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October 27, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-27

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Sunday, October 27, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Sunday, October 27, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

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Forget Something ? UN IN-LEAGUE
Like UAC MASS MEETING for
EUROPEAN FLIGHTS
Come in and sign up in the UAC offices

RECURRING ISSUES:
Public employe strikes

I

I create New

York havoc

FLIGHT NO. 1
Nov 5
FLIGHT NO. 2
Nov. 6
FLIGHT NO. 3
Nov- 7

May 4
June 1
May 8

Detroit-London
Brussels-Detroit
New York-London

Sabena Jet

1

Sabena Jet

August 17 Brussels-New York

June 29

New York-London

Pan Am Jet

August 14 Paris-New York

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Subscribe To
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 764-0558

NEW YORK ()) - The New
York school system, with 1.1
million pupils, lies crippled by
the third teachers' strike since
Sept. 9.
The police, who want more
money than a new contract pro-
vides, began a work slowdown
and the firemen have followed
suit.
If the police are successful in
their bid for still bigger salaries,
the garbage collectors will try,
too, and may strike.
So,indthe nation's biggest city,
where an atmosphere of public
crisis has become almost norm-
al, things are almost normal.
Mayor John V. Lindsay was
ushered into office on Jan. 1,
1966, by the first bus and sub-
way strike in city history.
New York has been plagued
ever since by a seemingly end-
less series of work stoppages in
public and private sectors, some
serious, some merely annoying.
There have been longshore-
men strikes, tugboat strikes,
taxicab strikes, theater strikes,
and moving van strikes. From
time to time employe slowdowns
have hit the Long Island Rail-
road, which transports 900,000
commuters to and from the city
each working day.
For a while in January, 1967,
the city couldn't even bury its
dead, when 1,700 gravediggers
and other employes struck for
three weeks at 39 cemeteries in 0-
the metropolitan area.
The subway trains and buses
normally carry 4.5 million pas-
sengers daily. The strike which
greeted Lindsay left them with-
out regular transportation for
12 days in winter weather.
The final settlement came
Iwith a wages and benefits pack-
age whose cost to the city Lind-
say estimated at $52 million over
a two-year period.
The teachers struck for 14
school days last year over wages.
This strike also was illegal un-
der state law. A court fined the
union $150,000 and jailed it s
ONLY
DATING COUPLES
can do it!
Tues, Oct. 29, 7:30 P.M.
Wed., Oct. 30, 7:30 P.M.
in Auditorium C
Mr. Rubin 663-7788 or 764-8360

president, Albert Shanker, for 15
days with a fine of $250.
As school opening neared this
year, the union complained over
the discharge of 19 member
teachers by a community school
board entrusted with the oper-
ation of eight schools in a, de-
centralization experiment.
The Brownsville-Ocean Hill
community school board claim-

ed that the teachers it f i r e d
lacked rapport with the stu-
dents, most of them black.
The union so far has called
three stoppages and the central
- board of education has suspend-
'd the experimental community
board. The board, ignoring the
suspension, still is running its
schools.
The threat of slowdowns or
work stoppages by policemen,
firemen and sanitation workers
came on~ly hours after the city
thought it had satisfied all three
in contracts negotiated 1 a s t
sunday.
Officers of the police union,
the Patrolmen's Benevolent As-
sociation, accepted the con-
tract but union delegates turned
it down..
John Cassese, president'of the
P.B.A., said the delegates ob-
jected to the city policy of sa-
lary parity among regular po-
liceman, firemen, city housing
development policemen and cor-
rection officers.
The delegates, Cassese said, ar-
gued that city patrolman should
receive more than the others
because their work It more haz-
ardous.
John J. DeLury, president of
the Uniformed Sanitationmen's
Association, declared that if the
city reopened the police contract
his men would expect similar
treatment.

Mayor Lindsay

.a .".".. V: . .":::"-... ::t-......"::-...

Military seeks means
to attract, volunteers

2 EXCITING NEW PLAYS!.
A p werfu1 and prophetic An imaginative and
play by the darinq youn provocative new play by
Czech libera leuder the author of
(19B7 Praueuccess -- '~ Blackboard Jungle.'
THE WORLD PREMIERE OF
# w
IVANNKIA
Aapted b T D / Ad T FAR E AN H NT R
TUE. E MON., FEB. 3-0AT., FEB. 8
Directed by
$'sti'ngushed iad Eway Casts! MARCELLA CISHEY

WASHINGTON (o)-The Pen-
tagon's manpower chief said
yesterday his experts are taking
another look at methods avail-
able for attracting volunteers
for the armed forces.
"We want to minimize the
number of draftees and maxi-
mize the number of volunteers,"
Alfred B. Fitt said in an inter-
view.
Fitt, assistant secretary of de-
fense for manpower, denied the
re-examination is aimed at sub-
stituting an all-volunteer mili-
tary force for the draft.
Fitt said "it is our current
judgment that in order to main-
the
MUSIC SHOP
717 N. University
663-7375

tain the quality and size of the
force we need the draft."
But, he said, "we want to
make sure we are doing every-
thing possible" to stimulate vol-
untary recruiting.
Among the courses of action
recommended in past studies
are increases in military pay
and allowance, better housing,
educational opportunities and
other benefits.
Military pay is probably the
biggest obstacle to greater vol-
unteer recruitment. It has been
estimated it might cost $8 bil-
lion or more to raise military
pay scales to a level high enough
to attract enough volunteers to
do away with the need for the
draft.
Fitt denied his aides are stu-
dying the problem with an eye
to eliminating the draft.
He recalled a 1965 study which
had as its objective finding ways
to develop an all-volunteer
force. This study came to the
general conclusion that the
draft was essential, in part of
stimulating enlistments.

the
news today
by The Assoated Press and College Press Service
THE SOVIET UNION LAUNCHED yesterday its first
manned spacecraft in 18 months and reported a success-
ful rendevous manuever with an unmanned sister ship
launched a day earlier.
The flight, which came just four days after the splash-
down of the 11-day U.S. Apollo 7 mission, brought Cosmonaut
Col. Georgy Beregovoy automatically within 600 feet of the
unmanned craft, which he then approached under manual
control.
There was no mention of a linkp and Beregovoy did not
say how close he came to the sister ship, prompting specula-
tion a planned hookup might have failed.
Moscow sources speculated, however, that another space-
craft might join the cosmonaut in orbit before the mission
ends. Russia has been planning to transfer a cosmonaut from
a manned to an unmanned ship after a linkup.
HANOI'S PUBLIC CRITICISM of President Johnson's
Vietnam position has failed to convince administration
sources that North Vietnam will reject his secret peace
proposal.
Despite yesterday's first Communist attack in -a month
at a U.S. firebase north of Saigon, government sources ap-
peared optimistic that North Vietnam's private exchanges
through diplomatic channels would achieve a breakthrough
in the Paris talks.
Publicly, Hanoi has denounced Johnson's Thursday news
conference, at which he hinted secret negotiations are mak-
ing progress, as a ruse "intended to deceive public opinion."
NEW YORK POLICE voted yesterday to heed a court
order and end their work slowdown.
But the city's firemen threatened to escalate their slow-
down into a full-scale strike Nov. 13 unless the city meets
their wage demands.
The policemen, who were ordered by a 'court Friday to
cease the slowdown, said "we cannot in good conscience arrest
someone tomorrow if it is.said we are violating the law our-
selves."
State law forbids strikes by pubic employees.
The police started their work slowdown last week, in a
protest over wages. Up to 10 per cent of the force called in
"sick" while others refused to issue any parking or traffic
violations.
RICHARD CARDINAL CUSHING angrily announced
yesterday he will resign as Archbishop of Boston because
of criticism he has received for defending Jacqueline Ken-
nedy Onassis' marriage.
Cushing had said earlier this week "why can't she (the
former Mrs. Kennedy) marry whotever she wants to marry"
and discounted as "a lot of nonsense" talk that she should be
excommunicated from the Catholic church for marrying a
divorced man.
The cardinal has since received severe public criticism
for his stand.
ISRAELI AND EGYPTIAN FORCES were reported
fighting yesterday in Israeli-held territory in the Sinai
desert, and'artillery battles flared over the Suez Canal.
Ground fighting was reported by Israeli army sources.
Spokesmen for both countries charged the other started the
artillery duel, and Cairo Radio claimed Israel destroyed /sev-
eral houses with surface to surface guided missiles. Israel re-
ported six soldiers killed and seven wounded.
The battle coincided with widespread civil disorders in
occupied West Jerusalem, in which Israeli troops armed with
batons and shields fought demonstrators.
The fights followed two weeks after Israeli Foreign Min-
ister Abba Eban proposed a nine-point settlement of the
Middle East crisis in the United Nations. Part of the, plan
called for a non-aggression pact among Israel and the Arab
states.
Center for Chinese Studies presents
Dennis Twitcheft

speaking on
The Tunhuang Manuscripts
and the
Study of Chinese Social History
OCTOBER 28 4:00 P.M.
Room 200 LANE HALL
Mr. Twitchett is a Professor of Oriental History
at Cambridge University
Hear-
the UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
and UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
GLEE, CLUB CONCERT

DIAL 8-6416
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U ND E R G R O U N D
Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun.-''11:00 P.M.
N-separate admission required

at the Vth Forum
5th Ave. at Liberty, 761-9700

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not recommended for anyone over 30 years of age

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EXPANDED CINEMA is a revolution. A new way of seeing.. A new way of thinking. A new
way of being. The image is the idea is the word, is the act. Expanded awareness. A taste of
the essences. Expanded Cinema says it. It says: Revolution.

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
Harold Pinter's
H THE
HOMECOMING

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MAIN STREET-a moment of sexual desire stretched in time so as to make fun of itself-psy-
chedelic background.
REPORT-by Bruce Conner--an underground film-maker's examination of President Kennedy's
assassination.
BRATS-Laurel and Hardy play themselves and their sons. Very funny.
PIECE MENDALA,-END WAR-one love making act which is seen simultaneously from both sides
ofv its spce d borihth ends. of its time.

Saturday, Nov. 9

7:00 and 9:30

Hill Auditorium
BLOCK SALES
Begin Thursday, Oct. 31
Hill Auditorium Box Office
Open 8:06 until 5:00 every day
MAIL ORDERS

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A~. ~t US S -

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