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October 18, 1968 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-18

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Friday, October 1$, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eleven

Frdy coer1,16 H MCIAaAL

Pace Eleven

:,.

Us. t~
Tanker set,
relay marks
By fhe Associated Press
MEXICO CITY-U.S. swimming
forces splashed to a perfect, rec-
ord-smashing start in the Olym-
pics with two gold :medals yester-
day.
The golds gave the United States
nine for the five-day. old Games.
The U.S. also :has three silvers
and five bronzes for a total of 17.
A quartet of teen-age girls
ignited what is expected to be a
lush harvest of gold medals with
a narrow but double record victory
in the 400-meter medley relay.
Kaye Hall of Tacoma, Wash.,
Catie Ball of Jacksonville, ,Fla.,
Ellie Daniels of Elkins Park, Pa.,
and Sue Pederson of Sacramento,
Calif.,. completed the race in 4:28.3,_
eclipsing the Olympic record and
the listed world mark.
The race was a two-team strug-
gle from the start between the
American and Australian quartets.
Kaye Hall 17-year-old, and Aus-<
tralia's Lynne Watson hooked up
in a duel in the opening back-
stroke leg with the American hold-
ing' a :slight lead.
Catie Ball, another 17-year-old
from Jacksonville, Fla., swim-
ming the breaststroke, had an edge
over Judy Playfair In their duel.
But Ellie Daniels of Elkins Park,
Pa{, at 18 the best of the four-
some, pulled away from Lyn Mac-
Clements for a one-meter advant-
age.
Sue Pederson of Sacramento,
Calif., who celebrated her 15th
birthday Wednesday, swam the
anchor freestyle and she really
turned it on in the final 50 meters
as she sped away from Australia's
Penny Steinback. Then, like any
happy girl, Sue broke down and
cried.
When the waters of the Olympic
pool had subsided, the men's 400-
meter freestyle relay flashed to a

kes

ninth

Olympic

gold

medal

-At.
e ro
RALPH BOSTON soars to a new Olympic record in the long jump
of 27'134" to lead all qualifiers. Boston, a veteran Olympian, was
upset in 1964 and looks to this year's Games as his vindication.

Blacek protest
disturbs IOC
By The Associated Press
MEXICO CITY - Swift Willie
Davenport of Southern Univer-
sity, claimed America's seventh
gold medal with a record-tying
victory in the 100-meter hurdles
yesterday while Olympic officials
struggled in closed meeting rooms
over the racial turn the Games
have taken.
Davenport's time of 13.3 sec-
onds tied the Olympic mark set
by teammate Erv Hall of Villan-
ova in the semifinals. Hall was
second in 13.4, the same time as,
bronze medalist ELddy Ottez of
Italy. Another American, Leon
Coleman of Winston-Salem, N.C.,
was fourth in 13:6.
Davenport jumped off to a
great start and went over the first-
hurdle with a clear lead. By the
seventh hurdle, he was two meters
in front and raised his hands at
the tape just as Smith had done
in the 100-meter race Wednesday.
Both the International Olympic
Committee and the U.S. Olympic
Committee met in extraordinary
sessions to 6onsider the actions of
Negro sprinters Tommie Smith
and John Carlos, whose behavior
following their 1-3 finish in Wed-
nesday's 200-meter dash touched'
off the racial controversy.
The U.S. committee officially
apologized to the I0C and the
Mexican Planning Committee for
the actions of the two athletes in
a carefully worded statement that
emerged from some five hours of o
meetings.
Meanwhile, back at Olympic E
Stadium, all three medalists a
smashed the world record in the t
triple jump with Russia's Victor v

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I

second double record, winning in
3:31.7.
The fqursome of Zac Zern of
Buena Park, Calif., Steve Rerych
of Paterson, N.J., Mark Spitz of
Santa Clara, Calif., and Keny
Walsh of Ponte Vedra, Calif., sur-
daily
sports.
NIGHT EDITOR:
PHIL BROWN
MORE SPORTS, PAGE 9

Gridde, Pickings
The world will not salute you. A DeGualian like character will
not kiss you on both cheeks. He will not pin a medal on your chest.
Your name will be all but forgotten.
Who remembers such immortals as the Great Soaby? Who re-
members what he is not remembered for?
The Great Soaby won the Gridde Pickings (then Grid Selections)'
contest of September 28, 1958 with an 18-2 score.
We of the Daily Sports Staff cannot promise you fame and
fortune if you enter and win Gridde Pickings. But we can promise
this great, soon-to-be-forgotten hero a super fabulous, ultra-great
(and just a bit greasy) pizza from the Cottage Inn if, and only if, he
gets his entry to the Daily by the witching hour Friday night.
Warning:- The Great Soaby will personally curse anyone whose
entries total more than one.
DAVID WEIR, Sports Editor (53-27 .663) - MICHIGAN, Iowa, Michigan State,
Notre Dame, Ohio State, Purdue, Oklahoma, Navy, The Citadel, Tennessee, UCLA,
Cornell, Missouri, Arizona. State, Texas Tech, Florida, Stanford, Mississippi, Muh-
leuburg.
BILL LEVIS,zAssociate Sports Editor (53-27 .663) - MICHIGAN, Iowa, Mich-
igan State, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Purdue, Oklahoma, Navy, The Citadel, Ten-
nessee, California, Harvard, Nebraska, Arizona State, Texas Tech, Florida, Stan-;
ford, Mississippi, Muhlenburg.
DOUG HELLER. Associate Sports Editor (49-31, .613) - MICHIGAN, Iowa,
Michigan State, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Purdue, Oklahoma, Navy, The Citadel,
Tennessee, California, Harvard, Nebraska, Arizona State, Texas Tech, Florida,
Stanford, Mississippi, Muhlenburg .
BOB LEES, Associate Sports Editor (48-32, .600) -- MICHIGAN, Iowa, Minne-
sota, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Purdue, Oklahoma, Pittsburgh, The Citadel,
Tennessee, California, Harvard, Nebraska, Oregon State, Mississippi State, Florida,
Washington State, Mississippi, Ursinus.
MARTY BASCH AND RON HARVEY Guest Selectors (Indiana Law Students)
4 - Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Purdue, Oklahoma, Pitts-
burgh, The Citadel, Alabama, UCLA, Cornell, Nebraska,. Oregon State, Texas
Tech,. Florida, Stanford, Mississippi, Muhlenburg.

passed the world mark of 3:32.5
and the Olympic standard of
3:33.2
Zern, Reruch and Walsh were
members of the team that held
the world recird before Thursday's
performance. Don Scholander, who
won four gold medals in the 1964
Olympics was the other member of
that team.
In swimming to new marks,
Zorn matched Schollander's Olym-
pic standard for 100 meters as he
swam the opening leg in 53.4.
Russia, four meters back at thet
finish was clocked in 3.34.2 with
Australia traveling in 3:34.7 for
the bronze medal.
In basketball action, Jo Jo
White led a vicious U.S. attack
that kept the lead except for the
opening moments of the game
Wednesday night as the Americans
sailed by their first big test in the
Olympic tournament, beating
Yugoslavia, 73-58.
The U.S. led at the half 36-28
and easily increased its margin in
the early stages of the second half,
rolling to its fourth straight vic-
tory as White, wizard of the mid-
court shot, looped in 24 points. z
The victory was ~ the 70th
straight in Olympic play for the
U.S., which has never lost in the
Games in basketball.
The los was the first for Yugo-
slavia after three triumphs.
White pumped in 12 of his points
in the first 20 minutes with some
deadly outside shooting that
shocked the tall Yugoslavians.
.Davis Cup pers
to 1lay tennis
exhibition here'
Tw~o members of the undefeated
United States Davis Cup tennis
team will perform in an exhibition
at the University Events Building
tomorrow at 1:30 p.m.
Arthur Ashe, 1968 U.S. Amateur
and US. Open champion, will play
Clark Graebner in the feature
match of the extravaganza
Also performing in the exhibi-
tion will be Donald Dell, captain
of the Davis Cup squad, Dick Dell,
Donald's brother and a member of
the Michigan varsity net team,
and Wolverines Brian Marcus and
John Hainline.
Tickets are available to the gen-
eral public at two dollars, and to
students, staff, and faculty at one
dollar. All proceeds go to the
Davis scp fund.

Bilboard
The Michigan Women's Field
Hockey team will play Michigan
State today at 4:15 on Palmer
Field.
UTTLE VICTIES

2
2
h
a
C
e

Saneyev taking the gold on a leap
of 57 feet,% 4inches.
Hungary's Guylia Zeivotzkyand
Romauld Klim of Russia staged
stirring battle in the hammer
hrow before the Hungarian won
with an Olympic record heave of
40 feet, 8 inches.
Klim took the silver medal at
40-5.
The throw did notmatch Zei-
votsky's best effort, though. The
Hungarian has a world record
heave of 242 feet pending.
Two Americans, Ralph Boston
and Barbara Ferrell, smashed
Olympic records in qualifying
vents. Boston broke his own mark

in the long jump with a leap of
27 feet, 1%/ inches, before Miss
Ferell, from Los Angeles, shattered-
the women's 200-meter record
twice.
Miss Ferrell, a silver medalist
in the 100-meter behind Wyomia
Tyus, smashed the 200-mark min-
utes after Australia's Raslene
Boyle matched the American girl's
22.9.
Ron Freeman, an Arizona State
University speedster from Eliza-
beth, N.J., led the American trio
into the semifinals of the 400-
meter dash. winning his heat in
45.3 seconds.
PAUL CAMELET
MASTER TAILOR
for Men and Women
alterations and remodeler
specializes in shortening ladies
coats, slacks, and skirts.
No longer with Comelet Bros.
in business for himself.'
1103 S. University
above the drug store
663-4881

-Associated Press
TOMMIE SMITH AND JOHN CARLOS take the black protest
to the Olympics. Smith (center) won the 200-meter dash with
teammate Carlos finishing second. The protest is symbolized by
the black glove and the two. men's staring down during the play-
ing of the Star Spangled Banner.

by Black Label.

V
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MY GRANOMOrHER'S COMING
TO SEE THE CAMPUS
THIS VI/EEKEAD

F J7 I 'M WAG TO 774E
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RAYHOEo
An Equal Opportunity Employer

4. -

(Consensus in capitals)
'I. MICHIGAN at Indiana
(pick score)
2. Wisconsin at IOWA
3. Minnesota at MICHIGAN
STATE
4. Illinois at NOTRE DAME-
5. Northwestern at OHIO STATE
6. Wake Forest at PURDUE
7. Iowa State at OKLAHOMA
8. Pittsburgh at NAVY
9. Syracuse at PENN STATE,
postponed until Dec. 7
10. Virginia Militaky at THE
CITADEL
I,

11. Alabama at TENNESSEE
12. ?UCLA at CALIFORNIA
13. Cornell at HARVARD
14. Missouri at NEBRASKA
15. ARIZONA STATE vs. Oregon
State
16. TEXAS TECH vs. Mississippi
State
17 FLORIDA at North Carolina
18. STANFORD vs. Washington
State.
19. Southern Mississippi at
MISSISSIPPI
20. Ursinus at MUHLENBURG

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