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August 27, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-08-27

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Tuesday, August 27, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IpI

Hays prepared

to cope with hectic

job

By. URBAN LEHNEt
Editorial Director
Hypothetical situation: literary
college Dean William Hays is con-
erring with a talented young as-
sistant professor who has only
recently received his appointment.
In the course of their discussion,
the rookie scholar tells Hays
bluntly that he is interested in
attaining the literary college
deanship within 20 years, and,
A asks him how to go about getting
there.
What would Hays do?
"I'd have him locked up some-
where," laughs Hays, who took:
over the dean's post July 1, upon
the retirement of William Haber.
"He'd have to be some kind of
%masochist."
University administrators tradi-
tionally have gone about their
daily chores in a spirit of semi-
facetious martyrdom. But in the
case of William Hays, at least,
there are strong reasons for won-
dering why anyone would want
A his job.
As dean, Hays will have to di-
vide . the college's $19 million
budget among 30 departments
and 6 area programs in a man-
ner that will neither overly dam-
age or offend any of them, and
still avoid running a deficit. Each
4 year, he will have to lobby with
the President and vice presidents
for the funds to meet the col-

lege's growing needs. He will havew
to reconcile increasingly clamor-
ous student demands for a voice1
in the decision-making processes
of the college with the faculty's
often closely guarded sense of
prerogatives.
Mostly Hays, working hand in
hand with the college's executive
committee of 6 elected faculty
mnembers, will have to continue
the increasingly difficult job of
recruiting top flight professors'
and keeping those already here
happy.
"Historically, the function of
the dean has been to serve as the t
voice of the faculty," notes Hays.
Even that is not an easy job. Ask-
ed what the faculty thinks about
a problem, he often answers, "I
cannot speak for the faculty.
There are as many faculty opin-
ions as there are faculty members.
I can only represent them as I
understand their feelings."
Even so, few men have assumed
the literary college deanship with,
Hays' ability to cope with its
problems. With a meteoric rise
through the ranks of the psy-
chology department and the liter-
ary college behind him (he was
appointed assistant professor only
11 years .ago), the 42-year-old
Texan is genial, tactful, and po-
litically adroit..
Hays defines his role as "talk-
ing to people," and it is at talking
to people-both publicly and pri-

vately- that he is best. He is
frank, articulate, and agreeable-
too agreeable for some people.
"When we had the Students for
a Democratic Society convention
here last summer and he was as-
sociate dean, I went in to talk to
him about getting University
sponsorship," recalls one campus
radical. "He' said he thought it
was a great idea, but nothing ever
happened."
Indeed, Hays has apparently
heard the complaint himself.
"Just because I think something is
f a good idea," he warns, "doesn't
necessarily mean it's a feasible
one."
A student who has observed
meetings chaired by Hays re-
marks: "He was really smooth.
Everybody always knew who, was
in charge."
The new dean thinks it inevit-
able that students will gain an in-
creasing voice in literary college
decisions-probaly at the depart-
ment level- and welcomes the
trend toward more and better "in-
puts into the decision-making pro-
cess.
"What higher education is
shortest of is good ideas," Hays
insists, "and I don't care where
they come from.
"If you want to look at the
university ? as an industry, we're
the only industry that has ab-
solutely no product feedback."

New LSA Dean William Hays
sm

PLAYBILL

'68-'6

Former LSA Dean Haber
recalls his administration

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By JILL CRABTREE is both' presumptuous and arro-
William Haber, who retired on gant.h
July 1 as dean of tlge literary col- site ofth ,rbul'tios as-
lege, likes to compare his five- sociated with Haber's post he
year administration to the Battle has enjoyed being dean.
of Paris in World War I. "'There 'is a certain tradition
about an administrative post:
"When the French general Jof- one is supposed to suffer in it.
fre was asked who was responsible It is supposed to be denigrating
for winning that skirmish," Haber to leave the intellectual atmo-
says, "he replied that he did not sphere of teaching, reflecting, and
know. But he added he was cer- writing to become involved in
tain that if it had been lost, the budget-making and personnel.
blame would have been placed bde-aigadpronl
squarely on his shoulders." I "This is a lot of baloney, if I
Some of the conflicts which may put it that way. Nothing. can
emerged at the University during give a person greater 'satisfaction.
the past five years at times did than facilitating the functions of
*seem to have all the earmarks of others.",'
open battle. ' And Haber has en- The operations of the, literary
gineered a few victories, college have seen significant pro-
However, Haber's style of ad- gress under Taber's guidance. The
ministration has not been one of curriculum has become less rigid
direct confrontation with the dis- with more flexibility introduced
contented, but rather of judicious into distribution requirements.
accommodation. "The times re- The college is experimenting with
quire adjustment to the world of pass-fail options, and has en-
Ochange," he says. ' larged the honors program., A
For example, a threatened fac- new undergraduate program In
ulty strike to protest the war in liberal studies has been put into
Vietnam was turned into the first operation, and the Residential
"teach-in" three years ago after College, after some false starts, is
Haber agreed to provide necessary finally off the ground.
assembly halls, classrooms and Haber is ,not unaware of sig-
amplifying equipment. nificant problems which still
k , Haber feels such accommoda- challenge LSA, however.
tion Is necessary to keep opera-
tions "on an even keel." "In a rses the bith o
period like this," he says, "mere- Courses as the "outreach" pro-
ly to survive Is almost an accom- gram in psychology and the inner
tsrven. sna -city course, which enable students
pient . reriodto o Ha apply their classroom knowl-
be'durinsteapeio'do Hra- edge in work with the mentally
' tions were staged concerning Uni- disturbed and culturally deprived.
versity defense-research, policies Student support for these
toward industrial and military re- courses, he says, indicate a'
cruiters, use of academic disci- "strong desire for education rele-
pline for non-academic offenses, vant to one's surroundings."
and evolving problems of black He also notes that national em-.
students. phasis on mathematics and the
"It was .a period of intense ac- sciences has contributed to strong
# tivism, among both students and University departments in these
faculty," Haber says. "Students fields.
especially were questioning, and But he feels that international
rightfully, even the most sacred scientific competition and a desire
ideas." for immediate relevance in educa-
But Haber strongly opposes tion have caused a "dangerous
demonstrations which disrupt the neglect" in the humanities. He
operations of the University. "I maintains that departments in
b have only one quarrel with the philosophy and )anguages and lit-
activists," Haber says. erature have often been given
"Their idealism is wonderful, lower priority than they merit.
and their interest in social, polit- "Students want relevance," he
ical and international problems says. "But on the other hand, it
is encouraging. Their authori- would be a sad thing if all of lib-
tarianism, however, is disturbing. eral education were based only
They tend to impose their views on today's relevance. Why then,
on others rather' than attemp- would we study Plato? We need
ting to convert them. Such im- to discover the relation of the past
position would be permissible to the present, and the present
through the democratic process, to the future.
but to do so through disruption "We live in a period of multiple

revolution - in science, technol-
ogy, in education and living
standards and even in morals.
The best education, for adjust-
ment to this revolution is some
understanding of historical and
philosophical values, not only to
prepare one to make a living but
to enjoyslife."
Haber would like to see every
student, receive a four-year-ed-
ucation in liberal studies "and
not worry about making a living
until the fifth and sixth year."
In his new post as an adviser
to, the University president and
executive officers, Haber will in-
deed be' involved in nbudget-
making and personnel." One of
his primary jobs will be to work
with newly appointed Vice Presi-
dent for State Relations and
Planning," Arthur M. Ross. Haber
will help Ross familiarize him-
self with the state's economy andj
its relation to University finances.
In addition, he will assist In
long-term; academic planning.

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