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October 19, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-19

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Saturday, October 19, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Satur~day, October 19, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Wallace's

'PLENTY OF GUESSES'
folks:' Where do they come from

THE CANDIDATE

WASHINGTON (P) - Politi-
cal pros and amateurs alike of-
fer plenty of guesses but little
in places like Grove City, Ohio,
and Watervliet; iMch., are us-
ually political amateurs given to
extravagent optimism.
Ask most state-level Democra-
tic and Republican politicos
where the Wallace vote will
come from and each tend to
point to the other party.
Wallace campaign organizers
solid evidence of how much
strength third party presidential
candidate George C. Wallace has
in the North.
And they're equally uncertain
whether the Wallace vote Nov.
5 will come from normally,
Democratic or Republican vot-
ers.
William I. Flanagan, head of
vice president Hubert H. Hum-,
phrey's campaign in Illinois, of-
fers this appraisal of the ques-
tion: Who will Wallace hurt?
"It depends on whom you talk
to last," says Flanagan.

THE CANDIDATE'S GRASS ROOTS

Daily-Jay L. Cassidy
WALLACE SUPPORTERS are kept well apart from their candidate when he stumps for votes; the
purpose is protection from enthusiastic as well as disgruntled crowds.

The size of the Wallace vote
-and its source-could be de-
cisive in some of the industrial
states with their big chunks of
electoral votes.
Some of; the most optimistic
Walace claims come from Mich-
igan. The Michigan chairman
of Walace's American Ind-
pendent aPrty is Harold Snyder,
56. A lumber dealer from Water-
vliet, in the southeast corner of
the state, Snyder backed Repub-
lican Barry Goldwater for presi-
dent in 1964.

"VISCONTI HAS MADE A BEAUTIFUL, DISCREET,
PERCEPTIVE FILM OF THIS EPOCHAL WORK OF THE
20TH-CENTURY WORLD ... FILM ACTING AT ITS
PUREST ... THIS IS THE EXPRESSION, THROUGH
THEIR ART, BY SOME FINE FILM ARTISTS OF THEIR
SYMPATHY AND LOVE FOR CAMUS' GREAT BOOK."
-Stanley Kauffman, TheNew Republic
"MASTROIANNI'S PERFORMANCE IS IMPECCABLE.
ANNA KARINA IS MOVING AS HIS MISTRESS. IT
IS AN IMPRESSIVE FILM AND A RARITY."
-Hollis Alpert, The Saturday Review
"ONE OF THE BEST"-Esqruire
"AN EXCELLENT FILM!"-Life

Mrs. Maxine Wells, a Battle
Creek medical assistant and
state independent party secre-
tary( says the campaign in "go-
ing beautifully, with some of our
polls running 70 to 80 per cent
in the plants and small business-
es and in some neighborhood
blocks we have sampled. Some
have been as high as 99 per
cent."
Larry Lee, 26, another former
Goldwater supporter who now is
vice chairman of the indepen-
dent party, said 24 "amateur,
fRI.-SAT.-SUN., 8.:00 P.M
Tickets $1.00
FOYER OF ANGELL HALL
The Lord Chamberlain's
Players,
DONALD HALL starring
IN
Man red
by LORD BYRON

pallsters" questioned 3,314
people and reported these re-
suits: Wallace 74 per cent, Nix-
on 15, Humphrey 5, undecided 6.
In Wayne County, the state's
most populous, money from
small contributions is used for
such things as five-day, $320
run of four-a-day commercials
on a Detroit radio station and
quarter-page advertisements in
seven weekly newspapers and
one suburban daily.
Mrs. Elly Peterson, state Re-
publicantichairman, and he r
Democratic counterpart, State
Sen. Sander Levin, agree Wal-
lace will get something over 10
per cent of the vote. Levin's not
sure who'll be hurt; Mrs. Peter-
son says "I don't think he's go-
ing to hurt the Republicans
nearly as much as the D e mo-
crats."
Ohio, where the U. S. Supreme
Court put Walace on the ballot
this week, is an example of a
state full of loosely organized
Wallace activists - and appre-
hensive Republican and Demo-
cratic leaders.
State chairman of the Wal-
lace for President Committee is
Richard C. "Bud" Kochenspar-
ger of Grove City, a Columbus
suburb. He's 36, a former Demo-
crat, an avowed political con-
servative, and, a sheet m e t a l
worker.
Last week, however, Wallace's
national headquarters sent G.
Sage Lyons, a young Mobile,
Ala., attorney to Columbus to
coordinate Ohio activities. The
Wallace group found other sup-
porters were working outside
Kochensparger's organization.

Lyons' job: Pull all the workers
together.
He opened an expanded state
headquarters in a Columbus of-
fice building and brought in half
a dozen paid workers-first of
the Ohio Wallace campaign. The
Wallace camp is shooting for
25,000 volunteer workers-about
two per Ohio precinct. It claims
to have 15,000 so far.
Kochensparger says the Wal-
lace support is concentrated in
the blue collar and small busi-
ness communities. He claims "at
leat 99 per cent" of the votes
of police officers and their fam-
ilies.h
Campaign expenses such as
rent and printing are paid by
contributions mostly in the $1
to $5 range - "more than am-
ple" to meet costs. National
Ala., chips in for advertising.
headquarters in Montgomery,
Democratic leaders in t h e
Cleveland area agree privately
that most Wallace support there
will come from Democrats-the
type of Democrats, they say,
who elected conservative Demo-
crat Frank Lausche as gover-
nor or senator time after time
until he was knocked off in a
primary this year.
J. Warren Keel of Philadel-
phia, 69, who describes himself
as an elderly but spry former
Republican ward committeeman,
makes speeches on behalf of
Wallace in eastern and central
Pennsylvania and southern New
Jersey.
"We don't have great big of-
fices," says Keel. "We don't
have that kind of money. We
are operating at the precinct
elevel, where we have people
sympathetic to the Wallace-
program."
A. J. Watson of Harrisburg,
state chairman of the conserva-

tive Constitutional Party, says
"I think Wallace has got a good
chance of carrying Pennsylvania.
"Three or four weeks ago I
would have said 'no.' but I
honestly believe he just may
carry it. We are getting reports
aging, especially from labor con-
from all over that are encour-
centration areas like Pittsburgh.
Altoona, Erie and Scranton. I
had no idea we would be pick-
ing up this kind of labor vote."
A Republican-sponsored poll
in August indicated Wallace
could get 10 to 20 per cent of the
Pennsylvania vote, more at the
expense of Hubert H. Hum-
prhey than Richard M. Nixon.
In Illinois, the top Wallace
man is Arthur Kelly, 44, a mus-
cular, former Chicago homicide
detective who now owns a bar
and two drive-ins. The liaison
man from national Wallace
headquarters is Alabama State
Sen. W. G. McCarley.
"We have no formal organi-
zation," says McCarley. "We're
just doing the best 'we can with
the funds and time we have."
Adds Kelley: "Working guys
keep us going."
They look for a million or
more votes out of the estimated
4 million Illinois will cast Nov.
In Massachusetts, a poll com-
missioned by the Boston Globe
and published last week gives
Wallace 8 per cent of the state-
wide vote.
Out in California, about 90
local Wallace committees are
operating - each essentially on
its own. State campaign chair-
man James T. Slaughter of Sac-
ramento, a former Democrat,
says that according to his fig-
ures, Wallace will poll 58 per
cent in California.
Billy Mills, a Negro who is a
Los Angeles city councilman and
Democratic chairman of Los
Angeles County, says: "I be-
lieve the political stock of
George Wallace is being consid-
erably underestimated. A lot of
people, including political pros,
are going to be amazed at the
votes he pulls. And, I think Cali-
fornia will be one of his happy
hunting grounds. r
"I even think he will pull
some liberal votes. The liberals
may vote for him to teach the
status quo forces a lesson and
the right wingers will vote for
him to teach the student pro-
testors and the black rioters a
lesson.
"One Negro told me he was
going to vote Wallace because
the American people should see
themselves in the mirror and
that might call for a reap-
praisal."

the
news toda
bn The Associated Press and College Press Service'
A FLURRY OF PEACE RUMORS flew about Paris and
Saigon yesterday amidst increased speculation that a
bombing halt in U.S. air strikes against North Vietnam
may be imminent.
Agence France-Press, the French News Agency, quoted a
North Vietnamese personality as saying the Hanoi govern-
ment has replied unfavorably to an American proposal in-
volving a joint withdrawal of troops from the demilitarized,
zone and a bombing halt.
Other sources, hoyever, said the remarks of the North
Vietnamese personality were the standard public response
Hanoi has always given to such suggestions.
In Washington a State Department spokesman said he
knew of no facts that a message has been received from North
Vietnam in response to the reported U.S. proposal.
South Vietnamese President Nguyen Vqn Thieu mean-
while hinted he would soon be ready to reveal a new package
peace proposal from the U.S. to Hanoi. In the past two days,
Thieu has held meetings with U.S. Ambassador Ellsworth
Bunker.
High government spokesmen in Saigon said Thieu would
discuss the subject "if he is asked about it" during a trip he
is taking this morning.
Some Saigon officials, however, have expressed fear of a
bombing halt in return for Hanoi's pledge to curtail its war
effort in the South.
Premier Tran Van Huong issued a statement yesterday
that indicated Saigon's present concern. He said Vietnam
could approve of no bombing halt that would not be favorable
to the Saigon government.
AS THE GROUND WAR IN VIElTNAM slackened off
again yesterday, U.S. intelligence analysts reported they
believe the equivalent of five North Vietnamese Army di-
visions have pulled out of the South since last September.
Army officials believe the divisions have gone north to
refit, resupply, reorganize, and reinforce. North Vietnamese
troops have followed this pattern often in the past.
Military sources admitted, however, that the pull back
might be connected with negotiations on a possible total
bombing halt.
Despite the estimate that between 40,000 and 60,000 Com-
munist soldiers have moved out of South Vietnam, U.S. planes
kept up their attacks on the panhandle area. Military spokes-
men said bombing is being concentrated now on waterways
because there is less ground traffic from the North.
CZECH PREMIER OLDRICH CERNIK told his coun-
try's National.Assembly yesterday all occupation troops
will leave Czechosloyakia in about two months, except
for 70,000 Russian soldiers, who will remain indefinitely.
After the Assembly approved the Moscow-dictated treaty
legalizing the occupation, crowds outside Prague City Hall
cried "shame" at assemblymen as they left the building.
Cernik told the assembly that the Soviet Union is paying
for the upkeep of its men and any soldiers committing legal
offenses will be prosecuted by the Czech government.
The assembly vote was 228-4, with 10 abstentions.
Hours later, Moscow radio announced the Presidium of
the Supreme Soviet had ratified the treaty by a unanimous
vote. Cernik and Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin signed, the
treaty on Wednesday.
Other agreements listed in the treaty were that the/size
of the Czechoslovak army would be reduced in exchange for
technical equipment, and that Moscow would pay for financial
losses incurred in occupation damages.
SOME OF THE NATION'S LEADING industrialists
were told yesterday that the new presidential adminis-
tration would have to take strong measures next year to
ward off a major economic recession in 1970 or 1971.
A report from economists to the meeting of the Business
Council in Hot Springs, Ark., added that extension of the 10
percent surtax and continued curtailment of government
spending would be necessary,
The report, delivered by R a l p h Lazarus, a Cincinnati
businessman, was written by the council's 20 professional
economists.

It predicted a modest slowdown of the business boom late
this year and in the first half of 1969, but said this would not
be enough to offset inflationary forces.
THE THREE APOLLO 7 astroniruts triggered an un-
precedented space maneuver yesterday as their capsule
engine fired up for 66 seconds to boost them through a
simulated kick that will send future astronauts around
the moon.
Capt. Walter M. Schirra Jr. and his two copilots then roll-
ed their ship for several hours, testing a power-saving method
of using the sun's heat to keep spacecraft components warm.
Earlier, a power failure in West Virginia briefly knocked
out worldwide tracking circuits that relay information to the
Space Center.
QUOTE OF THE DAY: Republican vice presidential
candidate Spiro T. Agnew, explaining why he has not
made tours of big-city ghettoes said yesterday:
"If you've seen one city slum, you've seen them all."

-- --
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CINEMA II

"MY NAME IS IVAIN

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Best Picture,

V~enice

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IN

Film Festival
FRI.-SAT., OCT. 18-19, AUD. A
I.D. Recd.

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UNION-LEAGUE

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Presents
1968 Homecoming Queen Finalists

"An Exuberant Comic Fantasy.. .
'Cock-a-doodle' has a lift !"
-Detroit News

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FRAN O'DELL NANCY SEBOLD ELLEN BISHOP CHRIS O'CONNELL
Lambda Chi Alpha Kappa Alpha Theta Jordan Hall Delta Gamma

ANNOUNCING ..
A New Film Society in.Ann Arbor
Every Monday at 7:30 P.M.
at the ARK COFFEE HOUSE
1421 HilStreet
between Forest and Washtenow
We are starting this Monday, Oct. 21
with

&'nqpatlatkon4

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