100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 19, 1968 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Saturday, October 19, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Se

S O c t o b e r 1 9,..

given

Black

expelled;
MEXICO CITY (il,-Spindly Bob Beamon soared an unbe-
lievable 29 feet, 21/2 inches in the long jump and Lee Evans
led an American sweep in the 400-meter dash yesterday at
the troubled Olympic Games.
Before the two blacks smashed world records, the Olym-
pic Village was shaken by the news that sprinters Tommie
Smith and John Carlos had been thrown off the team for their
racially symbolic actions at a; medal-ceremony Wednesday.
The U.S. Olympic Committee said it had taken the drastic
action against" the two athletes after a threat by he Inter-
national Olympic Committee, to expel the entire U.S. team
unless some steps were taken.
A threatened walkout by American athletes because of
the suspension of the Negro sprinters failed to materialize
as Evans, a, close friend of the
ousted payir, ran and won the
dash.
Evanspaced a 1-2-3 finish of
U.S. Negro sprint stars in the '400
meters. ,At the following medal
ceremony Evans, Larry James and
Ron. Freeman wore black berets7
as they mounted the winners'
stand and gave clenched fist sa- NIGHT EDITOR:
lutes .similar to those made by JOEL BLOCK
Smith and Carlos at the earlier
victory ceremony. -
However, the three athletes took
off the berets, held 8their hands at Olympic victory ceremony. Wed-
their sides and faced the American nesday.
flag when the Star Spangled Ban- Smith, winner of the gold medal
ner was played during the medals in the 200-nieter race, and Carlos,
presentation. who finished third in the same
Asked at a;press interview why event, raised clenched fists in
the trio had porn black beretsblack gldves and bowed their
' r 'heads while the Star Spangled
Evans replied: It. was raining. Banner was playedeachwore
Asked if. he planned some, form of anewsplydEch or
acti In sypathy with Smith one black glove, black scarves and
and Carlos, his former teammates blacksocks.
at San Jose State College, Evans Although the first reaction of
answered: "No comment." many Negiro athletes was to go.
BCKS RESENTFUL home, a U.S. Olympic official said
The U.S. Olympic Committee he was sure everything would be
The .S.Olymic ommiteesmoothed out.
announced A the, suspension ofsmohdut
Smitand Carlos aftermidnight "There was a lot of emotion at
Thursday for what it termed "un- first arid' some resentment," said
typical exhibitionism" during an Ilirlmer Lodge, chairman of both
the 1' AI OlvJiI. s. df thi A ua t-

Peamon

flies

'1-Hoosier clash:

Good cage classic

JOHN CARLOS

-Associated Press
ROBERT BEAMON of El Paso, Texas, burrows his feet into the
sand pit after 'a record-shattering long jump 'of 8.9 meters
(29'2 "). It was his first attempt in the Olympic long jump event
yesterday.

i
t

TOM-PnE SMITH

The suspensions removed both
from the squad and banned them
from the Olympic Village and use
of the American team's facilities.
Both men stayed in the city
Thursday night but Carlos re-
turned to the Village briefly yes-
terday morning to pick up tickets.
Afterabsorbing the first shock
of the news which spread around
the Village in early morning,
Evans and Ralph Boston, world
record holder ,in the long jump,
said they would compete in their
events. Boston took the bronze
medal in the long jump.
The performance of Beamon,
the Texas-El Paso stringbean, and
Evans made up for disappointing
showings by three U.S. girls in the
women's 200, won in a world rec-
ord time of 22.5 seconds by Po-
land's Irina Kirszenstein.
RvYUN WINS
Earlier, Jim Ryun, the Kansas
comet, successfully kicked off a
bid to become the first American
in 60 years to win the Olympic
metric mile, and the American
basketball team captured its 71st
consecutive Olympic victory by
beating Panama 95-60.
Californian Bill Toomey also
jumped into the lead in the pun-

apoplex --
doug helter

Gn .o. uymnpic ana Te ima eur
Athletic Union's track and field
committee, "but it is cooling
down."
Jesse Owens, winner of four gold"
medals In Berlin in 1936 and a
member of the Olympic consul-
tants' committee, met with Car-
los, Smith and several other ath-
letes late Thursday night. Owens
was closeted with U.S. Olympic
officials yesterday afternoon.
RUNNERS BANNED
Smith, and Carlos were alter-
nates pn the 400-meter relay team
that is due to compete today and
tomorrow. r,

ishing decathlon competition after
two events. .r.,
Beamon's amazing jump exceed-,
ed by almost two feet the world
record of 27-4% shared by Ameri-
can Ralph Boston and Igor Tor-
Ovanesyan of Russia. -The leap
nearly carried him out of the pit
and the crowd of 50,000 in the
Olympic Stadium went hysterical
in near disbelief. So did Beamon,
the 6-foot-3, 160-pound New York
native.
He ran around excitedly, waving'
his hands, and then fell to his
knees, overcome by emotion. The
other athletes mobbed the 22-
year-old Beamon and he wept in
joy. Boston, the 1960 gold medal-
ist; put his arms around the
youngster to steady him.
EVANS REBOUNDS
Evans, rocked earlier in the day
by the news of the suspensions of
his teammates, Smith and Carlos
rebounded with a sensational 43.8,
Jleading the -first American medal
sweep of the Games. James of Vil-
lanova was second and Freeman of
ArizonaState finished third.
Evans' time smashed the listed
world record of 44.5 held by Smith
and also wiped out a 44.0 pending
mark set by Evans in the U.S.
team trials.
James almost caught Evans at
the tape and Freeman was about
two strides back. The race was so
close, at the finish that it took
more than one half hour for the
official result to be released,'
Wyomia Tyus of Griffin, Ga.,,
the winn'er of the 100-meter dash,
led going into the home stretch
but faded badly when the- Polish
champion put on a tremendous
burst of speed.

By BOB LEES
Associate Sports Editor..
Every sports fan worthy of his
statistics knows one thing about
the state of Indiana - they sure
can play basketball down there.
And every statistical-minded'
football fan has confidence in this
prediction on today's Michigan-
Indianargame:the score will pro-
bably resemble one of. those
Hoosier court battles.
Both the Wolverines and t h e
Hoosiers have sustained only one
non-conference loss to go with'
three high-scoring wins. Michigan
has averaged 24.5 points per game
(30 after the California. loss),
while Indiana has rolled for 31.5
per game (35 in the three wins).
The Wolverines' totals may
seem a little lower than the Hoos-
iers', but one more little' statistic
can be thrown in here: Indiana's
defense has allowed 30.5 points per
game.
The name of this game, then,
will be offense, sort of like when
the Tigers play the Twins with
the wind blowing out to center-
field. And bdth teams have a one-
two punch that has been the main
reason their opponents' defenses
have gone batty: Michigan, of
course, has Ron Johnson and Den-
nis Brown, while Indiana lists
flarry Gonso and John Isenbarger.
If Isenbarger were playing base-
ball, he'd be called "flakey".
There's no way to really describe
that term except to recall some of
the tailback's past actions, 1 i k e
passing from punt formation,
which end up driving coach John
Pont to distraction - apd oppon-
ents to defeat .
What makes him so hard to de-
fend against is his wide range of
abilities. Last year's, 27-20 victory,
over the Wolverines was engineer-
ed mainly because he ran the half-
back-option pass so well. This
year he's already gained 397 yards
on the ground, completed four of,
five passes, caught two for 59
yards, averaged 42.4 yards in punt-
ing, run back a -kickoff for 31
yards - and probably swept out
the gym for exercise.,,'-,
But Gonso doesn't' have to be
content just handing off to Isen-
barger and watching him do' his
stuff. The junior quarterback him-
self ranks tenth in the nation in
total offense, rushing as often (64
attempts) as Isenbarger, while
completing 37 of 73 passes and
scoring four touchdowns.
So far, then, the Hoosier offense
years a somewhat startling re-
semblance to the Wolverines'
(though Johnson's one pass at-
tempt last week fell far short of
Isenbarger's style: it was inter-
cepted). The other members of
this cast add even more of a simi-
larity.
To parallel Garvie Craw, t he
Hoosiers present Bob Pernell, who

Off ense

MICHIGAN
Mandich (215)
Penksa (225)
Caldarazzo (210)
Denzin (220),
Broadnax (226)'
Dierdorf (225)
Imsland (210)
Brown (175)
Betts (180)
Craw (211)
Johnson (196)
MICHIGAN
Seymour (193)
Goss (225)
Hill (210.
Parks (235)
Pryor (218)
Stincic (217)
Moore (200)
Healy (170)
Curtis (184)
Hoey (169)'
Hartman (170)

TE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
FL
FB
TB

Defense

INDIANA
GageI
Andrews
WoodI
Applegate
DeSalle
Spickard
Stolbergi
Gonsoi
Butcheri
Fleming
Isenbargeri
INDIANA
Bilunasi
Whitei
AdamsI
Wolfe
price
Sniadecki
Silas
Moynihan
Norman
Cunningham
Baughman

(19
(20
(21
(19
(22
(22
(17
(19
(19
(21
(19
(21
(22
(19
(21
(22
(21
(21
(19
(18
(17
(18

.s averaging 6.7 yards per carry,
more than Isenbarger in 10 fewer
attempts. The Wolverine flanker
combination of Paul Staroba -
John Gabler is1represented by
Jade Butcher (19 receptions for
399 yards and 6 TD's), while Eric
Stolberg, with 11 catches for 177
yards,matches up at split end
with Michigan's Jerry Imsland-
The Jim Mandich tight-end slot
is filled by -Al Gage (nine for 108
yards), a senior who 'has never
lived up to the potential he show-
d as a sophomore.
When it comes to defense, how-
ever, the parallel breaks down.'
Michigan's totals of 13.5 points-.
allowed per game (11 after Cali-
fornia) is much better, than In-
dianp's, even though total yardage
figures are not nearly as dispar-
ate. Yet Michigan's "20-20" de-

fense has been stopping opponents
when' it counts, while Indiana's
main bulwarkr linebacker Jim
Sniadecki, is out of today's posted
lineup.
What these starters will face to-
day should be little different than
last year, as far as the Hoosier of-
fense g'oes. Options, from t h e
quarterback or the wingback posi-
tion, on pitches or passes, into the
line or on sweeps, should provide
the bulk of the play.
Michigan, on the other hand,
found an effective method of vary-
ing running and passing last week,
and showed a strong ability to
score from far out.
Put the two on the same field,
then, and the result should be
what the basketball people would
call a "barn-burner".

The Lineups

LE
4, LT
MG
, RT
E
Lit
LB
S
.S
Cl8
CB

)6)
'3)
2)
98)
Z2 )
24)
77)
90)
3)
12)
97)
18)
10)
5)
18)
28)
14)
15)
98)
85)
78)
s1)

Gee whiz,

Arthur's coming

Throughout. the Midwest, there seems to be almost a patho-'
logical lack of interest in tennis as a sport.
People think it's played exclusively by rich snobs named
"Chauncey" on the East Coast, for by sun tanned tennis bums who
surf in their spare time in Ythe West.,
\ Only in Hamtramck do they know the truth, where nestled among
the Pollock jokes, scmebogly has'invented a "Peaches BArtkowicz."
Well, .all this has got to change. Tennis, after all, has been
scientifically proven to be the sport that best combines each aspect of
pt every other sport in one competitive endeavor.
Got that?
Anyway, the guy 'who made the decision that a major tennis
exhibition should be held on the Univ'ersity of Michigan campus
we all know and love at Ann Arbor must have rocks in his head.
In addition to all the other problems tennis has in this part
of the country, students already interested in tennis wlen they first
come to Michigan have certainly lost it all after they have had a taste
of exorbitant court fees or weeds on the baseline.
But with the odds running 20-1 against anything coming of it,
somebody has had the nerve to bring Arthur Ashe to the University
Events Building to raise money for the Davis Cup fund.
It is true that Ashe is at least the third best tennis player
in the world and /the top amateur. The young serviceman
thrilled millions on television, as he won the 1968 U.S. Open
Championships in early September.
But you can bet most of the people watching their tubes were
not in the Midwest.
Ashe and teammate Clark Graebner are the'big favorites to end
the Australian domination of the Davis Cup, symbQl of world tennis
supremacy, late this year.
Graebner is coming to the Events Building to'o.
He will face Ashe in a two-of-three sets match.
Incidentally, Ashe and Graebner do more to cldbber the
stereotypes of what tennis players' are than anyone else you can
f think of.
Ashe is black. As a youngster in Richmond, Virginia, he was
thrown off the local tennis courts.
Graebner is a former star at Northwestern University in Illinois.
He actually played on a team that won the Big Ten- championship
in one of his three varsity years. Ths is a rarity, of course, since every-
one knows Michigan takes that 'crown 90 per cent of the time.
The captain of the Davis Cup team is Donald DeI. His
brother Dick is currently captain of the Michigan tennis team,
which plays almost its entire season in the spring term after most
of the students go home for the year.
The two Dells will square off in a doubles match against Ashe
and Graebner.
nGAlso on the program is a match between Wolverine varsity
players Brian Marcus and Jon Hainline. Hainline has more or less a
classical style but Marcus is a masher with short legs and a big trunk.
When is this match, anyway? Despite rumors to the contrary,
it's Sunday, Sunday, Sunday, Sunday at 1:30 p.m.
Tickets are a buck for students.
This could be the last chance people in this area will ever get to
see tennis of this caliber.

COME IN FOR DINNER ON SUNDAY
ENTERTAINMENT Monday-Saturday
FINE
FOOD
ENTERTAIN-
MENT 314 S. Fourth Ave.
3 P..-1 A 761-3548

V.

-Associated Press
LEE EVANS, winner of the 400-meter run in yesterday's Olympic
games, and his teammates Larry James and Ron Freeman (right),
quietly accept their medals without semblance of the black power
protest which occurred Wednesday.

ItM
a-r
a

not often
engineer
gets to
design
cornpany.

/

PACKARD Ca r Wash
3070 Packrd-I block E. of Plat
Announces Its
GRAND W OPNN
FRI., $AT., SUN.-OCT. 18, 19, 20
c Yes, we widl actually GIVE AWAY 25c
coin to EVERY car duing the hours of
10 A.M. to 9 P.M. during our grand
FRE opening just to get acquainted.
FEATURING 2 CONVENIENT METHODS

,; : ,

"MIND EXPANDING DRUGS AND RELIGION"
Prof. Edmund Anderson, Ph.D.
Research Pharmacologist
University of Illinois
7 p.m. Sunday, October 20
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH.
(E. Huron Of Fletcher)
10:30a.m.
The Pleasure Principle"

DO-IT-YO;URSELF

-Let High Pressure
Spray Dolthe Work
-Wash, Rinse & Wax
--4 Large Boys
-No Waiting in
Long Lines
l'-"Iv

AUTOMATIC
-Only One in
Ann Arbor
-Never Get Out of
Your Car
-East, Only 2 M.in
-Nothing Touches
Car Except Spray

When he does, he tends to take care
of his own kind.
He designs a company that is
one heck of a good place for an
engineer to work.
You can tell LTV Aerospace Corporation
is an engineering oriented company.
The ratio of engineers to
everybody else is exceptionally high,

The engineer who wants to be a
technical specialist here can do as well
as the engineer who gets into
administration.
The engineer who wants to keep
working on an advanced degree can
do it right here.
And the projects: they range from deep
space to the ocean floor - military
and commercial aircraft, V/STOL;
Ianch vehicles: extra vehicular

No question about it: the engineers
at LTV Aerospace are taking care of
themselves.
An LTV Aerospace representative will
tell you how to get inon it.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23

Schedule an apoointment or write:

iI

.I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan