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October 15, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-15

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Tuesday, October 15, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

I

RESTRICTIONS LOOSEN:
Portugal breathes free

By DAVID MAZZ ARELLA
LISBON ()-Without leaking
an official word, the three week
old government of Prime Minister
Marcello Caetano has permitted
de facto liberalization of press
censorship "to get an idea what
the people were thinking."
After 36 years under the repres-
sive regime of aged and ailing
former prime minister Antonia
Salazar, "The papers are reflect-
ing determined points of view that
were completely untouchable," one
published said. "It's been a com-
plete change."
Informed sources report that
government officials have been
privately assuring journalists and
editors that the new prime min-
ister will never again blanket
newspapers with censorship. Of-
ficials promise a new press law
within months.'
Book publishers have been
promised that some publications
previously prohibited for political
reasons would be allowed to cir-
culate soon. Up to 150 books, in-
cluding many novels, are currently
banned in Portugal.
Tight restrictions still inhibit
dailygnewspapers, but the liberal-
ization of editorial content has
been marked.

Two liberal Lisbon afternoon
papers, Diarto de Lisboa and A
Capital, have been the most out-
spoken in calling for liberaliza-
tion, a word which itself was con-
sidered taboo under Salazar's au-
thoritarian regime.
Diario de Lisboa was allowed to
ask for "decompression" of the
national life by enactment of
liberal reforms.
In an unprecedented editorial,
A Capital pronounced "A hope,
much more than a passive expec-
tancy or curiousity, was born in
the Portuguese community" with
the recent change of government.
Alluding to the frequentApolit-
ical arrests under Salazar, A Cap-
ital called for "liberty to think,
liberty to act, without running the
risk of being deprived physically,
without valid reasons, of this
liberty:
The government has responded.
It has gone out of its way to satis-
fy the press with fuller coi-
muniques and with meetings be-I
tween press officials and govern-
ment leader. It has promised to
end the practice of approving of-
ficers of organizations after they
are elected.
Government officials say Cae-
tano has succeeded "quite well"
with the reforms.-

Prime Minister Salazar

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-Associated Press
Once more into the breach

U.S. Marines leave their helicopter for a foray into the hills near the deserted Marine base at Khe
Sanh. The troops are part of a 3,500-m.An joint U.S.-South Vietnamese force combing the western
edge of the Demilitarized Zone for Viet Cong anfd North Vietnamese infiltrators. The area has been
the scene of heavy fighting this year.
SAFETY FIRST:

However, the press has not been
given a blank check. Direct crit-
icism of Salazar is still banned. So,
is direct criticism, of Portugal'sE
basic social system, the corporate
state. There is no criticism of for-
eign policy or policy regarding the
war-plagued African territories.I
This week a book by an oppo-'
sition leader criticizing the secret
police was confiscated.
The name of the exiled opposi-
tion spokesman, Mario Soares,
cannot be used, although refer-
ences to him are allowed.[

Is

moon shot next?

11

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971-0.100
WASHTENAW AVENUE
Between YPSI & ANN ARBOR
n
kajowe- WiTiy TIYE
Cl SS CS" I

.r

By HOWARD BENEDICT feel the risk is too great without
AP Aerospace Writer additional flights to fully qualify
SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON VP the systems.
-Even if the Apollo 7 flight is One fear is that the three as-
perfect, the odds are against a tronauts could be stranded in
:noon orbit flight by Apollo 8 in lunar orbit with no way to get
December. Many space officials home.
The National Aeronautics and
Space Administration has said
AY 4:10 p.PiLhthat a lunar orbit is one of four
mTisions being studied for Apolloj
F OFSPEEh I8. The others are :

WEDNESDAY & THURSD

DEPARTMENT
STUDENT LABOR.1

ATTORY TH lATI

Presents
TANGO PALACE
by Maria J'ornc'
and
THE FALLING SICKNESS
by Russell :dswul
OCTOBER 16 and 17 ADMISSION IREE
Arena Theatre, Frieze Building

---A low earth orbit flight thatI
would essentially be' a repeat of
the present Apollo 7 test. That
would be scheduled only if Navy
-'apt. Walter M. Schirra Jr. and
l'is crew encounter major difficul-
ties.
-An earth orbit flight in which
the astronauts, commanded by.
Air Force Col. Frank Borman,
would fly out to 4,600 miles, six
times higher than man has 'ever
Phone 434-0130

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INATIONAL GENERAL .CORPORATION, I
Last time today FoxEASERNEATES -
"THE SWIMMER" FOH VILLaGE LCMIEERi
7:30 - 9:20 375 No. MAPLE RD.-769-1300
* STARTS TOMORROW *a
IN UE Mun. -Fri,--7:15 - 9:15
IN1L iEVuh7:
ANCE B. KISS 7: 5 - 5 PNVSO ERCL
AND.
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PR ESE NTS
A Festival Week
(Oct. 14-Oct. 20)
Oc. 5BIRTH OF A NATION (1915)
II
ot.ANOF THE STORM
or17-BRKNBOSO S(99
Oct. 181WAY DOWN EAST (1920)
Oct. 1-INTOLERANCE (1916)
' FE
z Oct. z-ISN'T LF O DRU
(191

flown. From that altitude they
would be able to re-enter the at-
tosphere at lunar return speed of
25,000 miles an hour to test con-
ditions astronauts will encounter
when they come home from the
:noon. Apollo 7's maximum speed
is 17,500 miles an hour.
-A circular flight in which
Apollo 8 would swoop around the
backside of the moon but return
to earth withofit orbiting the
noon.
NASA said it would make no de-
cision on Apollo 8 until the results
:f Apollo 7 have been thoroughly
valuated. That would be in No-
vember.
Dr. George E. Mueller, NASA
associate administrator for man-
ned space flight, believes at least
one additional flight of the 'Apol-
lo hardware will be necessary be-
fore committing to a moon orbit
test.
He also noted that a moon orbit
flight is not a necessary pre-
requisite for a manned lunar land-
ing attempt.
The Apollo spaceship by itself
has only one big engine that can
take out of a moon orbit once it
gets there. If it fails, the astro-
nauts cannot get home.
On later moon flights, the
Apollo spaceship will hook up with
with. the Lunar Module, the bug-
like vehicle that will taxi two of
the three-man crew to the lunar
surface. If the Apollo engine fail-
ed, the astronauts could fire the
Lunar Module engine to head
back for earth.
Apollo 8 will be the first man-
ned flight to utilize the power of
the Saturn 5, the world's mightiest
rocket which is five times more
powerful than the Saturn 1B that
boosted Apollo 7.
Some officials are leery about
coimmittin~g the first Saturn, 5
launching toan ambitious moon
flight.
One official noted that news-
men have made a big thing about
the possibility of the Apollo 8 as-
tronauts orbiting the moon on
Christmas Day and added:
"But how do you think the
world would feel if we stranded
those three men in orbit around
the moon on Christmas Day?"
DIAL 5-6290
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.
in the PAUL NEWMAN production of
chel,
racWe
>COMING .

Fthe
news today
by The Associated Press and College -Press Service
NEW YORK TEACHERS went on strike yesterday for
the third time, in five weeks,
The issue was the same one that paralyzed the city's
school system in the two earlier strikes - the demand by the
AFL-CIO United Federation of Teachers for reinstatement of
80 white teachers by the community-controlled Ocean Hill-
Brownsville school board. The experimental school district, in
Brooklyn, is predominantly Negro and Puerto Rican.
The latest strike focused around the reopening of Ocean
Hill's Junior High School 271. Union president Albert Shanker
said 16 of the ousted teachers have been subjected to "acts of
terrorism and violence." He insisted the Board of Education
either close the school or remove "those people who threaten
to kill others."
Ocean Hill, one of the three districts set up to test the
concept of neighborhood control of schools, had opened its
schools with nonunion teachers filling some of the vacancies
left by the 80 ousted teachers.
THE 90th CONGRESS adjourned yesterday leaving a
host of legislation unfinished.
Only about 20 house members and six senators were on
hand when both chambers quit in the early afternoon. Most
of the other congressmen lad gone home to campaign with
election day only three weeks away.
Lack of a quorum in the House had blocked adjournment
Friday and Saturday. Backers of a House-passed bill to open
the way for radio-television debates by the three major presi-
dential candidates were trying to keep Congress in session
until the Senate acted on the measure.
At the Monday session, however, Rep. James O'Hara (R-
Mich), leader of the group pushing the bill, gave up his fight
to halt adjournment. He said it was "obvious" the Senate
would not act.
President Johnson has served notice he may call the Sen-
ate back to ratify a treaty aimed at halting the spread of nu-
clear weapons. If such a summons is feasible, Johnson pre-
sumably will call the senators back after the Nov. 5 elections.
THE APOLLO 7 MISSION enjoyed continued success
yesterday including a seven minute television transmis-
sion to the country.
Capt. Walter M. Schirra Jr., who refused to turn on the
on-board television camera Saturday, greeted America with
a sign reading "Hello from the lovely Apollo room, high atop
everything." Mission control said the transmission was "amaz-
ing and much better than expected."
Moments after the television broadcast Mission Control
directed a third burn of the 20,000 pound thrust service pro-
pulsion rocket. The burn lasted nine seconds and was against
the direction Apollo 7 was traveling. This caused the space
craft to slow slightly and go into another orbit.
* * *
ARMED GUARDS IN PANAMA patroled'the country
yesterday following the military coup which deposed
President Arnulfo Arias Friday.
Despite *Arias' call from exile for "total war," the new
civilian military junta under the leadership of provisional
president Col. Jose M. Pinilla, said the country was quiet.
In a message to the nation during installation ceremonies
Sunday, Pinilla said civilian authority would be restored as
soon as conditions allow.
THE SUPREME COURT set a precedent yesterday in
a decision concerning servicemen and their off-base con-
duct.
The court agreed to consider whether servicemen can be
court-martialed for crimes committed on leave and off-post.
Former Sgt. James F. O'Callahan, who was court-martialed in
the rape of a 14-year-old girl-in 1956, persuaded the court to
take action. He was dishonorably discharged in 1957 and for-
feited all''pay and allowances in addition to being sentenced
by a military tribunal to 10 years hard labor.
O'Callahan's lawyers questioned whether servicemen can
be deprived of the Constitutional right to be indicted by a
grand jury and tried by a civilian court when the offense
charged has "no direct or substantial effect" in maintaining
military discipline.
The Justice Department had argued against Supreme
Court consideration, explaining soldiers and sailors remain
under military jurisdiction both on and off-duty.
* S 0

PRAGUE FACTORY WORKERS have come to the de-
. fense of Communist party chief Alexander Dubcek' and.
other popular Czech leaders.
In a resolution issued as Premier Oldrich Cernik opened
new talks in Moscow concerning Czechoslovakia's future, the
workers condemned Soviet bloc press attacks "against our
state and political leaders who have won our confidence." As
long as the attacks continue, the workers promised "we can-
not and shall not be silent."
The resolution is particularly significant since the fac-
tory workers are employes of an industry long headed by
Antonin Kapek, an old guard Communist now actively work-
ing with anti-Dubcek factions in the party.
Areyouinterestedin working inEurope!
Are you interested in working in Europe? We have
student job opportunities in Britain, Germany, Bel-
gium, France, Holland and all of Scandinavia. We
provide assistance to those who would like to do
something constructive while learning a language
and meeting and working with students from other
countries. For full particulars inquire at the student
newspaper office. (Dept. of National Advertising).

I I

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NOV.

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SAN FRANCISCO MIME TROUPE
Fi- V~mrrom~Cr inv nn A7rnrvY

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