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October 20, 1968 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sunday, OctoEcr 20, 1968
Mic ga
igi

'"

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

wins

fourth

straight

(Continued from page 1)
"This wasn't one of our better
games," stated offensive coordin-
ator Tony Mason after the game.t
A "Nevertheless, our defense was
magnificent," he continued. "our
boys just don't quit. We were down
and we bounced right back in
there."
"It certainly was our defensive
unit which kept us in there,"
chimed Head Coach Bump Elliott.
"They won 'it for us. Hartman,
Curtis, Goss, Hill, Killian, Parks-
they all had a great game ..
Killian's performance was espec-
ially noteworthy, since he replac-
ed Tom Stincic at middle line-
backer early in the game when
Stincic was ejected for "hitting an
opponent." Killian, who had not
played previously this season,
made ten tackles.
Stincic claimed after theI game
that he had simply "grabbed" the
Indiana played in a scuffle along
the Michigan sidelines. The con-
test. was highlighted by numerous
: fights and flaring tamperson both
sides.;
The Wolverines took off .from
the opening kickoff, determined'
to wreck the Hoosier homecoming
before a sellout crowd of 51,951.
Led by captain Ron Johnson,
Michigan found the holes in In-
diana's defense to the tune of 93
yards in eight plays and a touch-
down with only three minutes gone
in the game.
Johnson carried the ball five
times for eighty-five yards on
the drive, and scored the touch-
down from 18 yards out.
,M Indiana mounted a tieing touch-
down offensive late in the first
quarter, going 80 yards in four,
plays. Sophomore fullback Hank
Pogue bulled over from the 18
for the score, but they key play
was the 57. yard scamper by the
speedy Parnell.
From then on, neither team
could push over a score until
Hoosier Don Warner kicked a field
goal five and one half minutes

into the third period which set the pared to 174 in the first two quar-

stage for Hartman's interception
heroics.
Other standouts for the Wolver-
ines included safety Tom Curtis
who 'led the team with 13 tackles
and 2 interceptions; Johnson, who
racked up 163 yards in 34' carries;
and Brown who gained 74 yards
rushing and threw the TD pass.
Johnson# tired in the last two
quarters, however, and gained only
15 yarhds in ten carries. The. en-
tire Michigan rushing attack was
bottled up in the second half,
gaining only 91 yards as com-

ters.

4

4

4

Elliott said, "Indiana is the
best offensive club we've seen this
season. It's really pleasing to win
this one from them.
"We haven't thought much be-
yond the team coming up each
week so far." He continued, "With
the type of team we have, we have
to. make progress each week."
To most of the observersat yes-
terday's homecoming contest in
Bloomington, that's exactly what
the 1968 Wolverines appeared to
be doing.

t
t

from the seat
Bill Levis
of, my pants.:.

BLOOMINGTON-It's hard to believe but Michigan actually out-
Hoosiered Indiana yesterday before the second largest crowd in IU
history.
The 51,951 spectators saw their cinderella team of last year
succumb to the upstarts of 1968, the wondrous Wolverines, 27-22.
Michigan has won four straight since its opening day loss to Cali-

'M' insa tie

FIRST DOWNS
Rushing
Passing
Penalty
TOTAL NO. OF RUSHES!
NET YARDS-Rushings
Passing
FORWARD PASSES
Attempted
Completed
Intercepted by
Yards, interceptions
returned
TOTAL PLAYS
( (Rushes and Passes)
PUNTS, Number
Average distance
KICKOFFS, returned by
YARDS KICKS RETURNED
Punts
Kicks:
FUMBLES, Number
Ball lost by
P NALTIES, Number
Yards pinalized'

MICH.
24
13
9
2
66
265
162
141
3:
92

IND.
26
14 Imsland
9 Betts
3 Johnson
53 Gabler,
265 Mandich
162 Harris
34
14
2
Werner
58
87

Pass Receiving
No.

Yards

2 40
2 10
3 19
4 41
2 16,
1 ' 36
Totals 14 162

I

tornia, but was picked by the experts to 1inish near the bottom oI the
Ave. Big Ten this year.
20
s Playboy, which had forecasted the Wolverines' record correctly
6.3 two years in a row, predicted a 3-7 season for Bump Elliott's con-
8 tingent. Now the experts are wondering if Michigan has enough to get
36 itself into the Rose Bowl.
11.3
The last time the Wolverines were 4-1 was in 1964 when they beat
Ave. Ohio State in Columbus th final game of the season to earn the trip
35 to Pasadena. It looks again like that game at Columbus will determine
the Western Conference's representative in the New Year's Day classic.

Punting

, No.
10

96
35
4
1'72
31'
41
2
0
10
8
13
9

INDIANA
Rushing

7
35
5
129
39
91
5
3
35
7-27
6-22

Tries
*Gonso 11
Isenbarger 16
Fleming 2
Pernell 16
Pogue 8
Totals 53
Passing
Att. Comp.
Gonso 32 13
Pernell,.. 1 1
Isenbirger 1 0
Totals 34 14
Pass Receiving

Net
96
47
5
93
64
265
Int.
3
0
0
3

MICHIGAN
INDIANA

7 0
0 7

Johnson
Brown
Craw
Scheffler

MICHIGAN'
Rushing
Tries
34
18
t32
Totals 66
Passing

Net
163
74
30
2

Ave.
A4.8
4.1
2.5
4.0

Ave.
5.0
2.9
2.5
5.8
8.0
5.0
Yards
146
16
162=
{ Ave.
13.6
9.6
11.6
9.5
16
10
12
11.3
Ave.
35

Butcher
Gage
Isenbarger
Pernell
Gonso
Highbaugh
Stolberg
Isenbarger

No.
3
3
3
2
, 1
.1
1
Totals 14

Yards{
41
29
35
19
16
10 7
12
162
No.
7

Brown
Totals

At. 1Comp.
30 14
30 I14 .

Int. Yards
2 162
2 ,1162

MSUndrops' homecoming game
to M'Vinnesota's Gophers, 14-13-

By THOMAS R. COPI
Special To The Daily
EAST LANSING - A dropsy
pidemic cost Michigan State its,
homecoming game yesterday, as
the Spartans lost to Minnesota
14-13.
Alert Minnesota defenders stop-
ped two MSU touchdown drives by
pouncing on bobbles inside the six
yard line.. The Spartans lost a
total .of four fumbles as six dif-r
ferent players mishandled the elu-
sive pigskin.
The Golden Gophers, who are
now 2-0 In Big Ten play, had to
play catch-up football, as they
trailed at the half, 7-0. But the
Maroon and Gold punched over,
,two quick touchdowns in the third
quarter--one on a 58 yard punt1
return by Doug Roalstad-to put
the pressure on the Spartans.
State, whose offense was visibly
deflated by the loss of key fumbles
in the game, could manage to
push over only one more score, on

a 17-yard pass from quarterbackl
Bill Triplett to Frank Foreman
late in the 'game. And the Spar-
tans, who chose to go for the win;
were foiled in their try for a two-
point conversion.,
The Gophers, ;who invade Mich-
igan Stadium next Saturday,
showed a balanced if uninspired
offense, sparked by the running
of George Kemp and the passing
of Phil Hagen. Kemp, who ran for
62 yards in 15 attempts (as well
as passing for an additional 24),
found the holes and followed his
blockers well. While not a ter-
rifically strong or fast runner,
Kemp remains Minnesota's most
potent offensive threat.
Hagen, who. completed 10 of 22
for 155 yards, had excellent pro-
tection from his offensive line.
Sometimes rolling out to pass, he
more often dropped straight back.
But even with the kind of protec-
tion Dennis Brown dreams about,
two of his aerials were picked off

by alert Spartan backs.
One of the State interceptions,
coming in the waning moments of
the first half, led to the type of
play that makes coaches' hair
stand on end, or at least keeps
them awake nights. Spartan safety
Al Brenner grabbed off a Hagen
pass on the State one-yard line
and streaked down the east side-
lines, headed toward paydirt. But
with only one man Abetwpen him
and the promised land beyond the
goal line, Brenner wildly lateraled
the ball back to lineman Bill
Dawson, who had been trailing the
play. Dawson, who has probably
never handled the ball in a game
before, didn't seem to know what
to do with it, but he fell right in
line with the rest of his teammates
.and dropped it. He kicked it
around for what must have seerhed
an eternity to Spartan mentor
Hugh "Duffy" Daugherty, before
finally covering it on the Minne-
sota 15.
Three plays later, the green and
white pushed over their first score.
As for the highly-touted Minner
sota defense, the always-danger-.
ous Spartans managed to dent it
for a total of 406 yards, including
215 on the ground. Triplett took
advantage of a weakness on the
right side of the Minnesota line by
repeatedly'running an option play
around end which was good for
over 150 yards for the afternoon.
The Spartan yardage was piled
up without the help of Don High-
smith, who, you will recall, chew-
ed: up the turf for over 100 yards
against Michigan last week. High-
smith, who saw little action, was
good for only seven yards in four
carries against the Gophers. I

After the Wolverines' homecoming encounter with Minnesota
Saturday, Michigan faces Illinois, Northwestern and Wisconsin; who
sport a combined 0-15 4ecord this year, on consecutive weekends. It's
then to Ohio State for the clash which is shaping up as the Big Ten
title maker.
Michigan didn't play one of its better games against Indiana
yesterday, but it was the kind of ball game that demonstrated the
depth and determination of this year's Wolverines, two things lacking
in recent seasons.'
When all-Big Ten linebacker Tom Stincic was kicked out of the
game near the end of the first half, sophomore Tim Killian came in
to help stymie several Hoosier drives. Two other sophs, who have
spent most of the year warming the bench, also aided the defense in
stopping Indiana at crucial moments in the second half.
Pete Newell and, Marty Huff, both who intercepted passes late
in the Duke victory, helped close the door against the Hoosiers when
John Pont's crew began its. patented fourth quarter drives.
Still, it was an aching senior and a formerly butterfingered junior
who won the game for the Maize and Blue. Safety Jerry Hartman
and split end Bill Harris sparked the victory..
,Hartman, playing all season on two gimpy ankles, got the,
Wolverines rolling in the third quarter. It was the senior's 62 yard
touchdown run after intercepting a Harry Gonso pass that brought
the seemingly dead Michigan offense out of hibernation. The Wol-
verines never relinguished the lead after that score.
"We 'were in {a zone, in pretty. tight; coverage, when I got the
pass," a weary Hartmani said after the game. "It sure seemed like a
long run." Hartman, who took the pass intended for Hoosier end Al
Gage, said he again hurt his ankles but emphasized he'll be ready for
Minnesota.
The other key player had to be Bill "Butterfingers" Harris who
couldn't find the handle against California four weeks.ago. Michigan
was ahead 20-16 with about five minutes left in the game when Harris
stepped into the picture. Dennis Brown had been overthrowing his
deep receivers all day but with third and 12 he had to try one more
time. A four point lead seems to be never enough against Indiana. The
Hoosiers, who have scored 56 points in the fourth quarter so far this
year,\seem to score on the wierdest 'plays with hardly any time re-
maining on the board.
So Brownie rolled to his right and hit "Butterfingers" ,n the right
corner of the end zorie where Harris held on to it for what proved
to be the winning score.
"I just went straight out and as fast as I could,"'a jubilant Harris
stated.
Still, it was the defense that saved the game for the Wolverines.
Offensive coordinator. Tony Mason had much praise for the unit
which held the high scoring Indiana offense to only three touch-
downs.
"They played magnificently," he asserted. Mason was not so kind'
about his own offense. "We stopped ourselves mo6re than Indiana did,"
he moaned.
Whatever the difference was yesterday, the big difference be-
tween this season and 1967 could be the number of fumbles. "We've
had only five so far this year compared with 14 last season," Mason
stressed. ''The big thing }is that we haven't lost one this season." Each
time the Wolverines; fumble, the ball comes right back to them.
,Michigan also has been fortunate as far as injuries are concerned.
Ron Johnson, who rushed for 163 yards in 34 carries, hurt his left
elbow in the contest but he said, "I just got it bumped. It's a recurring
injury and I'll be okay."
Aside from that, Michigan appeared: to have come out of the
gampe healthy. The old Wolverine nemisis, the knee injury, hasn't
visited Michigan since the Duke game.
After three straight seasons of heartaches, the:breaks are finally
falling in the right places for the Wolverines., As Hartman said,
"everybody is working together. It's a team effoit."
Right now the team is looking ahead to Minnesota. Elliott knows
the only way to win ball games is to take them one at a time.1

MICHIGAN'S DENNIS BROWN
(22) seems to be trying out for
the Olympic gymnastic team,
but actually he has just been
upended by Indiana tackler
Benny Norman (21). Wolver-
ine fullback Garvie Craw (48),'
who had been blocking for
Brown, is an interested observor
in the quarterback's flying antics
Although he was stopped this
time, Brown spent most of the.
day avoiding would be Hoosier
tacklers while rolling up 74,
yards rushing. When he wasn't
in the air himself, the Michigan
quarterback kept the football
there as he connected on four-
teen passes, two -of them good
for touchdowns, including the"
crucial toss that clinched a 27-
22 victory for the Wolverines.

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a

r

1

is
IV
>a
30
4

I., "r-f

Big Ten Standingsa

-J I

Big Ten
W L Pet. PF

All Games
W L Pet. PF PA

MICHIGAN
Ohio State
Minnesota
Indiana
Purdue
Iowa
Michigan St.
Northwestern
Illinois
Wisconsin

2
2
2
2
1
1

0
, 0
0
1
1
1

1.000
1.000
1.000
.667
.500
.500

56
58
31
88
43
75

PA
36
21
26'
75
19
38

4 1 .800 125

4.
3
3
j4

0 1.000
2 .600
2 .690
1 .800

114
89'
148
152

76
41
88
149.
74
142
167
194
176

Ashaver,,that gives.
almost twice the shaves-
per charge
is worth some study.

2 3 .400 134

1 2 .333 66 42 3 2 .600 108

0
0
0

2
2
2

.000
.000
.000

27;
24
0

88
45
80

0
0
0

5
5
5

.000
.Q000
.000

48
45
24

me

I'

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