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October 22, 1968 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:'
PHIL IBROWN

I

Daily-Peter Dreyfuss
BILLY HARRIS (80 above left), hauls in one of four catches against Navy in his greatest perform-
ance of the year. But his most crucial reception was against Indiana last Saturday, when he took a
touchdown aerial from Dennis Brown to give the Wolverines their winning points in a 27-22 victory.
SNARES A BOMB:
Harris catch keys Indiana win

U.S. SW
MEXICO CITY RP) - United
States swimmers continued to
dominate t h e i r specialties in
Olympic competition yesterday,
collecting six more medals includ-
ing two gold and scoring their
fourth 1-2-3 sweep of tile Games.
Meanwhile, the Americans wrap-
ped up two gold medals in yacht-
ing and another silver in shooting
events.
Doug Russell of Midland, Tex.,
started the American swimming
sweep with a :55.0 clocking for
the gold medal in the men's 100-
meter butterfly, whipping across
the finish line just ahead of team-
mates Mark Spitz and Ross Wales.
Spitz, of Santa Clara, Calif., a
bronze medalist in the 100-meter
freestyle, took the silver award and
Wales, of Youngstown, Ohio, cap-
tured the bronze.
Russell's time matched the
Olympic mark he set in the trials
of the new event. Spitz was clock-
ed in :56.4 and Wales in :57.2.
It was the first time Russell had
ever beaten Spitz in a race.
"I thought I could beat Mark,"
Russell said, "and I was deter-
mined to do it tonight. I was
swimming for the United States
and if I had not got a medal, I
would not have returned to the
United States but I would have
gone to some desert island."
Previously, the United States
had finished 1-2-3 ,in the men's
200-meter individual medley and
the women's 100-meter freestyle
and 200-meter 'butterfly with
America's Ellis Daniel of Elkins
Park, Pa., and Sue Shields of
Louisville, Ky., taking the silver
and bronze medals.
Miss McClements' winning time
was 1:05.5 with 18-year-old Miss
Daniel finishing in 1:08.8 and the
1-year-old Miss Shields across in
1:06.2.'
Holland's Ada Kok, world record
holder in the event with a 1:04.5
finished fourth in 1:06.2.
America's 800-meter men's free-
style relay team gave the U.S.A
its 11th swimming gold medal
with Yale's Don Schollander
swimming the anchor leg for its
victory over Australia in 7:52.3-
two tenth of a second off the
world record. The Soviet Union
was third.
The world mark was set by an-
other Schollander-anchored team
in the 1964 Games at Tokyo.
Buddy Friedricks of New Or-
leans finished first in yesterday's
final Dragon class race, officially
sealing the yachting gold medal
he had clinched on Sunday.
Skipper Lowell North of San
Diego, Calif., and crewman Peter
Berrsett of Seal Beach, Calif., took
the Star class gold, wrapping it
up with a first place finish in the
final race after clinching it on
points Sunday.
Michael Page of Briarcliffe,
N.Y., won a bronze medal in yes-
terday's equestrian competition
with the United States team
claiming a silver.

Tennis ace Ashe' sparks local exhibitio

By BILL DINNER
Anti Arbor tennis fans were
given a rare treat Sunday when
the top three members of the U.S.
Davis Cup team joined forces with
the Michigan tennis team and
presented a fine exhibition.
A small, but select and knowl-
edgable crowd of about 2500 got
a good idea of the great abilities
of the Davis Cup team's members.
In the opening match. Charles.
Pasarell, ranked number one by the
USLTA, combined with Michigan
sophomore Roman (Cholo) Al-
monte against Michigan doubles
"champs Pete Fishback and Brian
Marcus.
In the main match, reigning U.S.
Open champion Arthur Ashe faced
Clark Graebner, who was a semi-

finalist at Forest Hills. Graebner
has been out of action for the past
two weeks with a strep throat
and showed little enthusiasm.
. Ashe, who is at his worst on in-
door courts, was especially both-
ered by the glare from the ,lights.
He summed up his opinion of the
courts in two words: "Simply ter-
rible!"
Possibly the best show was
taking place on the sidelines, how-
ever. The ball boys rounded up
for the match were young and in-
experienced. There were plenty of
balls around for Ashe and Greab-
ner to use, but the ball boys never
seemed to have them.
Graebner, usually the first to be-
come upset, remained calm dur-
ing the first set. Ashe, already'
troubled by the lights, was further

disturbed by the boys and gave
the first set to Graebner, 6-3.
In the second set Graebner
couldn't stay calm as the boys
destroyed the remnants of concen-
tration. But Ashe had apparently
decided that the ball boys had to
be a joke, so he ignored them the
best he could as he whipped
Graebner 6-1.
In the deciding set action picked
up on all fronts with the boys
rivaling the players for top billing.
But the match was won by the
players as both Graebner and Ashe
found the feel of the court. Ashe
equaled Graebners powerful serve
and beat him with' beautiful net
strokes to take the third set and
the match 6-3.
In the final match Graebner
and Pasarell teamed up against

simmers on

Olympic

I -

NFL Standings

Western Conference
Central Division
W L

L

DETROIT
Minnesota
Green Bay
Chicago
Co
Los Angeles
Baltimore
San Francisco
Atlanta

3 2
3 3
2 3
2 4

astal Division
6

i0

5 1
3 3
1 5

T
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
a
a

By JOEL BLOCK
Billy Harris did not have a very
good' game against California.
Several passes were thrown his
way, some right in his gut; but he
dropped them all.
In the following three games
against Duke, Navy and Michigan
State, he ran the shuttle run be-
tween the sidelines and the Wol-
verine huddle. He was a primary
receiver, but only of Coach Bump
Elliott's messages to quarterback
Dennis Brown.
And for most of Saturday's'
game with Indiana, Harris must
have thought he was still playing
delivery boy. For three quarters
they didn't even look at him, much
less pass to him.
Then with less than five min-
utes left to play in the game
Harris ran his familiar "steak"
pattern into the Indiana end zone.
This time the ball , was there to
greet the junior end and this time
he caught it to give Michigan its
blue chip security touchdown and
eventually/a, 27-22 win.
The play was no classic in grid-
iron history; hell, Jim Seymour of
Notre Dame could show you a
score of ABC videotapes of recep-
tions, each longer and classier
than the 36-yarder Harris caught.
But that pass, besides being a
personal victory for Harris, was
good example of what Michigan is

doing this year that, they haven't
done in the past three.
It was the clincher, the knock-
out, the last piece of sod on the
opponent's grave. Michigan is no
longer running scared in the
fouth quarter; they are, in effect,
kicking the other guy when he's
down.
The Wolverines finished off
Michigan State in a similar man-
ner last week. Behind by one point
in the fourth quarter, Brown used
a helter-skelter version of Mich-
igan's "pro zip right curl" to con-
nect with Jim Mandich on a 53-
yard scoring toss.
The Indiana game also showed
that Michigan's depth problems
are mostly on paper, not on the
field. Elliott was forced to use,
soph reserve Tim Killian in place
of starting left linebacker and
defensive captain Tom Stincic
when Stincic was kicked out of the
game for roughness.
Killian moved right into the
linebacking spot as if he played
there all his life and made 10
tackles in the second half in addi-
tion to calling the defensive
signals.r
Other rookies have replaced in-
jured starters with equal ease and
proficiency. Dick Caldarazzo has,
moved in Xor Bob Baumgartner,"
redshirted with a knee injury, at
left' guard. Henry Hill has taken
over for Gerry Miklos at middle-

guard. Cecil Pryor has switched
from a linebacker to a defensive
end to replace Jon Kramer, lost
for the season.
But there were times on the
field Saturday when Michigan was
caught with its pants down. In-
diana quarterback Harry Gonso
called several variations of a
"throwback" pass play which had
the Wolverine defenders going one
way while the pass was going an-
other.
Michigan cornerback G e o r g e
Hoey was burned badly on one of
.the throwback plays,, a 17-yard
touchdown pass from Gonso to
halfback Bob Pernell. Hoey said
in the locker room afterwards that
he made two mistakes on the play;
one, he was lured inside by an-
other pass receiver and neglected
his outside duties; and (2) once
he recovered and took a shot at
Pernell sweeping the end, he mis-
judged the unfamiliar, wide white
out-of-bounds stripe and tried to
butt Pernell out of bounds. This
failed miserably because Pernell
was several yards from the sideline
and Hoey just moved him a little
farther outside.
Still, the razzle-dazzle "inno-
vative" football which worked for
the Big Red so much last year,
failed to mesmerize the Wolver-
ines this time. Least of all, an end
named Billy Harris.

Eastern Conference
Cleveland 3 3
New Orleans. 3 3
St. Louis 3 3
Pittsburgh 0 6
Capitol Division
Dallas 6 0
New York 4 2
Washington 3 3
Philadelphia 0 6
Sunday's Results
Green Bay 14, DETROIT 14, tie
Chicago 29, Philadelphia 16
San Francisco 26, New York 10
New Orleans 16, Pittsburgh 12
Dallas 20, Minnesota 7
Cleveland 30, Baltimore 20
St. Louis 41, Washington 14
Los Angeles 27, Atlanta 14
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Eastern Division
W L
New York 4 2
Boston 3 3
Miami Z 3
Houston 2 5
Buffalo' i-
Western Division
Kansas City 6 1
San Diego 5 1
Oakland 4 2
Denver 2 4
Cincinnati 2',
Sunday's Results
Boston 23, Buffalo 6
San Diego 55, Denver 24
Miami 24, Cincinnati 22
Kansas City 24, Oakland 10
New York 20, Houston 14

Pct.
.600
.500
.400
.333
1.000
.833
.500
.167
.500
.500
.500
.000
1.00
.667
.500
.000
Pct.
.667
.500
.400
.286
.167
.857
.833
.667
.333
.286.

T
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

--Daily-Eric Pergeaux
REIGNING U.S. OPEN and U.S. amateur tennis champ Arthur
Ashe delivers his big serve in his singles exhibition match with
Clark Graehner at the Events Building Sunday. Ashe, Graebner,
Charlie Pararell, and Don Dell-all members of the Davis Cup
team-performed with Michigan varsity players in the fund-
raising show.
- - - - - -- ---

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