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October 16, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-16

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r
Wednesday, October 1 6, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Cuba: A study in contrasts

HAVANA (R) - Life In Cuba,
1968, is a study in contrasts.
The average Cuban is spend-
ing more money than ever before
for less food. At the same time no
one is starving.
While having to spend m o re
and more for food,- many house-
hold expenses for the average
Cuban have been eliminated by
the government of Fidel Castro.
Education is free and the average
Cuban spends less than his coun-
terpart in any other country for
hospitalization and other social
services.
# The high cost of eating, how-
ever, is tempered by the fact many
household expenses have been
eliminated under the Castro gov-
ernment. Most medical service is
free; All education is. So are pub-
lic telephones, funerals, marriages,
sports events and many cultural
activities.
Rent is free or minimal. Income
taxes are almost a thing of the
past. A new law guarantees work-
ers who decline overtime pay 100
DIAL 5-6290
Shows at 1,3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.
iRe PAUL NEWMAN production of
rachel,
*eCOMING z

Fidel Castro

fuse overtime pay, to work 12-
hour shifts for eight hours pay
and to volunteer for payless week-
end duty.
High school students spend 45
days yearly in the fields. Havana
University students work one
weekend out of four in the coun-
try. Castro has indicated when the
coffee harvest comes much of the
labor will be done by the country's
students.
He explains the government
has priorities which must be fol-
lowed if the country is to leave
underdevelopmentby 1975.
Prime among these priorities is
the goal of 10 million tons of sugar
production in 1970. This would be
almost double this year's output
and a record for Cuba.
The government also is setting
up costly irrigation projects, build-
ing hundreds of earth dams, con-
structing highways, hunting for
oil, boosting nickel production,
manufacturing farm machinery
and finishing three big thermal
electric plants.
Some observers contend the real
struggle going on in Cuba today
is ideological, not economic. They
say Cuba's Communist allies,
namely Russia, may let her floun-
der but never fail. Whether there
is an economic breakthrough, they
say, depends on whether Castro
can move the masses, not just his
militant followers who run the
country.
In building this ideology, Cas-
tro stresses that material incen-
tives corrupt man. He cites his
favorite target, the United States,
as an example of how materialism
degrades. Governmefnt-controlled
news media echo the line with
everything available backing the
Cuban contention U.S. society is
sick.

percent of their salaries if they
are disabled on the job.
As life grows harder and the
shortages mount, the government
calls on Cubans to spend more
and more time in production to
see that time and past years dis-
appointments are not repeated.
More than one million persons
were mobilized last spring for the
sugar harvest. Thousands a n d
thousands have been called to
weekend voluntary labor in agri-
culture and construction.
The Young Communist League
has recruited 40;000 young men
and women for three years' agri-
cultural; work in Camaguey Pro-
vince. Officials say they will have
10,000 more soon and the total
will reach 100,000 in 1969..
Communist party officials,
meanwhile, have pressed t h e i r
campaign to get workers to re-

the
news today
yb ) Te Asso 'za/d Press aid Celli-Sc Pres s en fce

Writing at gravity zero
The effect of full weightlessness is demonstrated in this picture beamed back from Apollo 7 yester-
day. Astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr. reaches for a pencil he released, which floats in front of the
capsule's instrument panel.
RIOTING IN LONDONDERRY:
Britain faces Irish problem
after period of relative calm

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Open: 11 A.M.-2 A.M.
Above Ad Worth 25c toward Dinner (One per Customer)
"AN EXCELLENT FILM- THOUGHTFUL, MOVING
AND FAITHFUL !"
-Life Magazine

LONDON (P) - The Irish are
again posing a problem to the
British after nearly half a century
of relative peace.
England's decision in 1920 to
partition Ireland into a free state
which became today's Irish Re-
public and a province in Northern
Ireland still linked to Britain end-
ed decades of killings and a bloody
civil war.
However, the war never really
ended. There have been occasional
outbreaks since the partition, not-
ably in Belfast four years ago. But
it took the savage rioting in
Londonderry last weekend to rouse
the nation. The incident proved
how thin the peace is, at least in
the North, apd stirred protests in
London and Dublin.
Prime Minister Harold Wilson
has been urged for months to en-
sure a greater degree of demo-
cracy for Northern Ireland. Civil
rights campaigners, particularly
strong among the Roman Catholic
minority, demanded the."one man,
one vote" principle in local elec-
tions; an end to gerrymandering
and ward rigging and the intro-
duction of Britain's race relations
act to fight discrimination.
Wilson, like other British prime
ministers before him, could do
little beyond having the 1920 Gov-
ernment of Ireland Act revised.

That would raise basic constitu-
tional issues. Northern Ireland is
self-governing so far as home af-
fairs are concerned. It controls its
own police, has its own govern-
ment and Parliament in Belfast.
The North's prime minister,
Terence O'Neill, has given Wilson
and his Whitehall advisers a
forthright warning not to inter-
fere. Any attempt to do so would
be self-defeating,, he said.
You don't join a political party
in Northern Ireland; you're borne
into it.
If your parents are Protestants
of Scotch-Irish descent like two-
thirds of the population, then you
support the ruling Unionist party.
Your flag is the Union Jack, your
party color orange. You may join
one of the militant Orange lodges
and march through the streets
with drawn sword to protect your
banner from "the' Papists."
If your parents are Roman
Catholics, you're a Nationalist,
your color is green, your favored
flag may be the Irish Republic's
tricolor. You're in the minority
and sometimes made to feel it.
A few may cross these strictly
drawn politico-religious lines, But
a Protestant Nationalist risks
meeting discrimination in business
and at home. And, until a few

years ago, no Catholic was ever
admitted to the Unionist party.
The few who cross over are re-
garded with suspicion.
In the ancient walled city of
Londonderry all the usual North-
ern Irish tensions are heightened.
It is only a few miles from the
Irish Republic, and that tends to
keep the Protestants nervous. It
even has a Roman Catholic ma-
jority within; the city.
They talk in Londonderry about
the famous siege of Derry as if it
took place yesterday. That was in
1688 when Protestants held out
for 105 days against the forces of
Roman Catholic King James II
until relieved by sea. The same
sort of siege mentality rules in
the Orange lodges now. They feel
under constant threat.
Roman Catholics outnumber
Protestants on Londonderry's local
electoral register by 13,515 to
9,235. Yet, because 10,000 of them
live in one town ward, the city
is run by a council composed of
12 Unionists to 8 Nationalists.
Catholic civil rights fighters
claim that the Unionists -use the
local housing shortage to keep
control. Less than a score of hous-
es have been built by the city in
three years, they say, and some
families have been on the waiting
list 17 years.

NEW YORK TEACHERS continued their third strike
in five weeks, crippling the city'school system and keeping
more than a million pupils out of class.
No pact was in sight between the United Federation of
Teachers, representing 48,000 teachers, and the city school
board, as union president Albert Shanker warned the strike
could last "a month or longer."
Rhody A. McCoy, the administrator of the black and
Puerto Rican decentralized Ocean Hill district which has been
the focus of the strikes, said meanwhile he is exploring the
possibility of'running the district as a "private school district,
financed by company funds and open to the public."
The union teachers have declared they will strike until
guaranteed safety from physical harassment, "acts of ter-
rorism and violence" against 16 teachers previously ousted
from Junior High School 271.
INVOLUNTARY SECOND TOURS OF VIETNAM face
24,000 Army and Marine Corps servicemen.
U.S. forces are reassigning to Vietnam 24,000 career ser-
vicemen - not draftees - if they have been away from the
war zone for at least two years. Previously, few nonvolunteers
have faced returning to Vietnam, but the length of the war,
high turnover of personnel and tight supply of seasoned offi-
cers and non-commissioned officers have necessitated the
change.
The Army contingent will include 4,950 officers, and 12,
900 enlisted men. The Marine returnees will include 1,000 of-
ficers and 5,000 enlisted men.
The Air Force, which has no official policy on intervals
before second tours, announced it will return 150 noncommis-
sioned officers to Vietnam duty.
* 0 0
COMMUNIST CHINA'S PRESIDENT LIU SHAG-CHI,
one of Chairman Mao Tse-Tung's strongest opponents,
has been stripped of all his official functions in the Party,
Peking radio reported yesterday.
Since 1966, Liu has come under bitter attack by pro-Mao-
ist forces as an "antirevolutionary revisionist" in the "great
ptroletarian cultural revolution. Reports periodically have in-
dicated Liu's loss of power, but none thus far claimed he had
actually been ousted from office.
Liu became president in 1959 after an internal party strug-
gle stripped Mao of that post, but' left him chairman of the
Communist party, with Liu second in party command.
0 "
UN SECRETARY GENERAL U THANT disclosed yes-
terday he has asked the big four powers to hold a summit
conference.
Thant said he has sent identical letters to the United
States, Soviet/Union, Britain and France prpposing that their
foreign ministers meet to discuss strengthening the United
Nations and rules of international conduct.
Thant suggested a full summit meeting could follow some
time in 1969.
A possible'agenda for the meetings would include discu-
sions on the financial crisis in the UN,,peacekeeping opera-
tions, limited aspects of disarmament, and discussion of prob-
lems in the Middle East.
UN spokesmen said that although Thant had not receiv-
ed any formal replies, the French, British and Russian foreign
ministers reacted favorably. There was no reaction yet from
Secretary of State Dean Rusk.
* 0 0
APOLLO 7's SUCCESS has almost assured the U.S.
will attempt to orbit three men around the moop by
Christmas.
A reliable source said yesterday the flight of the three-
man spacecraft is going so well that high National Aeronaut-
ics and Space Administration officials are meeting this week
to firm up a date for a flight around the moon. One report
sets December 21 as launch day.
The only obstacle that might block a circumlunar space
shot for Apollo 8, the next manned mission, would be prob-
lems occurring later in the 11-day flight of Apollo 7.
0 " .
SOVIET PRESENCE IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA would be
legalized under terms of an agreement made with Krem-
lin leaders, Czech sources reported yesterday.
The-agreement, which comes eight weeks to the day after
the Soviet invasion, is unofficially reported to provide for
gradual withdrawal of some Warsaw pact troops, but to au-
thorize the presence of other occupation forces for some time.
When troop withdrawal starts, the bulk of the contin-
gents from East Germany, Hungary, Poland and Bulgaria is
expected to leave..Regular Soviet troops - some 50,000 to
100,000 - will probably remain.
Czech sources had no details about the treaty, but report-
ed that although the wording is formulated, it will not be
signed for seyeral days.

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.OR " A PARAMOUNT PICTURE."S.M.A.
WED., THURS. & FRI. 7:00 & 9:00 P.M.

CIVIL ENGINEERS
WASHINGTON STATE
DEPARTMENT OF
HIGHWAYS
Highway engineering is a re-
warding career and the State of
Washington is an exciting place
to work and live. Every phase
of highway civil engineering is
employed in the Washington
Highway Department.
Representatives from the Wash-
ington Department of Highways
will be on the University of Mi-
chigan campus, Thursday, Octo-
ber 24, 1968 interviewing civil
engineers. Interested students
please sign up for an interview
at your campus engineering
placement office.

Are you inferested in working in Europe!
Are you interested in working in Europe? We have
student job opportunities in Britain, Germany, Bel-
gium, France, Holland and all of Scandinavia. We
provide assistance to those who would like to do
something constructive while learning a language
and meeting and working with students from other
countries.For, full particulars inquire at the student
newspaper office. (Dept. of National Advertising).

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Is

Tonig

It and Every Wednesday at the
A HOOT

NIu have?
Every minute of
every day, you choose
what you think. And
the thoughts you
choose, determine
your experience.
Thinking spiritually
can bring more good
into your life. Hear
this lecture by Jane
0. Robbins, C.S., a
member of The
Christian Science
Board of Lectureship.
Sponsored by
CHRISTIAN
SCIENCE
ORGAN IZATION
Which is fundamental-matter
or consciousness? Jane ,Rob-
bins, C.S., of Boulder, Colo-
rado, discusses this question in

I

TONIGHT
ORPHANS OF
THE STORM
Directed by D. W. Griffith 1921

An evening of endless musical variety
come do your thing and/or sing 1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.
THURSDAY and FRIDAY
FRANK ALLISON
(from Miami, Florida) singing folk rock and folk music
accompanied by guitar

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UNION-LEAGUE

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TRAVEL COMMITTEE
ANNOUNCES
CHARTERED

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EUROPEAN FLIGHTS
- 3 FLIGHTS SCHEDULED -

PLEDGE

ASSEMBLY

FLIGHT 1 May 4-June 1
DETROIT - LONDON BRUSSELS -

SABENA
DETROIT

SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 19

1:30

FLIGHT M 8-Au 11 SABENA
NEW YORK - LONDON BRUSSELS - NEW YORK
FLIGHT 3 une 29-Aug.R 14 PAN AM
NEWYORK-LONDON PARIS NEWYORK
LOW, LOW RATES FOR TOP CLASS
707 JET SERVICE
.. I I nurIt '4eoA

MICHIGAN-UNION,

Rooms K, L, MN

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