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October 11, 1968 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-11

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

"IT TAKES 36 STEPS
TO GET THERE
But it's worth every step!"
MIDDLE EARTH
(in the loft)
215 So. State St.
NEW HOURS: Mon.-Sot. 1 1 A.M.-10 P.M.
Sun. 12 Noon-6 P.M.
PHONE: 769-1468

H ILLEL
1429 Hill St.
Tonight at 7:15
Student Sabbath
Services
Followed by'
Oneg Shabbat

HHH draws crowds
at Wall Street rally

I

E 'Rv The A ccr .iafiwrl PresC

11

Lose Something?
Find it with a
Daily Classified

NEW YORK - Hubert H. Hum-
phrey quoted his political stock on
Wall Street - in a mixed market
- and then huddled with his run-
ningmate and campaign manager
to plan strategy for the final three
and a half weeks of their uphill
campaign.
The vice president met with Sen.
Edmund G. Muskie, the No. 2 man
on -the Democratic ticket, and
Lawrence O'Brien, national Dem-
ocratic chairman and campaign
chief, at his hotel suite.
The main subject of discussion:
how to .catch up with Republican
Richard M. Nixon, still leading in
the public opinion polls.
Humphrey earlier took h i s
search for campaign c a s h and
votes to Wall Street and standing
under a pink confetti shower

E

I

lbs

Check these details. Long wing styling.
Hefty soles with storm welts. Hard heels. Husky

Sulbei

tinnpr laatlior Aiifbmv,+;r

upper ather. A1uientic
brogue look. Today's
smart fashion colors.
It's a traditional
Live One
w l #

taking nothing for granted despite
the signs that he is ahead and will
campaign intensively in the wan-
ing days of the race.
"You are concerned about Amer-
ica," he told a cheering crowd of
6,500 in a Moline field house. "You
are concerned about what h a s
happened to it."
"And because of your concern
I believe we are going to win
we are going to win in Illinois, '
we are going to win America-
and we are going to win big," he
said.
* * *
PEORIA, Ill. - George C- Wal-
lace, declaring that 'the Vietnam
war "is the most important mat-
ter facing the American people,"
bore down hard on foreign policy
in speeches yesterday after an-
nouicing he would send his run-
ning mate, Curtis E. LeMay, to
Vietnam. H I
The third part~y presidential
candidate, in stronger than usual-
language, said in Peoria, "I'm go-
ing to assure you that we will win MS U RESOLUTION:
the "Vietnam war militarily wisih
conventional weapons," should
diplomacy fail.
He said that both he and Le-, S tident t
May had seen war, had been shot
at, and, "We don't want to see
any more war in the world." But EAST LANSING (P) - The In
he said the way to world peace Michigan 'State University Board the
was through a strong military pos-.(AS
ture. 1 of Trustees has "consciously es- pas
"When you are strong you can tablished the doctrine that stu- at
go to t he conference stable," he dents are guilty until proven in- T
said, "but when you are weak, you nocent," says the student govern- Joh
can be blackmailed." ing body at MSU. gate
*dent

S

--Associated Press

[H on Wall Street

CampoaI gn
drummed a theme of Democratic
prosperity.
MOLINE, Ill. Richard M. Nixoni
forecast yesterday that he "will
win big" in the Nov. 5 presidential
election, saying "the stakes are too:
high not to h a v e 'a change in'
America this year."
The GOP nominee, campaigning I
in Illinois and Ohio, said he is +

a

port blaststrustees

by
PLYMOUTH'
* black .
* tan 1
t
* olive
$27.00

TONIGHT ,ONLY
Congregational Church. State and William

8 P.M.

"aan
uniN
H
the
reco
luti
cere
S
of

n a six-page position paper,
Associated Students of MSU
SMSU) criticized 'a resolution
sed recently by the Trustees
a closed meeting.'
he resolution gives President:
n A. Hannah or ,,his dele-
e the power to suspend a stu-
it whose activity, is considered
immediate threat" to noral
versity operations.
.annah, who previously backed
measure, later said he would
ommend rescinding the reso-
on that led to a "cremation"
emony on his front steps.
tudents there burned copies
the MSU academic freedomi

report, which they said was
"dead" if the resolution were al-
lowed to stand.
"The Board of Trustees, by
secretly passing this resolution,
has circumvented the amendment
procedures established in the
academic freedom report," the
ASMSU paper said.
"Trustees have, in fact, placed
themselves in a position superior
to the report and reduced it to
a hollow testimony to the -myth
of academic freedom."
"MSU trustees." the paper
added, "cannot expect students to
follow a freedom report if they
do not."

4

14

-

-

I

"The Paris Peace Talks-What Do the Vietnamese People Want"
Representative Vietnamese Overseas Buddhist Association
Former Acting Ambassador to the United States
Since reigning as South Vietnam's Acting Ambassador to the United States
in 1964-after a decade in its foreign service-TRAN VAN DINH has
lived in Washington, devoting his energies to writing and lecturing in the
United States and Canada in an effort to present a picture, of the situa-
tion in Vietnam as he and his fellow Buddhists see it.

STUDENTS

SbTrSESTO2RE
619 E. Liberty-6-06

1

Ann Arbor Council of Churches Interfaith Committee for Religion & Peace,
American Friends Service Committee, Office of Religious Affairs 2282 SAB

i

SPECIAL RATES
438 W. Huron

FOR WEEKENDS
663-2033

1,

U..

U

U

1

'E

The undersigned members of the student body and faculty of the University of Michigan and members of the Ann
community at large associate themselves with people of good will throughout the world in condemning the suppr
of Jewish spiritual and cultural life in the U.S.S.R. The evidence presented by the American Jewish Conference on
Jewry and consequent protests from groups as diverse as 349 United States congressmen and many noted Western
pean Communists leaves no room to doubt that the Soviet government continues to pursue a program calculated
stroy the means of Jewish cultural and spiritual survival and to break the will of Soviet Jewry to live as Jews. Such a
tice not only violates fundamental human rights, but it is contrary to the guarantees of Soviet law and asserted polic
Alone among Soviet nationality groups, Jews are forbidden the schools and other institutions of Jewish lear
teaching and publishing that is required if their heritage is to be perpetuated. Alone among major religious groups
Soviet'inionJews are forbidden the right to have any form of nationwide federation of congregations or of c I e
Alone among major religious groupsin the Soviet Union, Jews have no formal and official contact with their co
ionists abroad. A systematic campaign of intimidation inhibits them from openly protesting these inequities.
On Saturday, thousands of young Soviet Jews will crowd their re spect iv e synagogues and dance in the surr
ing streets to celebrate the holiday of SIM CHAT TORAH and make their annual assertion of their Jewishness. We
everyone who values human, rights of individuals and groups to join us on Sunday, Oct. 13 at 12 noon at the Hillel
dation,1429 HillStreet,for a symposium on Soviet anti-Semitism designed to protest these inequities and to demon
our solidarity with the Jews of the Soviet Union.

Arbor
ession
Soviet
Euro-
to de-
prac-
y.
n i n g,
in the
orgy.
-relig-
ound-
invite
Foun-
strate

i

I' W

Dr. Gerald D. Abrams
Ellen Adams
Ann Arbor Jewish Cultural
School
Stewart M. Benjamin
Seymour Bell
Leonard Berlanstein
Alan Bloom
Dr. and Mrs. Phillip"Booth
Mark G. Brakoniecki
Michael M. Breyer
Barbara Cohen

Jerry DeGrieck
Howard t. Elfo rd
Beulah R. Elving
Dr. Phillip Elving
Vicki Epstein.
Or. Kasimir Fajans
Edward Feldman
Dr. Sidney Fine
Heidi J. Fox,
Paul and Vivian Friedman
Dr Frnest G. Fontheim

Mr. and Mrs. J. Gordon

Susan E. Greenberg
Kerry L. Greenbert
Lewis A. Greenly
Garry Grossman

Dr. Alexander Z. Guiora
Geri Natalie Gutstein
Dr. Charles Hacker
Walter L. Harrison
Marjie Hauser

Rhoda Konigsberg
David H. Krantz
Dr. Robert H. Lapin
Erik Lippa
Jdy Masserman
Annette L. Menuhin
Barbara F. Parker
Harriet C. Parker
Irwin Pollack
Dr. John Henry Richter
Phvllic Ronhenaum

-r

Doris Seligson
Dr. Melvin L. Selzer .
Mr. and Mrs. M. 1. Semmel,
Eileen Silverman
Robert Sternberg
Alan M. Tigay
Dr. Ronald S. Tikofsky
Lynn Weiner
Sylvia Wertheimer
M. Yaron
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Zand

Alexander Gotz
Mike Margolin
Adena Greenberg
Michele Sinkoff
Dr. Joseph A. Reif
Buzzy Gordon
Wendy H imes
Susan J. Shapiro
Lisa Goodman'.
Joel M. Levitt
Mike Singer
J. Baumer

V

i

Ba-rrv L. Howard

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