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October 27, 1968 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-27

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Sunday, October 27, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pace Nine

Pnn~~ Ninp

w

liich igan

u ggernaut rolls on

(Continued from page 1)
second quarter, or passing wildly
as they did in the third, the
......Gophers replaced quarterback Phil
:.:.:;..:.::. Hgen with Ray Stephens and got
back into busness.
Stephens, the younger brother
of former Minnesota All-American
Sandy Stephens, has always been;
a strong runner but had a scatter-
arm and a tendency to fumble.
4 , However, yesterday, when he fi-
nally got into the game, he hit
Chuck Litten with an 88-yard
scoring pass, passed and ran to
set up the Gopher's second TD,
and threw nine yards to Barry
Mayer for the final touchdown.
All the Minnesota scores, com-
ing quickly in the fourth quarter,
made Coach Elliott consider put-
ting the first team back in to
stem the tide. But he never did,
and a 16-yard run by Lance
Scheffler towards the end of the
game gave the Wolverines enough
ball control to stop any even in-
Ssinificant chance of a Minnesota
4 ~ 'victory.
After 'the contest, Minnesota's
usually volatile Coach Murray
ily-Andy Backs Warmath was uncharacteristically
st inside the communicative. He said "we just
er of yester- got beat by a team that was a
the "butter- whole lot better than we were. We
,ceptions for wouldn't have beaten this team
playing in Minneapolis or any-
___ _ where else."
"Go fer' the roses

"
I

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
PAT ATKINS
BILL DINNER

*

*

*

*

*

-Dai
SUDDENLY STICKY-FINGERED end Billy Harris snares a 22-yard scoring strike ju
end line from quarterback Dennis Brown. The touchdown, coming in the second quart
day's encounter, pushed the Michigan lead to 24-0. Harris, who all season has endured
fingers" label from the Michigan constituency, finished the afternoon with three r
85 yards.
U. -

The 1'ruckin'
Bob Lees ..
. So there we were, sitting in the stadium yesterday after the
first quarter of the game.. I happened to glance up at the flags rep-
{ resenting the Big Ten schools which ring the stadium.
Minnesota's was at half-mast.
The symbolism, as they say, was apt. For the first half, in fact,
the statistics looked like Michigan was playing Michigan. Of the total
of 78 plays from scrimmage (not including punts), 54 were run by the
Wolverines. And only eight of all those plays started in Michigan
territory -five of them by the Wolverines on their way to scores.
The game was kind of weird. Michigan's Tim Killian, for in-
stance, missed the PAT attempt his first time out, so the Wolverines,
went after two-point conversions the rest of the way. Yet Killian set
a Michigan record with three field goals in one game.
Another type of kick set the scene for a strange play. At 6:54
of the third period, Michigan's Mike Werner punted to Dennis
Hale. He tried the old play of faking a handoff to a back going the
other way in order to get running room - and it worked, as all
the Wolverine defenders followed the wrong man. So Hale, all,
alone, took off laterally to position himself - and fell down. Not'
only that, but the blocker before him was called for clipping,
and the Gophers were 15 yards further,into their hole.
That's the way it went for the Gophers. At one point, quarter-
back Phil Hagen lateraled to halfback George Kemp, who dropped
". back and lofted one deep for flanker Mike Curtis. Curtis got it all
right -, Michigan safety Tom Curtis, that is. The Wolverine back,
turned in two such jobs yesterday, as five Gopher passes were picked
off by Michigan - almost half as many as the Minnesota receivers
caught.
Hagen finally got desperate about two-thirds of the way through
the third quarter, as he decided to call a basketball play - a bounce
pass. Or at least that's how it looked. Here's what ,happened:
Hagen rolls left. He gains about four yards and Michigan's Henry
Hill hits him. Thinking quickly, he bounces the ball forward right at
one of his guards, but guess who's there? Tom Curtis, ready to inter-
cept anything he sees. And he does.
The stats call it a fumble recovery, but I'm not convinced.
To me, it looked like Hagen was trying to find a new way -- any
way - to move the ball forward.
The final score was 33-20, which sounds kind of close. It really
wasn't, however, but at least we didn't "pour it on them," as Minne-
sota coach Murray Warmath accused us of doing two years ago.
It's a good thing we didn't, or else I don't think Warmath would
have handed the Little Brown Jug over to us.
He would have smashed it.
Paying for /the Other Guy's Accidents ?
Save on your Auto insurance
For those who qualify--
$25,000 B.I. and P.D. $1,000 Medical Expenses
and Uninsured Motorists Protection

STATISTICS
M
FIRST DOWNS
Rushings
Passing
Penalty
TOTAL NO. OF RUSHES
NET YARDS - Rushing
Passing.
FORWARD PASSES
ATTEMPTED.
Completed
Intercepted by
Yards interceptions
returned
TOTAL PLAYS
(Rushes and Passes)
PUNTS, Number.
Average distance
KICKOFFS, returned by
YARDS KICKS RETURNED
Punts
Kickoffs
FUMBLES, Number
Ball lost by
PENALTIES, Number
Yards penalized
MICHIGAN 12 1
MINNESOTA 0 0

UICH.
28
17
9
2
77
252
201
30
14
5
51

MINN.{
19
9
29
149
200
34
12
1
10

Werner

Punting
No.
4
MINNESOTA

Warmath added, "Southern Ca-
lifornia and Michigan are the best
ball teams we faced."
Actually,reven with Minnesota's
last quarter comeback against the
Michigan second string, the Wol-
verine defeat of the Gophers wasj
much more impressive than USC's.
The nation's number one team
was only able to defeat Minnesota
29-20 on a late come-from-behind
effort sparked by O. J. Simpson.
Elliott, meanwhile, was convinc-
ed that just about every single
player on his team had an out-
standing game. He said "we 'act-
ually triednothing new, nothing
that Minnesota hadn't seen be-
fore, but whenever you score 30
points in the first half, it's got
to be a great half."
Captain Ron Johnson, figured
he was going "all the way down
to Columbus and on to Pasadena
and then no more Maize and Blue
for me."
By now, there are all sorts of
explanations for.- the miracle ,of
1968, when Michigan lost its first
game and won its next five, com-
pared to the nightmare of 1967,
when the Wolverines won their
first and lost their next five.
Offensive backfield coach Tony
Mason had called it "one more
year of maturity for key b a 11-
players and increased experience."
And then somewhere in t h e
heart of the matter has to be
the fact that Michigan has not lost
a fumble all year.
After all, in a year when the
Wolverines can break a record for
field goals, anything can happen.
..For Michigan fans, the o n 1y
thing that was disappointing !was
that there weren't enough of
them. The thirty-thousand empty
seats represented one of the poor-
est attendence figures for Home-
coming of recent years.
Perhaps it was the cold weather
and threatening skies. But if that
was true, then it is clearly evi-
dent that the older generation-
the alumni who annually return
for this game-are going soft.

Yards Ave.
151 37.7

Spartans shatter Irish dreams;
Buckeyes avert Il inibush wack
By The Associated Press rally led by fullbacks Rich John- made one apiece. Keyes dashed 51
EAST LANSING, Mich. - A son and Ken Bargo. yards for one of his.
rugged Michigan State defense Jeff Trigger intercepted a Kern
stopped Notre Dame quarterback pass on the Ohio State 30 early EVANSTON, Ill.-Craig Smeet-
Terry Hanratty at the one-yard in the second half and Johnson on, a second-string halfback, feat-
line in the last minute yesterday carried on 5 of the next 6 plays ured a 7-yard drive with his run-
and preserved a 21-17 victory over to get Illinois on the board. John- ning and capped it by taking a 3-
the fifth-ranked Irish. son also ran for the two extra yard scoring pass as Northwestern
The Irish, who had been aver- points. rallied in the last quarter for a
Sagingupset, ee the heavypravor- Another Illini drive in the 13 to 10 victory over Wisconsin.
te ps et, wnee ntheheavyn avre- fourth quarter saw Illinois move The loss stretched the Badgers'
ites and had been beaten pre- 80 yards for another touchdown winless string to 16 games. They
viously this season only by Purdue to make it 24-22 with Bargo going are 0-6 for the campaign with four
37-22. the final two yards. Bargo then games to go, thus being assured of
Michigan State showed it was smashed into the end zone for two a fifth straight losing season-
going to shoot the works for a extra points and a 24-24 tie, with their worst in 79 years of football.
victory right from the start when 4:38 left. Northwestern's winning drive in
it gambled o4 an onside kickoff., *? 15 plays, keyed on Smeeton's runs
The Spartans recovered the ball
andhent iartns rrds t scor, LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Purdue, of 10, 8 and 15 yards, broke a five-
in without completing a single pass, game losing streak for the Wild-
tailback Tommy Love barreling in overwhelmed the Iowa Hawkeyes cats.
the last 11 yards for the touch- 44-14 yesterday and cracked two * * *
down. Big Ten football rushing records. BOMNTNId;d
down, in the third quarter, rsigrcrs BOOMINGTON, Ind - Indiana
when the Spartanstwere trailing Purdue passing ace Mike Phipps scrambled for 10 points in the
17-14, Coach Duffy Daugherty sat out. the game with an ankle fourth period yesterday and nip-
gave another gamble order. injury. ped Arizona 16-13.
On a fourth down situation Don Kiepert, No. 2 Purdue quar- Quarterback H a r r y Gonso,
with four yards to go, sophomore terback, brilliantly directed the chased by four Arizona players,
quarterback Bill Triplett faked a Boilermakers through 92 ground heaved a desperation pass 11 yards
pass, rolled out and picked up plays that produced 483 yards, to Jade Butcher in the end zone
the yardage. Love again bucked seven touchdowns and 32 first to put Indiana ahead with 3:39
in for the score from the one to downs. left.
make it Michigan State 21, the Purdue's All-American Leroy The three-point difference was
Irish 17. Keyes and Jim Kirkpatrick scored a 22-yard field goal by Indiana's
* two touchdowns apiece. Kiepert, .Don Warner midway in the final
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Undefeated Perry Williams and Stan Brown quarter.
and second-ranked Ohio State, on
the threshhold of a season wreck-

Stephens
Mayer
Kep
Hagen
Bowser
Curtis
Carter
Forte

Rushing
Tries
6
7
6
51
'1
2
Totals 29

s Net
51
46
29
25
4
3
--4
-5
149

107 63
4 5
37.7 31.4
3 7
146 143 Hagen
54 13 Stephens
92 130
0 3
0 2 :
8 3
49 41 Kent
Parson
A 3 0-33 Litten
0 0 20-20 Mayer
Curtis
Trawick
Forte

:s

Passing
Att. Comp. Int.1
15 5 3
19 7 2
Totals 34 12 5
Pass Receiving
No. Yards'
1 112
2 24
4 114
2 24
1 10
1 12
1 4
Totals 12 200
Punting
No. Yards
5 157

Ave.
6.5
6.6
4.8
5.0
4.0
3.0
-4.0
-2.5
Yards
56
144
200
Ave.
12.0
12.0
28.5
12.0
10.0
12.0
4.0
Ave.
31.4

ing tie, rallied in the final min-
utes yesterday to hand underdog
Illinois a 31-24 defeat.
A homecoming crowd of 56,174
hoping only for a good showing
by the Illini, saw their winless
favorites bounce ; off a 24-point
deficit to tie the mighty Buck-
eyes with 4:38 left to play.
But the desperate Buckeyes, with
quarterback Rex Kern leaving the
field with an injury, struck quick-
ly to dissolve the tie and hold a
share of the Big Ten lead.
Ohio State had only a 3-0 first
quarter lead on Jim Roman's 21-
yard field goal but the Buckeyes
struck for three touchdowns, two
by Kern and one by Otis, to climb
into a 24-0 lead at the half.
Then Illinois put on its amazing

(By the author of "Rally Round the Flag, Boys!",
"Dobie Gillis," etc.)
THE WINDS OF CHANGE
ARE GIVING ME A STIFF NECK.

MICHIG

GAN

Johnson
Brown
Craw
Sipp
Scheffler
Moorhead
Brown
Moorhead
Total
Harris
Staroba
Mandich
Johnson
Imsland
Gabler
Dutcher
Sipp

Rushing
Tries
33
11
6
16
4
Totals 77
Passing
Att. Comp.
20 11
10 3
s 30 14
Pass Receiving
No. I
3
1
4
2
I
1
1
Totals 14 2

Net
84
45
31
12
48
33
252
Int.
0
1
1
Yards.
85
8
48
20
15
16
6
3
201

Ave.I
2.5
4.0
4.4 Pribyl
2.0
3.0
8.2

Big Ten Standings

i

0

Yards
152
49
201
Ave.
29.3
8.0
12.0
10.0
15.0
16.0
6.0
3.0

MICHIGAN
Ohio State
Minnesota
Indiana
Purdue
Iowa
Michigan State
Northwestern
Illinois
Wisconsin

w
3
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
0
0

L
0
0
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
3

Pct.
1.000
1.000
.667
.667
.667
.333,
.333
.333
.000
.000

i

t
y _
4
- .r
t

i

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AFFAIRS
4-7442

1. You sure are my kind of
folksinger, Fran.
"Oh, a lonely minstrel
I'm meant to be..."
3. I've always
admired you.
"Forever to roam
is my destiny..."
5. But I guess you're just too
wrapped up with your music.
"Alone, yes, alone
constantly..:"

Y-,
2. Y'think maybe you and me
could, uh, possibly...
"A-singin' my song
to humanity.. ."
a 4
4. And I was hoping that
perhaps, somehow, the
feeling might be mutual.
"Without an need for
company...
6. It could have been beautiful,
because I just got one of
the great jobs Equitable is
offering college people
these days. Real good pay,
challenging work, and
promotions that come as
fast as I can earn them.
Like to hear my version
of "Lead Me Down
the Aisle, Lyle"?

Today if I get a little misty, I hope I Imay be forgiven.
This is an anniversary; it is exactly fifteen years since
I started writing this column in your' campus paper.
Fifteen years! What a pageant of memories marches
through my mind as I sit this day on my verandah, my
faithful wife crouched at my feet, my hot line to Medicare
within easy reach! What changes I have seen in American
college life! What strange new things--the teaching
machine, the disposable dean, the rise of Eugene ... the
Moby Grape, the naked ape, the hairy nape, the Carnaby
drape, the generation gape ... the Grateful Dead, the acid
head, the tiger tread...the electric sitar, the menthol
cigar, the come-as-you-are. And, of course, the Electro-
Coated Blade.
The Electro-Coated Blade, which is to say the new
Personna Super Stainless Steel Blade, is mentioned here
because the makers of the new Personna Super Stainless
Steel Blade are the sponsors of this column, and they are
inclined to stop payment on my 'check if I omit to mention
their product.
Not, mark you, that it is any chore for me to sing
the praises of Personna, for it is a seemly blade that
shaves a you cleanly, a gleaming blade that leaves you
beaming, a trouble-free blade that leaves you stubble-free.
If you seek facial felicity, if you yearn for jowl joy, try
Personna today. It is available both in double-edge style
and in Injector style, both styles Electro-Coated with a
new process invented by Personna's resident mad sci-
entist, Steinmetz Ampere, who also invented the oppos-
ing thumb, without which millions of castanet players
would be destitute today.
But I digress. We were discussing the changes in col-
lege life during the last fifteen years. Let's take up one
change i4 particular: the emergence of a new breed of
admissions dean.
The old breed of admissions dean (and they are still
a majority) admit freshmen on the basis of standard,
cut-and-dried criteria: IQ score, SAT score, high school
standing. But the new breed of admissions dean occa-
sionally will take a chance on an applicant with a low
IQ, a low SAT score, low high school standing. He looks
not so much at a man's test scores as at the man. If the
dean's intuition tells him that within the man are hidden
qualities, something rare and special that would enrich
the college, the man gets in, test scores notwithstanding.
Take, for example, the case of Champert Sigafoos.
Champert's credentials for college were not what you
would call promising. He graduated 419th in a high
school class of 419. His IQ was 14; his SAT score was
12. Also he was bald on one side.
Nevertheless Champert trudged from campus to cam-
pus, showing his dossier to admissions deans. Everywhere
the result was the same: projectile vomiting.
Then one day Champert came to a campus where the
admissions dean, E. Pluribus Ewbank, was one of the
new breed. "Champert," said Dean Ewybank, "my intui-
tion tells me that within you are hidden qualities, some-
thing rare and special that would enrich the college."
"You're out of your bird," said Champert.
"No, Champert," said Dean Ewbank, "I know whereof
I speak, for I am not only the dean of admissions here,
but I am also the basketball coach. And the hidden quali-
ties I see within you are that you are seven feet three
inches tall."
So Champert was admitted. It did not, alas, work out
as well as it might have, for Champert shortly developed
acromez-alv (a mnrhid fear nf honie nnd wna drnnnpd

,2282 SAB

76

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