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October 23, 1968 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-23

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Page Eight
from
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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, October 23, 1968

The Daily Offical Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITER form to
Room 3528 L. S. & A. Bldg., be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information call 764-9270.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23
DayCalendar 1
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar: "Management of Managers, Pro-
gram No. 71": North Campus Comions,
8:15 a. m.
Anatomy Seminar: Stanley G a r n ,
Center for Human Grow and Develop-
ment, Univ. of Michigan, "The Peculiar
Behavior of Tubular Bone at the Endo-
steal Surface 'It Giveth and It Taketh
Away", 1:10 p.m., 2501 East M1edical
Bldg.
Botany Seminar: Dr. Larry Williams.
Botany Department will speak on
"Genetic and Physical Relationship
Between Two Early Steps of Pyrimidine
Synthesis", on Wednesday. Oct. 23, 1968
at 4:15 p.m., 1139 Nat. Bcl. Bldg.
Student Laboratory Theatre (Depart-
ment of Speech): Kenneth Koch's The
Construction of Boston and Sam Shep-
ard's Red Cross: Arena Theater, Frieze
Building, 4:10 p.i.
Fall Art Lecture Series: How New Is
Modern? - Joel Isaacson, Assistant
Professor of Art History, "Contemporary
Directions": Amphitheater, Rackham
Building, 7:30 p.m.
School of Business Lecture Series:
Thomas-J. Schriber, Assistant Professor
of Statistics, School of Business Ad-
ministration, "General Purpose Sim-
ulation System/360: Introductory Con-
cepts and Case Studies": Auditorium
130, Business School, 7:30 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program: APA
Repertory Company in Sean O'Casey's
Cock-A-Doodle Dandy: Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theater, 8:00 p.m.
School of Music Concert- University
Symphony Orchestra, - Joseph Blatt,
Conductor: Hill Auditorium, 8:00 p.m.
General Notices
I -
Broadcasting/ Service: WUOM Radio
(91.7 Mc.) 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily,
Wednesday 11:00 a.m. The Elev-
enth Hour (repeated at 7 p.m.) Ed Bur-
rows hosts an hour of news and con-
versation about the arts and literature.
Guest: Gertrude Kurath on American
Indian music and dance. Wednesday.
1:00 p.m. The U-M Conference on Ag-
ing: Dr. Charles M. Gaitz. on "Health
in Old Age", and M. Powell Lawton on
"The Psychological Status of the Eld-
erly". Dr. Gaitz is from Baylor College
of Medicine; Mr. Lawton' from the
Philadelphia Geriatric Center. Wednes-
AIRPORT

day 4:45 p.m, Canipus News, produced
by speech department students. Wed-
nesday 5:00 p.m. The Press and World
Affairs, with Prof. Ben Yablonky. Wed-
nesday 8:00 p.m. U-M Symphony Or-
chestra Concert, Josef Blatt conductor,
broadcast live from Hill Auditorium.
Thursday 1:00 p.m. U.S. Foreign Poicy:
The Next Decade, "Within the Western
Alliance", with ABC News Commenta-
tor Joseph C. Harsch, recorded at Ore-
gon State University. 4:45 p.m. Con-
servation Report with Prof. Karl Lag-
ler. 5:15 p.m. U-M Feature Story with
Jack Hamilton.

yy
I
7

I s
STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL,'t
The approval of the following stu- C
dent sponsored events becomes effec-A
tive after the publication of this notice.
All publicity for these events must be S
withheld until the approval has be- I
come effective. Approval request forms a
for student sponsored events are avail- $
able in rooms 1001 and 1546 of the f
Student Activities Building. V
UAC - North Campus Comm: Mixer,.r
October 11, 9-12 p.m. Bursley Cafeteria. r
Ann Arbor Motorcycle Assn.: Off-the-r
road GYMKHANA, October 20, 1 p.m.,
N. Campus. :
Christian Science Organization: Lec-
ture, October 22 - 8 p.m. - UGLI Mu 1ti-
Ipurpose Room.,
Alpha Gamma Delta: Doughnut sale,
October 23. 9 a.m., to 5 p.m., Fishbowl.A
Committee for Improved Education:
Bucket Drive, October 23, 1968, 8 a.m. E
tok4 pm. All campus.
Young Socialist Alliance: Lecture and
short film. October 24. 1968, 7:30 p.m.
Multipurpose Room, UGLI.
Indian Students' Association: Movie.
October 26. 1968, 7:30 p.m., Natural Sci-
ence Auditorium.
German. Exchange Scholarships: A
limited number of scholarships a r e
available for one year of graduate study
ip Germany for the 1969-70 school
year. Candidates must have completed
a bachelor's degree by the end of the
summer term, 1969. be proficient in j
German. and should have a well-de-
fined purpose for wishing to study in
Germany. The scholarships apply to;
any field of study and rpay be used for
research activities by advanced gra-
uae students. Awards range from 400
DM t 800DM per nmlqpth, plus round-
trip transportation. Applications a r e
available at the Scholarship Office, 2011
SAB; the German Department, 1072
Frieze Building: and The International
Center. 603 E. Madison Street. Deadline
for submission of applications is No-'
vember 2. 1968. For additional informa-
tion, contactMr. LaVine, Internationalj
Center. 764-2137.
Secondary Directed Teaching Stu-r
dents: Those students planning on do-
ing their directed teaching during thes
Winter Term, 1969 who have not re-
ceived a note in the mail to report to
the Directed Teaching Office or re-I
turned their supplementary applica-
tion form, please stop as soon as pos-+

in 292 U.I.S. If we do not hear 7
you by Friday. October 25, we
ssume you do not plan on doing C
directed teaching during t h e e
r Term. 1969. w
Co-Recreation activities cancelled e
'riday, Oct. 25th due to Homecom- g
Dance. Activities will resume on
y, November 1st.T
cool of Music Concert: 1968-1969 e
val of Contemporary Music; Cham- b
Music. Bethany Bearslee, guest ar-
Schuller's "Music for Brass Quin- A
James Dapogny's "Variations,"
Fortner's "Nocturne." and Schoen- I
s I ierrot lunaire." Rackham Lec- 1
Hall, Friday, Oct. 25, 8:00 p.m,
higan College Workshop on Hu- c
Relations: Students are invited to a
cipate in this Workshop, Novembern
Clear Lake Camp, Dowling, Mich- t
(sponsored by the National Con-
e of Christians and Jews). Five
arship grants to cover the cost of t
Vorkshop are available through ther
e of Religious Affairs, 2282 S.A.B.I
y immediately.I
a Shots: There will be a "FluI
Clinic at the Health Service,
sday, October 24, from 8:00 - 11:30c
and 1:00 - 4:30 p.m. The charge is
for students and spouses and $2.001
aculty, staff and spouses. Persons
have had a "Flu Shot" since 1964
only one this year. Persons whoS
re a second, injection this year s
obtain it at this time.
gents' Meeting: November 15. Corn-
Ications for consideration at this
ing must be in the President's
ds no later than October 31.
ntal Health Research Institute
nar: Alex Inkeles, Professor of
ology, Harvard' University. "Be-
ng Modern: A Cross-National Re-
ch on the Individual in the Mod-
zation Process," Thursday, October
3:45 p.m., Auditorium, Children's
.hiatric Hospital.
story Department Lecture 5: Some
cts of Negro American History:
Robert Fogelson, "Rioters and
;raints: Reflections on the Negro
tto, Thursday, October 24, 4:15 p.m.,
itorium A, Angell Hall.
Doctoral
Examinations
iomas Lee Sadosky, Industrial En-
ering, Dissertation: "Prediction of
e Time for Combined Manual and
[on Tasks," on Wednesday, October
10 a.m. in Room 2260 Fluids Bldg.,
irman: W. M. Hancock.
Placemen t
3200 S.A.B.
GENERAL DIVISION
tte Addition to Interview Schedule
Friday, October 25:
,w York University, Graduate School
Business Administration, N.Y.C. -
day. Men and women. BS/BA in
disciplines for MBA and PhD in
ness Administration.
rrent Position Openings received
reneral Division by mail and phone,
nterviews held on Campus for these
ings, contact Placement Services,

64-7460 for application information: Engrg. Pekg. Engrg degree, or Chem..
Minnesota Mining and Mlanufacturing food tech, phys. Operations Researchf
ompany, St. Paul, Minn.: Positions for Analyst MA and 2 years industrial or
ngineers in all disciplines, BS levels consultant exper.. Fortran exper.
with 2-5 years exper as usual. Some International Harvester Co., Lansing,
diting positions for journalism de- Mich.: Zone Credit Representatives for
rees. Acetg. positions. Lansing area, acctg., bus. ad., econ., orc
State of Connecticut:t Public Health finance degree, interest in credit and1
Therapy Consultant, degree, and sev- fin, mgmt.,
ral years in public health fields. Apply State of Michigan: Disability Ex-
before Oct. 32. aminer, several levels, BA or MA in
City of Minneapolis: Engineering related area and 1 or 2 years exper. iFn-I
Aide, some college engineering. ancial Institutions Examiner, degree inI
Norwich Pharmacal Company, and acctg., and 1-2 years exper.
Eaton Laboratories Division, Noawich, General Motors Institute, Flint,
N.Y.: Positions in areas of scientific res. M o CrcuituT eratornfo
and manuf., inc., biol. sci., Q.C., and Aio: oedCircuit TV Operator for
chemistry, Administrative positions in Isual dept.
acctg., personnel, production and tech- Local Area for Detroit Firm: Sales
nical mgmt. Salese positions and in- Representative for established district,
ternal division. . 50 mile traveling radius, man, no spec-
National Labor Relations Board, ific degree, pref. .some sales exper., but'
Wash. D.C.: Labor Management Rela- will train regardless.
tions Examiner, field examinet. BA with Hannepin County Park Reserve Dis-
min. 24 hours in areas of labor rel., trict, Minneapolis, Minn.: Park plan-
indust. rel., personnel admin., econ., ner, landscape arch degree and 2 years
labor law, poli. sci., acctg., or low. exper.
FSEE is required. This is one of the
positions for which the NLB is re- SUlMMER PLACEMENT
cruiting here on campus Nov. 5. SERVICE
State of Washington, Architect. BA 212 S.A.B., Lower Level
in arch. or arch, engrg., and 5 years ex-..
per. Cook County Department of Public
Ralston Purina Company, St. Louis, Aid will hold group meeting for stu-
Mo.: Home Economist, BS. Sr. Account- I dents interested in summer work on
ant, CPA req. Food Tech., BS. Pckg. Thursday, October 24, at 4:00 p.m.

Industrial Nucleonics Corp.
Johnson & Johnson
McDonnell Douglas Corp.
Douglas Aircraft Div.
Astronautics Cb. - Western Div.
McDonnell - St. Louis, Mo.
Owens-Illinois, Inc.
Philco-Ford Corp. -Acronutronic Div.
Sangamo Electric Co.
Sundstrand Corp.
Uarco Inc.
U.S. Gov't.
Naval Weapons Center
Housing & Urban Dev. - Make appt.
at Placement Services, 3200 SAB.

GRAPE BOYCOTT'

Sign up and get details at 212 S.A.B. : ?((C $ ? : C .?y a9
for this meeting.
Winant Volunteers, N.Y.C.: Meeting ' - 9
Thursday, Oct. 24, at 7:30 p.m. at S.P.S., n U *Z
212 S.A.B. for students interested in
work in Europe. Please call 764-7460, or
come to SUS if interested, we should6
know how many students are interested Kanga-oo, Sheepskin
before the meeting. 45
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT SERVICE Namda &-Navaho
128 H, West Engrg. Bldg.Na d & N v h
jMake interview appointment at Room V
128 H. West Engrg. Bldg. unless-other-
wise specified.
OCTOBER, 30, 1968
Celenese Corp. 663-4540
General Electric Co. - Ph.D.
General Motors Corp.
Hercules. Inc.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, October 23, 1968

MEETING
7:.30 Wednesday
Union Room 3Y

i

"I

4

I

DEBATE AND QUESTIONS

'Mgx

TIE
'Er

MARVIN
ESCH

I BERT
GARSKOF

WESTON
VIVIAN

2452 E. Stadium at Washtenaw
Ann Arbor
DIAL 663-8800
NEW HOURS
DAILV-6:30 AM TO 10PM
TILL 1:00 AM FRI. & SAT. NIGHT

We Make
Luscious Deserts

CANDIDATES FOR CONGRESS
MON., OCT. 28 8:00 P.M. UNION BALLROOM
SPONSORED BY-SGC Voter Registration,
College Republicans, Young Democrats, CNP

Now serving Mediterraneon Cuisine
featuring
chef Theodoros from Athens
Famous for our Greek Salad and Taste Te npting Desserts
Daiy Classif ied s GetResults

m

U-.

/

I

STUDENTS

Bethlehem Steel
Loop Course Interviews:

LIMOUSINES
for information call
971-3700
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Trips/Day

I

I

11

SPECIAL RATES FOR WEEKENDS
438 W. Huron 663-2033
- - a

C747
What is the Bethlehem Loop Course? It is our ma
with bachelors' or advanced degrees.
The course starts early in July with four weeks of
Pa. Loopers attend lectures on every phase of the cc
visits to a steelplant.

4

NOVEMBER

6

"Wars will end when young
men refuse to fight"
There will be a meeting 8:00 Wednesday at 802
Monroe (basement) for those considering non-
cooperation with the draft.
SPU-Resistance

ir[

I

nagement development program for graduates
f orientation at our home offices in Bethlehpm,
orporation's activities, and make almost daily

Steel Plant Loopers, who coniprise ,a majority of the average loop class of 150 to 200 graduates;
proceed to various plants where they go through a brief orientation program before beginning
their on-the-job training assignments. Within a short time after joining the course, most loopers
are ready for assignments aimed toward higher levels'of management.
How about other loopers? Our Sales Department loopers (30 or so) remain at the home office for
about a year of training. Most are then assigned to district offices where they take, over established
accounts.
Fabricated Steel Construction loopers are trained in a drafting room, on a field erection project,
in a fabricating shop, and in an engineering office. A looper's first! work assignment is based on
interests and aptitudes disclosed during this program.
,Loopers in Accounting, Shipbuilding, Mining, Research, Traffic, Purchasing, Finance and Law,
General Services, and Industrial and Public Relations go through training programs tailored to
their types of work.
Where would YOU fit in? Check your degree or the one most similar to it.

'1

LOOKING FOR A MEANINGFUL CHALLENGE?
LOOKING FOR SELF-FULFILLMENT?
If you are between 18 and 30
PARTICIPATE

SH ERUT LA'AM
Volunteer Service Corps for Israel
ONE YEAR
If you are a professional, college graduate or
undergraduate, you orehneeded as a teacher,
instructor, tutor, technician, nuse, social worker,
etc.
For an experience in communal living you may
loin the full year Kibbutz program on a border
Kibbutz or elsewihere. -
ORIENTATION AND ULPAN
Knowledge of Hebrew not essential. Before de-
parture there is an orientation seminar followed
by a three-month Ulpan, intensive Hebrew study
in Israel.
COST
$670 round-trip air fare and orientation costs.
NEXT DEPARTURES
July, 1969 for Prof. and Semi-Prof.
Sept., 1969, Kibbutz Participation.
Limited number of partial loans. Available to
professionals only. .

SHERUT LA'AM SPECIAL
NEW PROJECT.
TWO YEARS
If you are a professional, college graduate or
undergraduate entering your junior yea, you can
paticipate in one year of work followed by one
year of study at an institute of higher learning
in Israel. Year of study will be covered by ode-
quate scholarship; same cost as one-year pro-
gram; same departure dates.
VOLUNTEERS FOR
ISRAEL PROGRAM
(V.I.P. )
Any assignment upon arrival in Israel, living and
working in a Kibbutz or Moshav with the possi-
bility of Special work projects or border Kibbutz
placements arising from new circumstances in
Israel.
HEBREW, LECTURES AND
SEMINARS AVAILABLE
COST'
$570 ound-trip air fare.
NEXT DEPARTURE
January 1969 and approximately every four
months thereafter.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING-Engineering or me-
chanical maintenance departments of steel plants, fabri-
cating works, mining operations, and shipyards. Fuel lnd
combustion departments. Supervision of production oper-
ations. Marine engineering assignments in Shipbuilding
Department. Also: Sales-or Research.
METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING - Metallurgical
departments of steel plants and manufacturing operations.
Engineering and service divisions. Technical and' super-
visory positions in steelmaking departmenis and rolling
mills. Also: Research or Sales.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS-Technical and supetvisory
positions in coke works, including production of byprod-
uct chemicals. Fuel and combustion departments, includ-
ing responsibility for operation and maintenance of air
and water pollution control equipment. Engineering and
metallurgical departments. Steelmaking operations. Also:
Research or Sales.
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING -Positions in steel
plants, fabricating works, shipyards, and mines. Engi-
neering and maintenance departments. Supervision of
steelmaking, rolling, manufacturing, and fabricating
operations. Also: Sales.
CIVIL ENGINEERING: Fabricated Steel Construction
assignments in engineering, field erection, or works man-
agement. Steel plant, mine, or shipyard assignments in
engineering, construction, and maintenance. Supervision
of production operations. Sales Department assignments
as line salesman or sales engineer (technical service to
architects and engineers).

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING-Steel plant, fabricat-
ing works, mining operations, and shipyard electrical
engineering, construction, and maintenance departments.
- Technical and supervisory positions in large production
operations involving sophisticated electrical and elec-
tronic equipment. Also: Research or Sales.
MINING ENGINEERING - Our Mining Department
operates coal and iron ore mining operations and lime-
- stone quarries, many of which are among the most mod-
ern and efficient in the industry. This 10,000-man activity
offers unlimited opportunities to mining engineers. Also:
Research.
NAVAL ARCHITECTS AND MARINE ENGINEERS:
Graduates are urged to inquire about opportunities in our
Shipbuilding Department, including the Central Techni-
cal Division, our design and engineering organization.
Also: Traffic.
OTHER TECHNICAL DEGREES-Every, year we re-
cruit loopers with technical degrees other than those listed
above. Seniors enrolled in such curricula are encouraged
to sign up fob an interview.
ACCOUNTANTS-Graduates in accounting o' business
administration (24 hours of accounting are preferred) are
recruited for training for supervisory assignments in our
3,000-man Accounting Department.
OTHER NON-TECHNICAL DEGREES - Graduates
with degrees in liberal arts, business, and the'humanities
are invited to discuss opportunities in the Sales Depart-
ment. Some non-technical graduates ray be chosen to fill
openings in steel plant operations and other departments.

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NOW'S THETr tTIME O SIN U P FOR AN INTERVIEWAitd -rhen yovnii oter at the niace_-

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