100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 17, 1968 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, October 17, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Thursday, Oct5ber 17, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pae in

I-

Triumphant Blacks protest inequality

By The Associated Press
MEXICO CITY - Tommie
Smith, shrugging off an agonizing
muscle pull in the 200-meter dash,
and Bob Seagren, confidently
passing up some of his turns in the
pole vault, shattered records last
night in bringing the United
States its fifth and sixth gold
medals of the Olympic Games.
Smith, who pulled'up lame after
winning his semi-final heat just
two hours t earlier and was a
doubtful starter until moments be-
fore the final, hit the tape two
meters ahead of goateed John
Carlos, his San Jose State Col-
lege teammate, and fast-closing
Peter Norman of Australia.
After collecting the gold and
bronze medals respectively, Smith
0. and Carlos then leveled a bitter
racial blast at the white social
structure.
Theyeame out for the victory
celebration wearing one pair of
black goves between them, Smith
on his right hand and Carlos on
his left. They held their hands
high during the playing of the
National Anthem with fists
clenched.
TheY said the reason they wore
only one glove each was that they
could get only one pair of black
ones, which they shared.'
They wore knee-length , black
stockings as an added gesture of
protest against treatment of the
Negroes in the United States and
green and white buttons which
said "Olympic Project for Civil
Rghts."
They also got the silver medal
winner, Peter Norman of Australia,
to wear a similar button on the
victory stand.
Carlos was asked why all the
Negroes were not following t h e
same procedure.
"Each will protest in his own
way," Carlos said.
Explaining their demonstration
on the victory stand, they said the
reason was to show the solidarity
of black America.
Carlos said when he and Smith
mounted the victory stand he
heard applause from the crowd of
about 60,000, but also,heard a lot
of boos and saw people gesturing
with thumbs down, like a crowd at
a bullfight.
"They look upon us as nothing
but animals - low animals, roach-
es and ants," Carlos said..
"We are sort of showhorses out
there for the white people. They

f

-Associated Press
TOMMIE SMITH of the United States throws up his arms as he won the 200-meter sprint in the
Olympic Games yesterday. Smith set an Olympic record with a 20.1 clocking during his semi-final
heat, but limped off the track with what doctors diagnosed as a pulled muscle in the right .leg.
Despite the injury, Smith was able to run in the finals. Teammate John Carlos (259) finished
third in the contest.

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
ROBIN WRIGHT
Young of Casa Grande, Ariz., was
third.
It is one of the closest of long
distance races. The three medal
winners and Kerry O'Brien of
Adstralia were almost even as they
came to the final hurdle at the
head of the stretch.
460-METER DASH
In women's events, Colette Bes-
son, a petite French brunette, won
the women's 400-meter dash,
equaling the Olympic mark, or 52
second.
Giuseppe Gentile, a law student
from Rome, set a world record in
qualifying for the triple jump
final, and Hungarian hammer
thrower Gyula Zsivotsky matched
the Olympic mark in other pre-
liminary as Europeans rose up to
challenge the favored U.S. track
and field forces through the fourth
day of competition.
But the Americans continued to
hold their own on the synthetic
running track in the 11/2-mile-
high Mexican capitol.
Willie Davenoport; Erv Hall sand
Leon Coleman won qualifying
heats in the 110-meter hurdles
and Lee Evans sprinted to a deci-
sive victory in the opening 400-
meter trial, breezing into the sec-
ond round with teammates Larry
James and Ron Freeman.
TODAY'S EVENTS
The United States send its great,
talent-deep band of swimmers and
divers into Olympic action today
with every expectation of collect-
ing the first two gold medals in
world record fashion.
S COR ES
NBA
Yesterday's Results

Uncle Sam's speed marvels are
odds-on favorites to capture both
of the relays in the afternoon and'
to win at least 23 of the 33 gold
medals over-all.
The U.S.A. holds the world rec-
ords in 10 of the men's swimming
events, in nine of the women's
swims and has the world's fastest
current 100-meter fieestyler in Sue
Pedersen.
Don Schollander. the golden boy
of the 1964 Olympics with four
gold medals, will swim with the
United States reserve 400-meter
freestyle relay quartet.I
Schollander, of Jacksonville.
Fla., won the 100 meter freestyle
gold medal and was a member of
the record-breaking 400-meter
freestyle relay team in 1964. He
also won a gold medal in the 400
freestyle and another as a member
of the 800-meter freestyle relay
team.,
This year. he finished fifth in
the 100 of the Olympic trials and
thus lost a place on the 400-relay.
team. He will swim in the 200-
freestyle and 800-meter free-style
relay and is expected to win the
golds in both.

CIVIL ENGINEERS
WASHINGTON STATE
DEPARTMENT OF
H IGHWAYS
Highway engineering is a re-
wording career and the State of
Washington is an exciting place
to work and live. Every phase
of highway civil engineering is
employed in the Washington
Highway Department.
Representatives from the Wash-
ington Department of Highways
will be on the University of Mi-
chigan campus, Thursday, Octo-
ber 24, 1968 interviewing civil
engineers. Interested students
please sign up for an interview
at your campus engineering
placement office. I

GO GO
BAHAMAS
8 FABULOUS DAYS
7 GLORIOUS NIGHTS
$17900.
Dec. 27th-Jan, 3rd
INCLUDES:
" Round trip jet air fare
* 7 Nights accommoda-
tions at the famous
Freeport Inn
* 7 Great happy hours
PLUS, PLUS, PLUS
$50 Holds Your Reservations
CALL:
Your Campus Representative
DICK RINI, 769-0226
or
STUDENTOURS, 886-0844

give us peanuts, pat us on the
back and say 'Well, boy, you did
fine.'"
Then Carlos, his eyes glistening,
added:
"I want you to print this and
print it right. If white people don't
care to see black men perform
they should not come out to the
stadium." .
He said the reason for wearing
the black gloves was to demon-
strate their point for both the
whites and blacks back in the
United States. '
"The reason for the closed fist,"
he said, "was to show that black
men in America are united. We
are gradually - no I mean rap-
idly - getting closer together."
. In the middle of the press inter-
view after the awards ceremony,
Carlos took the bronze medal from
around his neck and passed it on
to his wife standing in the back-
ground.
"This is yours," the black athlete
said. "I do not want it."
Then Carlos told the newsmen

he never again would attend the
Olympics games unless he paid his
own way there. This represented a'
virtual announced boycott of the
197 Games in Munich, Germany.
Carlos did most of the speaking
but Smith, from Lemoore, Calif.,
nodded his head in agreement.
In other action, several Olympic
standards fell yesterday with re-
cord-happy athletes ripping
through qualifying and final field
events.
POLE VAULTINGj
The pole vaulting competition
was one of the most dramatic in
Olympic history, with an unpre-
cedented five vaulters still in con-
rention at three-quarters of an
inch higher than the accepted
world mark.
But Bob Seagren of Los Angeles
won the gold medal on a technical
decision after Claus Schiprowski
of West Germany and Wolfgang
Nordwig of East Germany cleared
the world record height of 17 feet,
8% inches.
The places of the three were
determined on misses on the way
up. Nordwig had, two at the pre-
vious height of . 17-8 and was
placed third. Seagren and Schip-
rowski each had one miss at
17-81.2
However, at 17-61, Schiprowski
had one miss and Seagren passed
it up, which is counted as a sue-
cess for him.
This gave Seagren first, Schi-I

prowski second, and Nordwig
third.
Never have three men vaulted so
high in one competition. All three
exceeded the accepted world rec-
ord of 17-71%. However, Seagren
has a pending mark of 17-9.
Nordwig again failed narrowly
on his third'and last attempt, and
then Seagren took the spotlight.
He was given a big cheer when
he went to the head of the run-
way, but he kicked off the bar on
his way up. Schiprowski also miss-
ed, and the competition finally
had ended-after nearly 6% hours
-with Seagren declared the win-
ner.
JAVELIN THROW
Janis Lusis of Russia captured
the gold medal in the javelin
throw with an Olympic record
toss of 295 feet, 7 inches.
The Russian strongman's vic-
tory climaxed a spree of record
breaking in the event.
Jorma Kinnunon of Finland
took the silver medal with a heave
of 290-7%/ and Gregely Kulcsar of
Hungary won the bronze . at
285-7%/.
All three broke the Olympic
mark of 281-21/ set by Norway's
Egil Danielsen in 1958.
STEEPLE CHASE
Amos Kipwabok Biwott of Ke-
nya, one of the unknowns of the
1968 Olympic Games, won the
3,000 meter steeplechase by out-

Whether you be Scotsman or college
man.. this is a true thrift value!

/

Gridde P ick ing b
In the dull and commonplace events of day to day living one
thing makes it all worth while.
Soft but firm, laying temptingly before you, it beckons you to
come closer. Mysterious fragrances drawing out sensuous desires. So
thin and yet so full of spice. Dark she is, yet here and there a flash
of passionate red. Subtle curves enticing you to pick her up and hold
her in your hand. You have dreamt about meeting her. Touching her
you barely lose control, (pant, pant, pant).
Warm and gentle, you try to break away, to get her out of your
mind. But you just, can't leave, her. You're hung up and feel lost
without her.
Soothing and satisfying, apeasing your appetite, you go away
feeling your hunger vanished. Subtle, but by no means shy, revealing
all her delights before you.
Fooling yourself you think she belongs only to you. But many
know her, many have seen her. She is called by her lovers as The
Treasure of Italy.
And now lusty readers, you too can enjoy her. You too can experi-
ence the pleasure and delight of an instant of ecstasy.
Enter Gridde Pickings and win this tantalizing treat from Cottage

Cincinnati 125, Atlanta 110
Baltimore 124, Detroit 116
Today's Games
Seattle at San Diego
NHL
Yesterday's Results
New York 3, Philadelphia 1
Toronto 2, Pittsburgh 2, tie
Chicago 10, Minnesota 4
Today's Games
New York at Detroit
Montreal at Minnesota

,l
i

I

cnrin+inn Inic 4-- +6 'T2an inmin I

sprinuing nis teammate, Benjami Boston at Los Angeles
Kege, in the stretch. George Pittsburgh at Phlladelphia

,

U

"HUMPHREY or REACTION:
the voter's choice"

Speaker: KARL

DE UTSCH

Inn. All entries must be at the
night Friday.
1. MICHIGAN at Indiana
(pick score)
2. Wisconsin at Iowa
3. Minnesota at Michigan State
4. Illinois at Notre Dame
5. Northwestern at Ohio State
6. Wake Forest at Purdue
7. Iowa State at Oklahorma
8. Pittsburgh at Navy
9. Syracuse at Penn State
'10. Virginia Military at The
Citadel

Michigan Daily no later than mid-
Chow.
11. Alabama at Tennessee
12. UCLA at California
13. Cornell at Harvard
14. Missouri at Nebraska
15. Arizona State vs. Oregon State
16. Texas Tech vs. Mississippi
State
17. Florida at North Carolina
18. Stanford vs. Washington State
19. Southern Mississippi at
Mississippi
20. Ursinus at Muhlenburg

Noted Political Scientist
F RI DAY, OCTOBER 18th, 2 P.M.
Michigan Union, Room 3R-S

I

Admission Free

Refreshments

Sponsored by U-M Students for Humphrey, Brian Zemach,
Chrm.; in cooperation with Faculty for Humphrey

U
s_

i

samm

UNIVERSITY CHARTER & CALEDONIAN AIRWAYS

EUROPE FLIGHTS 1969
SIGN-UP
ON
BOEING 707 JET AIRCRAFT
FLIGHT 1-May 7-June 24 7 wks. $199 (
FLIGHT 6*-Dec. 21-Jan. 8 Christmas Holidays $175 FRIDAY, OCT. 18 3 P.M. Rm. 100
FLIGHT 2-M ay 15-Aug. 20 14 wks. $204 TUESDAY, OCT. 22 6 P.M. Rm: 150
FLIGHT 3-une 27-Aug.E 25 8EA C.wks. $229
FLIGHT 4-June 2-June 29 4 wks. $199 WDEDY C.2 .I m 5
FLIGHT '5-July 8-Aug. 17 6 wks. $214 (WDEAYOC.26P..R.15

All flights are
DETROIT-LONDON-DETROIT

HUTCHENS HALL
(LAW SCHOOL)

WAIT LISTS WILL BE TAKEN
for each flight.

I I B~~~ 5I1fl00 deposvit reauiired-lcit csign un 1

I

I I

S

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan