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October 29, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-29

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Tuesday, October 29, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Tuesday, October 29, 1 96S THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

PRESIDENTIAL HEADACHE
Conservatives may dominate

91st Congress

WASHINGTON (A) - The next
president of the pnited States ap-
pargntly w ill be forced to deal
with a Congress primarily domi-
*nated by conservative Democrats
and Republicans from the West
and South.
Some faces will change in the
Nov. 5 balloting. But in anything
short of a presidential vote land-
slide the congressional establish-
ment probably will remain essen-
btially the same. With minor shifts,
its leaders will retain their prior-
ities and its committee chairmen
their power.
In next weeks three-Way pres-
idential showdown, no responsi-
ble politician forsees the kind of
popular-vote s w e e p President
'Johnson rolled up in 1964. His vie-
tory helped increase Democratic
house strength from 255 in the
88th congress to 294 at the start
of the 89th.
As a result Johnson got a fly-
ing start on his "Great Society"
program. But when the 1966 elec-
*tions reduced the Democratic
House strength to 247, the infor-
mal conservative coalition took
major matters into its own hands.
Republicans who began this
year's campaign with predic-
tions t h e y would capture as

many as 40 house seats - more
than the,31 they need to control
the machinery - have fallen sig-
nificantly silent on this score re-
cently. They concede privately
that their presidential nominee,
Richard M. Nixon is not providing
any effective coattails and that
Republicans elected to the house
generally won't owe him political
debts beyond the call of party af-
filiations.
If the GOP won numerical con-
trol, this would be likely to reen-
force the conservative coalition.
But the prospects are that t h e
Senate will remain in Democratic
hands in any event.
The same coalition would. face
the Democratic nominee, Hubert
H. Humphrey, if he wins the White
House, even though both houses
remain in Democratic hands.
George C. Wallace, the candidate
of the 'American Independent par-
ty, would have no designated party
support in Congress.-,
Nixon already has taken into
account the difficulties he might
encounter from a Democratic-
managed congress.
He said in Grand Rapids; Mich.,
Oct. 23 that "the people are poor-
ly served when they divide politi-
cal responsibility in Washington."

He voiced the view that the op-
position would try to deny politi-
cal credit to the president forini-1
tiating policies, would inflate the
executive's proposals enough to
compel a veto or would pigeonhole
much of his program.
Humphrey has been listing do-
mestic problems he will tackle if
he becomes president, an endeav-
or that has led Nixon to condemn
what he calls "the reckless spend-
ing policies of Mr. Humphrey and
his gang."
Unless-the mood of the country
changes, the 91st Congress is like-
ly to be just about as, economy-
minded as its predecessor. While
it seldom balks at military spend-
ing, it is certain to take an inten-
sive look at the cost of Nixon's
proposals to close what he calls
a security gap with Russia.
Nixon has m a d e the implied
pledge to build m o r e bombers,
more tactical aircraft, more nu-
clear submarines and enlarge mili-
tary stockpiles. Unless the fighting
in -Vietnam were ended this might
involve defense appropriations ex-
ceeding the record $71.9 billionI
Congress voted earlier this month.
In listing the "gaps" between
Russian and U.S. defense - which
Humphrey denies exist - Nixon
said that the Soviets have deploy-
ed an antimissile defense system.
The proposed American coun-
terpart to this system obviously is
going to be a bristling issue in the
90th.
Having called for a reduction in
the tax burden, if Nixon is the
new president he Will have to de-
cide how far to go with an anti-
missile system of unproven value.
Sen. Richard B. Russell, (D-
Ga.), said a conservative estimate
of eventual cost of any general
protective system would be $40
billion. Senate Democratic leader,
Mike Mansfield of Montana, has
told his colleagues such a system
would cost at least $50 billion to
$70 billion.
And Sen., Stuart Symington, D-
Mo., said the outlays "could wreck
our economy.";

Nevertheless, 31 Democrats and
15 Republicans voted on Aug. 1
to approve $227.3 million to start
building a "thin" protective sys-
te at an ultimate cost of $5 bil-
lion-plus - which even its sup-
porters say would be only good
enough 'to meet a limited Red
Chinese threat in the 1970s.
Only 22 Democrats, including
the party's vice presidential nom-
iness, Edmund S. Muskie of Maine,
and five Republicans opposed this
outlay.
The kind of trouble Humphrey
might have in the new Congress
with social welfare legislation was
graphically illustrated on March
11 when he had to break a tie in
the heavily Democratic Senate to
prevent extinction of the Head-
start program for preschool child-
ren.
On that day 30 Democratic sen-
ators and 12 Republicans lined up
to authorize $25 million for Head-
start. Twenty-one Democrats and
21 Republicans voted "No." Hum-
phrey's "aye" made the difference.
The "no" votes against what is
generally recognized as one of the
most successful of the "Great So-
ciety" programs were supplied pri-
marily by Southern and Western
Democrats and Western Republi-
cans.4
If. as most observers predict,
Nixon is elected President and
both House and Senate remain in
Democratic hands, the- country
would return to a position of divi-
ded government. similar to that
With the exception of two years
under Truman and Eisenhower's
first congress, -the DemocraticE
party has consistently held a!
majority in the House since the
Roosevelt era.
However, during this entire per-'

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Glee ClubJoint Concert

Symbolic protest
Police lead away one of several demonstrators in London Sunday
after he splashed himself with red paint to simulate blood. A
total of 30,000 students and citizens participated in the non-
violent demonstrations.
ARIZONA CAMPAIGN:
Goldwater leadsC i
tough Senate race

iod, except for the early days of PHOENIX, Ariz. OP) - Arizon-1
the Roosevelt administration and ans are being told a vote for
the two years following Lyndon Barry Goldwater is an endorse-
Johnson's 1964 landslide, the ment of the Grand Canyon and
working majority has remained the spirit of the Western pioneers.
with the Republican conservative The message comes from an ob-
and Southern coalition. viously well-financed campaign to

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BelRmon challenges Monroney
in Oklahoma senatorial contest

OKAHOMA CITY UP) - Sen.'
A. S. Mike Monroney is battling
for political survival in Oklahoma'
against a strong challenge from
former Gov. Henry Bellmon, the,
man who broke the Democratic
party's iron grip on the state.
Most neutral observers rate thel
contest a toss-up.
Both men are popular and both
are proven vote-getters. Bellmon;

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was elected in 1962 as the state's disavowal he probably will draw :
first Republican governor since a relative handful of votes.
statehood, winning easily. Oklahomans generally are view-,
A 47-year-old ex-Marine, Bell- ed as more hawkish than dovish
mon began mapping plans for his on Vietnam and both Monroney
campaign against Monroney when and Bellmon are campaigning;
he left office in January of 1967. long and hard on the war issue.
Monroney, 66, a former reporter, Monroney has said that Bell-
has served six terms in the House mon advocates turning, conductj
and three six-year stints in the of the war over to military au-
Senate. He's been winning con- thorities. Such a course, Monroney
gressional races since 1938, most said, "would escalate the danger,
of them by comfortable margin, of an all-out nuclear war leading
The Monroney-Bellmon race is to the destruction of civilization."
complicated by the presence of a Bellmon, in turn, harks back to
third entant, George Washington,
a follower of George Wallace. a visit Monroney paid to Vietnam
washington, a Tulsa attorney four years ago.
making his first political race, is "Oklahomans still, remember the
counting on enthusiasm for the senator's well-publicized govern-
American Independent party being ment-paid trip to Vietnam in De-,
built up by the former Alabama cember 1964, after which he made
governor. a pronouncement...that the,
Neither Bellmon nor Monroney U.S. was winning and the war was,
has taken notice of Washington in his words, 'Nothing more than
in the campaign, although Wal- a mopping-up operation,'" Bell-'
lace is expected to get at least mon said.
25 per cent of the presidential He said Monroney "is eva4ing
vote in Oklahoma. the, difficult choice of telling the
But Wallace, during an appear- people of Oklahoma whether he is
ance in Oklahoma, disavowed all still satisfied with the way Lyn-
American Independent party can- don Johnson has been running!
didates in the state. So unless the war on whether he has switch-
Washington can convince voters ed to Hubert Humphrey's dovish
they should disregard Wallace's position."'

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return Goldwater to the U.S. Sen-
ate, where he served for 12 years
before trying unsuccessfully for
the White House four years ago.
Roy Elson, 38, a Democrat mak-
ing his second try for the Senate,
is fighting hard to beat the Re-
publican Goldwater. In 1964 he
lost to GOP Sen. Paul Fannin.
Elson forces acknowledge they
are trailing but say the spread is
only from 4 to 8 points:
The campaign styles of the two
men differ sharply.
Goldwater, 59, hammers away at
crime in the streets and the need
for leadership to end the war in
Vietnam. These were chief topics
of his 1964 presidential campaign,
and he says history has proven
him right.
But a hangover from that cam-
paign as to his stance on use of
nuclear weapons still haunts him.
In 1964 he suffered from his
famous "defoliation" r e m a r k,
which he said was erroneously in-
terpre ted as advocating use of
nuclear weapons in Vietnam.
Last month an Arizona news-
paper ran an article on a ,Gold-
water visit, quoting the Republi-
can candidate as saying that if
the peace talks fail the nation
should go all out for military vic-
tory.
Goldwater had to follow this up
with a message to the newspaper
explaining he wasn't advocating
use of nuclear force.
Elson has concentrated almost
entirely on state issues, espec-
ially funding of the newly auth-I
orized Central Arizona Project.
The Democratic candidate 'has
ttacked Goldwater's voting re-
cord as being contrary to the in-
terests of Arizona, development of
national defense and the space
program.

the
news toda
b)The Associated Press and Colege Pres Serice
THE UNITED STATES apparently continued to press
efforts to end the Vietnam War yesterday.
The Hanoi government is reportedly considering a new
U.S. proposal more generous than anything offered in the
past. Consulations between U. S. Ambassador Elsworth Bunk-
er and South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van Thieu con-
tinued.
Meanwhile, hope was reportedly building in Moscow for
an early end to U.S. bombing of North Vietnam. Japanese
sources in the Soviet capital said Premier Alexei N. Kosygin
was optimistic about the prospects for peace. He was quoted
as saying peace talks are now "at a very delicate stage."
In Washington, the Defense Department was reported to
be delaying the announcement of a dramatic demonstration
of U.S. ability to airlift troops to Asia, in order to avoid dis-
ruption of peace moves.
THOUSANDS OF CZECHOSLOVAKS marched through
the streets and squares of Prague yesterday in defiance
of Soviet occupation forces.
The roving demonstrators shouted "freedom" and "Rus-
sians go home."
It was the first outbreak of massive demonstrations since
August and there were fears Russian tanks and troops would
be used to crush this latest manifestation of anti-Soviet feel-
ing:r
Furthermore, there was speculation in some circles that
the demonstrations would jeopardize the promised withdrawal
by winter of the Russian troops.
THE NEW YORK TEACHERS' STRIKE passed
through its 22nd day yesterday with no immediate end
in sight.
Suspended governors, of the experimental Ocean Hill-
Brownsville school district suggested informal talks be re-
sumed and demanded a seat at the bargaining table.
Developments over the weekend brought some optimism
to the strike-torn city.
Firemen and policemen ended their slowdowns and Albert
Shanker, head of the United Federation of Teachers present-
ed a "peace plan" for the school system.
In general, the plan called 'for a return to conditions
which existed on Oct. 11, the day the latest teachers' strike
began.
SOVIET SPACESHIP SOYUZ 3, with cosmonaut Geor-
gy Beregovoy aboard, continued to orbit the earth yeter-
day after its unmanned sister ship, Soyuz 2 was brought
back to earth.
The flight was officially reported to be aimed at develop-
ing space docking techniques essentihl to Soviet plans for
sending a man to the moon.
Television transmissions from the ship were broadcast
on Soviet TV. There was no indication how long the flight,
now three days old, would last.
There was some speculation yesterday that another
launching might be involved in the current space test.
U.S. GOVERNMENT INVESTIGATORS have cited the
Air -Force for uneconomical practices in the use of mill-
tary equipment.
The General Accounting Office, the auditing arm of Con-
gress, has reported that the Air Force junked about $6.7 mil-
lion worth of damaged equipment, most of which could have
been economically repaired. Examples given were of relatively
small mechanical equipment used on Air Force bases.
The office's report said three out of every four pieces of
equipment scrapped could have been repaired for significantly'
less than the cdst of new equipment.
THE CURRENT ESPIONAGE SCARE in West Ger-
many has lead to a top level review of the country's in-
telligence services.
Chancellor Kurt Kiesinger and Foreign Minister Willy
Brandt will take personal charge of the investigation.
The move came in response to deep concern among Nortli
Atlantic Treaty Organization countries over the wave of ar-
rests, suicides, mpsterious deaths and disappearances of mill-
tary and governmental personnel in the past month.
U.S. Defense Secretary Clark Clifford last week described

the situation as a very serious matter.
RICHARD M. NIXON forecast yesterday that he will
surprise the pollsters with his showing in next week's
presidential election.
He asserted that the public opinion polls, which show
Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey cutting into his lead,
failed to measure the intensity of his workers and supporters.
Campaigning in Albany, New York, Nixon said he seeks "a
clear vote of confidence" and a "mandate to govern."
Meanwhile, in an attempt to woo Ohio's 26 electoral votes,
Humphrey told voters there yesterday that they owe a victory
to the late John F. Kennedy because, they went for Nixon in-
stead of Kennedy in 1960.
In California, latest polls showed Nixon leading Humph-
rey by 16 per cent in the race for the state's 40 electoral votes
* . *0
TWO KEY LEADERS of Kennedy-McCarthy-Mc-
Govern forces in the state yesterday endorsed Vice Pres-
ident Humphrey for President.
Prof. Otto Feinstein of Wayne State University and state
Sen.-Roger Craig (D-Dearborn) said they were forced to make
the endorsement because of positions taken by Richard Nixon
and George Wallace.
THE COMMERCE DEPARTMENT yesterday reported
a $282.2 million surplus of exports over imports for Sep-
tember.
However, government officials conceded this surplus is
too little and too late to keep 1968 from being a relatively poor
year for foreign trade.
This year's trade surplus is expected to reach $1.5 mil-
lion - the lowest since 1959.

The self-described moderate lib-
eral cites his 15 years as an ad-
ministrative aide to Arizona's.
Sen. Carl Hayden as a better qual-
IIfication than Goldwater's two
terms in the Senate.
R. H. Philipp, Owner! If elected, Goldwater contends,
his status as a former -senator
ar the hospitals would give him seniority in the
H ES, SALADS, SOUPS Senaterover other newsly elected
:HES,~~ SLDsenators.
SPECIA L Democrats, pointing out that El-
't il 8:00 p m. Daily son is 1 years younger, suggest he
would have plenty of years ahead
UN DAYS of him to build up the seniority
which made Hayden powerful.

3rd
WEEK

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41

c5 Hart s
GeffHeart, is agjonel 9'Hunter*

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