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October 24, 1968 - Image 12

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-24

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Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 24, 1968

Heber- Smith

Project boosts ghetto legal aid

MAX

By ELIZA PATTERSON
A program conducted this sum-
mer by the University's Law School:
might supply the nation's ghetto
residents with the type of "respon-
sive legal aid" they have long
needed.
The program, the Reginald
Heber-Smith Law Project, recruits
and trains socially responsible law
school graduates and sends them
to county and dity legal aid clinics
around the country.
Sponsored by the Office of
Economic Opportunity, the pro-
gram trained 38 recent graduates
from 22 law schools in courses-
ranging from welfare to tenants
rights.
Officials of the program hope
the Heber-Smith fellows will gen-
erate a more militant spirit in the
usually conservative personnel
staffing the nation's legal aid
clinics.
"Traditional legal aid clinics are,

timid and too inaccessable ti
poor," charges Prof. Rober
Harris who co-directs the prog
"The legal aid offices look
themselves as providing the :.
of the poor but not as an inti
part of the war against pove
The OEO's present legal aid
gram hires lawyers and secret
to serve indigent clients for
problems as divorce, ado]
housing, and criminal misden
ors. To qualify for the servi
single person must earn less
$3,500 per year, and couples
than $4,500 per year ' with
exemptions for each child.
By all indications the H
Smith project has succeede
boosting the effectiveness o
neighborhood legal aid c
Prof. James White of the
School who co-directs the'pr
with Harris says the trainin
been "beneficial in that the

dents are able to stimulate other
offices to bring in new ideas." 1
White also feels the project has
given the young lawyers training;
they need to examine and reform
the law, in addition to applying
the law.]
Harrison Fitch, one of the two
black lawyers in the program and
now working in a Boston clinic,
also feels the program has been a'
success.
"We are as a group, an organ-,

gram as "one of the finest of its terests was to stir up, in the law
kind in existence." Thus far, they faculty, more interest in poverty
say, no major problems have I law," Harris says. He believes they
arisen. have been successful.

However, their situations are
special, because they are free to
pick and choose their cases. They
have no supervisor and are free
to plan legal strategy as they wish.
Houseman, though, criticized
the training offered at the Uni-
versity, saying, the courses were
"too theoretical and did not offer

In the past the University law
school has offered only one course'
in the law of the poor. This year
there is an additional course of-
fered by professors White and
Kennedy. Next year, Harris hopes
to add a third course in Welfare
law.
Because OEO and the University
law school consider the program

program lasted a year, the first
five weeks were devoted to classes
and the remainder of the term to
actual work in the clinics.
-

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ization that is needed, a shot in enough on the use of- substantive
1st.ntr *x

s less the arm to the legal clinics," Fitch'
$500 says.
However, Fitch thinks the pro-
eber- ject, could be improved if moreI
ed in blacks participate. The lack of
f the black participation might be due
linics. to the fact "the program was not:
Law well enough publicized," he says.:
roject Both Alan W. Houseman and
g has Thomas L. Smitson, Smith Fellows
stu- working in Detroit, regard the pro-

'w. a success, they will continue it
In welfare law one works at the next summer with 250 students at
expense of ;the poor, and thus, it a university not holding a summer
is important to be efficient. The school, so that the students may
two fellows claim the courses of- all be housed together. The In-
fered here failed to teach this ef- stitute of Continuing Legal Ed-
ficiency. ucation will administer the pro-
But the Heber-Smith program gram.
appears to be doing more than The first Heber-Smith program
just training ghetto lawyers. began at the University of Penn-
"One of the OEO's greatest in- sylvania in the summer, 1967. The

INCORPORATION:
Newell sets terms
for release of funds

(Continued from Page 1)
Vice President and Chief Financial
Officer Wilbur Pierpont.
The statement cited Section 8.5
of the State Constitution as the
legal basis for Regental control of!
funds.
The section creates the Regents
and states this board shall have.
"control and direction of all ex-
penditures from the institution's!
funds."
"The question is not whether
SGC can incorporate," the state-
North wood
tenants seek
hou ing planI
(Continued from Page 1)
brought up other problems t h a t'
will have to be dealt with at the
Committee meeting tomorrow.
Chief among them is the charge
that at least 20, per cent of North-
wood's residents can afford to live
in non-University housing.
Related to this is the charge
made by association president
Alan Cline,,grad., that some of the
people living in Northwood are
not even connected with the Uni-
versity any longer.

ment noted, "such a move might'
in fact be a very good thing."
"The question is only whether
SGC can transfer University funds
to the corporation," the statement
continued.
Council member Carol Hollens-
head said Mrs. Newell's action
represents "a vestige of in loco
parentis." Miss Hollenshead said
Mrs. Newell is "giving us our al-
lowance as long as we're good
children."
At the SGC meeting, Davis in-
troduced a motion formally cen-
suring Mrs. Newell for her "out-
rageous act," but action on the
measure was postponed until next
week in accordance with normal!
Council procedure.
In other action, Council passed
a resolution supporting the SACUA
amendment to the Committee on
Communications Media "deleting
the power of the Board in Control
of Student Publications to make
senior editor appointments for The
Daily.'
Neff also introduced a motion,
to be voted on next week, asking
SGC to reaffiliate with the Na-
tional Student Association (NSA).
E. 0. Knowles said he strongly
opposed the measure since "there
is nothing NSA can give to us.
However, Gayle Rubin, who at-
tended the national convention in
August said NSA was doing "some
exciting things."

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