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October 31, 1968 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-31

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Thursday, October , 31,:1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Thursday, October 31, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

apoplexy
doug belier

l

Grid esthetics: Mandich loves

rM' Stadium

I' ---
Gettibng a team up
for the little game
Everybody knows that Michigan's next three opponents,
Northwestern, Illinois and Wisconsin, aren't any good.
The members of the Big Ten's "little three" have a combined 1-17
record; and the one victory was Northwestern's incestuous 13-10 tri-
pumph over Wisconsin last Saturday.
A schedule like this leaves a football coach in a quandary. While
anticipating three happy victories, he still has to guard against a let-
down by his own forces, a letdown that could turn one of these con-
tests into a nightmare that would haunt him for the rest of his life.
The usual approach a coach tries in this situation is to build up
the opposition and give the impression that they're really under-rated.
He remembers the phrase, "on a given afternoon, any team in the
conference can beat any other team."
For the benefit of his following the coach has to repeat that
old traditional cliche a b o u t the hightly respected opponent:
"they're tough."
This phrase is repeated so often it is beginning to wear out. If
Ara Parseghian and Notre Dame were to face Oshkosh State on Sat-
urday, you could bet your life savings that at least once he would
come up with "they're tough."
And the funny thing is, he would also say "they're tough" if his
team was playing Ohio State instead of Oshkosh State.
However, a major problem arises. Many teams ignore their coach-
es efforts at getting them ready and the result is often a disaster. For
instance, earlier this season the nationally rated Florida Gators faced,
horrible North Carolina and were slaughtered, 22-7.
Were the Tarheels taken for granted? That's an understate-
ment,
All right. An upset of this magnitude is rare. A much more com-
mon occurrence is when the fired-up underdog takes the field and
scares the pants =off the heavy favorite. An example of this was the
Purdue-Wake Forest .clash, which Purdue pulled out in the final
moments 28-27.
And then, for two straight weeks in a row Ohio State has had
trouble with "little three" members, coming through in the fourth
quarter against both Northwestern and Illinois.
Clearly, the old methods of getting a team up just don't work
any more. The sophisticated players see right through the talk,
and their minds often prove their downfall.
Perhaps an alternate method is in order. Wouldn't it be fun for
11 a change if. a coach came out with something like the following:
"We aren't going to kid anybody. This hapless bunch of boobs
we're playing Just plain stinks. We are going to use this game
as a test of our team's virility.
"If we don't screw 'em by at least four touchdowns, then we
aren't playing up to standard. It simply means that the whole squad
will have to take 25 laps of the field immediately following the game.
"And if we somehow lose, the whole mess of players are going to
jump off the Brooklyn Bridge."
Some fun, huh. Don't tell Alabama coach Paul "Bear" Bryant
about this.
He might try it.

By CINDY' LEATHERMAN
Jim Mandich loves the stadium
at night. "On summer nights es-
pecially, it's really beautiful." And
on Saturday afternoons in the fall
it's even prettier-especially this
year.
Mandich has done a good deal to
make the stadium a very nice
place to be for thousands of Mich-
igan fans . . . particularly during
THE game against Michigan
State. It was one of his "greatest
thrills" to be on the receiving end
daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL DINNER
of a 53-yard touchdown pass from
Dennis Brown five minutes after
the Spartans .had taken a one-
point lead. This play put the Wol-
verines ahead to stay.
Mandich himself attributes the
success'of this year's squad to a
new-found optimism. "We did
have a lot of returning men who
are very capable. But there's been
a change mentally in that t h e
guys believe when they go out on
that field that they're going to
win.
"When you start losing, like last

ahead as the next Saturday. "II
think we'll beat Ohio State, but
first we have to beat Northwestern,1
Illinois, and Wisconsin."
A junior from Solon, Ohio, Man-
dich stands 6'3", which is a prettyx
wierd thing in itself. It's wierd in
that no one else in his family is
over 5'10", including his father
and older brother. As he explains,
"I was just lucky, I guess."'
Mandich plays tight end and he
plays it very well. Coach Elliott is'
the first to compliment his per-
formance. "Jim is probably one of
the finest players we have. He has
exceptional ability and he works,
very hard to improve this ability.
He's a strong blocker and a very
good receiver which is important
in the position he plays."
Part of this success has to be
attributed to Mandich's confident
attitude. "You have to believe in
yourself," he observes. "Some
people often mistake that for be-
ing arrogant, cocky, or whatever
you want to call it. But I approach
everything confidently, believing I
can do it."
His roommate at the Beta Theta
Pi fraternity feels the same way.
"Some people think he's arrogant,
but that just isn't true. He's a
helluva nice guy- He's just got a
lot of confidence in himself .
he knows he's good, and he is.'
Mandich started playing football
in seventh grade, and by the time
he reached his senior year, he had1
become a very important factor in
the undefeated record sported by
the Solon football squad. Like a

lot of athletes before him, Man-
dich "chose Michigan because of
the combination of athletics and
academics here."
His philosophy of the game?
"Football is, number one, an end
in itself-I play for the satisfac-
tion and enjoyment of the game.
And it's a means to an end in that
it's allowed me to get an excellent
education at one of the best uni-
versities."
Mandich is majoring in econom-
ics and "would like to go on 'to
graduate school here, either in law
or business administration." But
this might have to come later.
"Barring injury and the draft, if I
OAKLAND (P) - John
Clawson, a member of the
United States' Olympic as
ketball team, Wednesday
signed a contract with t h e
Oakland Oaks of the Amer-
ican Basketball Association.
Clawson, a 6-foot-4 guard,
played at the University of
Michigan, graduating in 1966
and spent two years in the
U.S. Army.
Clawson will join the club
for its game Thursday night
with Los Angeles.

JIM MANDICH

year, you can't help but develop
a losing attitude," he continued,
"but this year we have a winning
attitude and it's made the differ-
ence . . . this is what's propelled
us through the season."
Mandich is as optimistic as any-
one, but he's looking only as far

|
j
|

ELIGIBILITY INCREASED:

had the opportunity, I'd definitely
like to play pro."
In what little spare time he has,
Mandich plays paddleball - and
basketball. "I like all sports."
In Mandich's opinion, all t h e
members of the team "get along
very well. There's no tension inter-
racially. You hear about a lot of
tension on college campuses today
with the black athletes feeling
they've been exploited. This is
nonexistant on our team."
But there may be another type
of tension on the team this year
-a certain pressure to keep on
winning feels differently. I don't

JIM MANDICH, MICHIGAN'S versatile offensive end, displays
the, sure-handed qualities that have marked him as a potent re-
ceiver as well as effective blocker. Last season, Mandich caught
twenty-six passes, and looks to better that mark this year.

Gridde Pickings

-I

Murder, robbery, rape and
riots-all normal in the naked city
(or any other city). But last night
humanity sunk to a new low.
Tfie Student Publications
Building was bombed lastnight.
No, not the usual bombing. But
an act much more vile and insid-
ius. Some villian launched h e r
missiles of the rotten egg and
pumpkin variety against this be-
loved bastion of editorial freedom.
4 In the wee hours of the morn-
ing, student radicals apprehended
the criminal while she was watch-
ing TV Chapel after the late-lateh
show. Though her name has not
been released to the press, full
details .of this crook's confession
4have become known.
Her story is a revelation of the y
criminal mind. It -seems she has
been entering DAILY Sports'
Gridde Pickings contest for the BULLY AT LARGE
past eight years. Last week though,
she almost won. Her first 19 picks were correct but she was auto-
matically disqualified for choosing the uac muggers in last week's
forgettable game.
Her plan was simple. She would attack on the night before
Halloween to throw suspicion from herself. "After all", she schemed,
"there must be scores of football 'players more suspect than I."
But this daughter of Iago and sixth cousin to Caesare Borgia
made one mistake. Football players do not eat eggs for breakfast.
They consume babies and cactus greens.
f4 As the. villian was carried away she said, "Now the DAILY
really eats it."
By the way, if you're lucky, and enter Gridde Pickings before
midnight Friday, you too can eat it. For, to each fortunate forcaster
(who gets the most right), goes a nice sticky gooey Cottage Inn Pizza.

Utah State handed probation
ST. LOUIS (P) - Utah State by the council would allow ath- housing for student athletE
University was reprimanded, cen- letes four years of varsity com- non-athletes.
sured and slapped with an inde- petition in all sports, except foot- Both recommendationsv
finite period of probation yester- ball and basketball, but only three binding on schools an
day by the NCAA for violations of years of eligibility in NCAA com- would be no penalty for an
financial aid and eligibility rules petition. choosing to ignore the rec
infractions. Two policy recommendations dation.
Arthur Bergstrom, executive as- were adopted by the council. One Under the interpretatio
sistant to the National Collegiate recommends that universities pro- dent who does not have
Athletic Association, announced hibit the use of their facilities by grade standing and enro
the penalties against the school professional teams except In junior college must hav
for violations involving one stu-p eatamse ' grade for a mimm of
dent-footballplayer.emergenycepted credits in order to
The NCAA committee on infrac- The other recommendation was gible for financial aid and
tions charged the school's head that schools provide the s a m e play.
coach helped the student pay off --- ----- ------_~
a loan in violation of NCAA rulesI
and allowed the student to partici-
pate in spring practice, also in o l tkpviainofN
A rue.Northern Michigan University / /
was also reprimanded and censur- 1b tt hepatitis not sevej
ed for participating in a non-cer-
tified post season football game
while its application for NCAA Purdue football coach Jack Wake Forest game two we
membership was still pending. Mollenkopf, stricken with hepati- and "has been draggingE
Bergstrom said the NCAA had re- tis several days ago, does not have The 'Purdue mentor ha
commended against such partici- a severe case according to latest lished an outstanding reco:
pation and the school's action had reports. The Boilermaker mentor at the school, haying h;
shown bad faith. No penalty went has been placed in isolation, one losing season since 1
along with the censure, Bergstrom though, and is out for a minimum cluded in that record is a
added. of three weeks. With only four over Southern California
The action against the two weeks left in the season, it is not 1967 Rose Bowl.
schools brought to six the number really expected that he will be The Boilermaker's le
of institutions censured or put back at all. bound to be missed. "I'm
on probation by the NCAA. Head coaching duties have fallen head coach in name;" s
Earlier Wednesday Pan Amern- into the hands of Bob DeMoss Moss. "We'll miss the bos
can College of Edinburg, Tex., was in Mollenkopf's absence. DeMoss
put on one year's probation for is a former Purdue quarterback
violations of rules governing re- and considered the mastermind of RAPID COPY CE
cruiting, non-season practice and the team's high-scoring offense. 31 1 E. LI B E RT
financial assistance to basketball
players. St. Bonaventure and This is not a new role for De-'
Florida State Universities and La Moss, now in his 19th season as a COPIES WHILE YOU
Salle College were put on pro- Purdue assistant, as he took over AS LOW AS 6/1 Oc Pe
bation Tuesday. for Mollenkopf for two games in
The NCAA made a number of 1961 under similar circumstances. DROI IN OR CAL
policy changes and recommenda- At that time Mollenkopf had to go 662-3748
tions during its three-day fall to the Mayo Clinic because of a
meeting in St. Louis. The recom- colon infection.____
mendations are to be acted upon DeMoss has received immuniza-
during the association's convention tion shots along with other as-
this January in Los Angeles. sistants and does not appear to be LET US STYLE Y
The council voted to support in any danger. The players have H A IR TO FIT Y
an amendment requiring mem- not required immuization yet as
ber institutions to apply NCAA all of their contact with Mollen- PERSONALIT
eligibility requirements to trans- kopf has been outside. 0 8 BARBERS
fer students during the regular Mollenkopf is presently just try- 0 No Waiting
season. Such requirements n o w ing to rest, and Mrs. Mollenkopf
apply only to NCAA post-season says that this is really all he needs. The Doscola Bar
events. She said that Mollenkopf woke up Near Michigan Thea
Another amendment supported feeling ill the morning after the

were not
d there
y school
ommen-
n a stu-
a 1.55
ills in a
e a 2.5
24 ac-
be eli-
d varsity

es as for

1

feel any pressure. I think the pres-
sure is on the other teams to beat
Michigan. When you're on the top,
it's the teams beneath that feel
the pressure."
One of Mandich's greatest dis-
appointments was losing to Cali-

fornia. "We were a much better .
team than we showed. I can't Big Ten
really say what was wrong-it was.
just a real bad day."
We haven't had too many bad MICHIGAN
days since then; in fact, we Ohio State
haven't had any. And Mandich has Minnesota
been a major factor in the Wol- Indiana
verines' success. The stadium's be- Purdue,
coming a very nice place to be on Iowa
Saturday afternoons . . . with Michigan State,
Mandich's help, we may all be Northwestern
spending one Saturday afternoon Illinois
in California real soon. Wisconsin

Stanidings

P

On,
re
eeks ago,
since."
s estab-
Ord while
ad only
956. In-
triumph
in the
ader is
only the
aid De-
ss."

UNION-LEAGUE MISS THE MASS MEETING?
THERE IS STILL TIME TO GET ON THESE THREE FLIGHTS
FLIGHT 1 May 4 DETROIT-LONDON Sabena
June 1 BRUSSELS-DETROIT
FLIGHT 2 May 8 NEW YORK-LONDON Sabena
Aug. 17 BRUSSELS-NEWYORK
FL IGHT 3 June 29 NEWYORK-LON DON Pan Am

W L Pet.,
3 0 1.000
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2 1 .667
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1 2 .333
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0 3 .000
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1

I

I

U 161 %;11 1 1 of

Aug. 14

PARIS-NEW YORK

NTER
rY
WAIT
r Copy
LL

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Come to the UAC Offices on the following days
FLIGHT 1-Nov. 5
FLIGHT 2-Nov. 6
FLIGHT 3-Nov. 7
ALL FLIGHTS $220
Rebate if plane fills
QUESTIN--CALL 662-4431 EXT 23

..

l

1

l

9 '

'OUR
OUR
Y
rbers
tre

------------

1. MICHIGAN'.. at North-
western (pick score)
2. Michigan State at Ohio State
3. Iowa at Minnesota
4. Illinois at Purdue

12. Oregon State at Stanford
13. North Carolina at Air Force
14. Memphis State at Tulsa
15. Auburn at Florida
16. Colorado at Kansas

5. £ndiana at Wisconsin ' 17. Washington State at Arizona
S. Army at Penn State.18. Southern California at Oregon
7. Houston at Georgia
8. UCLA at Tennessee 19. The Citadel vs. Davidson at
9. SMU at Texas Charlotte, N.C.
10. Arkansas at Texas A & M 20. Emory & Henry at Hampden-
11, Pennsylvania at Harvard Sydney
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