.,
Nov. 13-15
8 p.m.

presents

_ __
a-

U NDER G R O UN D

at the Vth Forum
5th Ave. at Liberty, 761 -9700

I

N
D
E
R
G
R
0

I

Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun.-11:00 P.M.
-separate admission required

Sat., Nov. 16,
7 p.m. & 10 p.m.
LYDIA-
MENDELSSOHN
THEATRE

MAD MARVIN PRESENTS IN ANN ARBOR:
CORRUPTION OF THE DAMNED-George Kuchar-One of the great film-makers presents a
FEATURE LENGTH unforgettable Underground Comedy. "A wild orgy-filled odyssey. Seethes
with violence and sex." -Village Voice
Plus these great short films:
VIVIAN-Bruce Conner-A study of a beautiful woman.
SAN FRANCISCO TRIPS FESTIVAL-Ben Van Meter-A psychedelic documentary of the San
Francisco Trips Festival and the Opening of the Psychedelic Shop.
WORD MOVIE-Paul Sharits-Highly experimental. Fifty wards visually repeated in varying se-
quential and positional relationships.

Please send check and order form below to U-M Gilbert
and Sullivan Society, Student Activities Bldg.
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104..
r - ------- -w ""
THE GONDOLIERS
I enclose $ for- - tickets to THE GONDOLIERS on
the date indicated below:
Wed. All seats reserved!
Thurs.___ All seats $2.50 each
Fri. _Please make checks
Sat._(7 p.m.) payable to
Sat. _(10 p.m.) The University of Michigan

NAME

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